The Long Poiesis
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The Long Poiesis
Accelerating The MInd of The Future
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Erik Brynjolfsson: The key to growth? Race with the machines | Video on TED.com

As machines take on more jobs, many find themselves out of work or with raises indefinitely postponed. Is this the end of growth? No, says Erik Brynjolfsson -- it’s simply the growing pains of a radically reorganized economy.
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Antifragile system design principles | Beyond The Beyond | Wired.com

Antifragile system design principles | Beyond The Beyond | Wired.com | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
*These are rather like the principles of the Joi Ito-era MIT Media Lab, but even scarier. Imagine falling into the clutches of an antifragile justice syst
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Miro Svetlik's curator insight, April 22, 2013 5:15 AM

I couldn't agree more on this. Nearly all my solution design and architecting efforts for last 10 years were influenced by the same beliefs. Thank you Bruce for putting is nicely.

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Aubrey de Grey on

Aubrey de Grey on | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Philanthropy by high net worth individuals has the potential to move the needle on any major biotechnology project these days. The cost of research in the field is falling rapidly,...
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33rd Square | Implantable, Bioengineered Rat Kidney Created

33rd Square | Implantable, Bioengineered Rat Kidney Created | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have created a bioengineered kidney that can be transplanted back into a rat, where it begins making urine.
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Mathematicians Predict the Future With Data From the Past | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

Mathematicians Predict the Future With Data From the Past | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
In Issac Asimov's classic science fiction saga Foundation, mathematics professor Hari Seldon predicts the future using what he calls psychohistory.
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luiy's curator insight, April 12, 2013 7:30 AM

Turchin — a professor at the University of Connecticut — is the driving force behind a field called “cliodynamics,” where scientists and mathematicians analyze history in the hopes of finding patterns they can then use to predict the future. It’s named after Clio, the Greek muse of history.

 

These academics have the same goals as other historians — “We start with questions that historians have asked for all of history,” Turchin says. “For example: Why do civilizations collapse?” — but they seek to answer these questions quite differently. They use math rather than mere language, and according to Turchin, the prognosis isn’t that far removed from the empire-crushing predictions laid down by Hari Seldon in the Foundation saga. Unless something changes, he says, we’re due for a wave of widespread violence in about 2020, including riots and terrorism.

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DARPA ARM Robot Can Now Change Your Tires - IEEE Spectrum

DARPA ARM Robot Can Now Change Your Tires - IEEE Spectrum | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
DARPA's Autonomous Robotic Manipulation program is gunning for AAA
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Stewart Brand: The dawn of de-extinction. Are you ready? | Video on TED.com

Throughout humankind's history, we've driven species after species extinct: the passenger pigeon, the Eastern cougar, the dodo ... But now, says Stewart Brand, we have the technology (and the biology) to bring back species that humanity wiped out.
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3 Reasons Why Your Predictions Of The Future Will Go Wrong

3 Reasons Why Your Predictions Of The Future Will Go Wrong | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Futurism is a richly metaphorical body of thought. It has to be; much of what we talk about is on the verge of unimaginable, so we have to resort to metaphors for it to make any kind of sense.
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Biological computer that 'lives' inside the body comes one step closer as scientists make transistor out of DNA and RNA

Biological computer that 'lives' inside the body comes one step closer as scientists make transistor out of DNA and RNA | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Scientists believe they are close to building the first truly biological computer made from the organic molecules of life and capable of working within the living cells of organisms ranging from microbes to man.
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Web 4.0: The Ultra-Intelligent Electronic Agent is Coming

Web 4.0: The Ultra-Intelligent Electronic Agent is Coming | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
The evolution of the Web today is happening faster than the transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 due to processing power, bandwidth and storage, "creating a curve of exponential change."

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET, Lockall, luiy
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luiy's curator insight, March 29, 2013 5:55 AM

According to Burrus, Web 4.0 is about "the ultra-intelligent electronic agent."

This agent will "recognize you when you get in front of it because all of your devices are getting a little camera. And with facial recognition, they’ll know it’s you." Burrus says you will be able to give your agent a personality. It will say to you things like this:

"Good morning. You're flying to Boston today. Take a raincoat, it's raining. By the way, that fight you were taking, it’s already been canceled. Don't worry about it. There was a mechanical. I've already booked you on a new one. I'll tell you about on the way to the airport. But remember you’re going to exercise every day and I’m here to remind you that you’re going to exercise."  And you might say, “I don't know if I want to exercise today,” and It'll show you a nude profile of yourself.  And you’ll say, “You know what, I think I'm going to exercise today.”

Another ultra-intelligent agent that Burrus says is coming to us fast is the screen-less smartphone. What would that look like? It hasn't been designed yet. But let's suppose it might look like jewelry and you can wear it. Whatever it looks like and whoever makes it, Burrus says one thing is for certain: it will be game-changing and it will be big. 

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The Myth of Cyberspace – The New Inquiry

The Myth of Cyberspace – The New Inquiry | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

In the early 1980s, when personal computing first became a reality, the faces of glowing terminals had an almost magical aura, transubstantiating arcane passages of 1s and 0s into sensory experience. In fact, the seemingly impenetrable complexity of what was unfolding behind the screen created a sense of mystery and wonderment. We were in awe of the hackers who could unlock the code and conjure various illusions from it; they were modern magicians who seemed to travel between two worlds: reality and cyberspace. One day, we imagined, these sages of cyberspace would leave their bodies behind and fully immerse themselves in the secret world behind the screen. Such images manifested themselves through the decades in films like Tron, Hackers, and The Matrix and in the fiction narratives of the cyberpunk genre. When the public internet first emerged, images of cyberspace were already deeply embedded in our collective imagination; these images have become the primary lens through which we view and evaluate our online activity. For this reason, tracing the genealogy of the cyberspace concept reveals much about present cultural assumptions regarding our relationship with information technology.


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luiy's curator insight, March 18, 2013 1:38 PM

The great irony of the cyberspace concept is that, though we embraced it to resolve cognitive dissonance, it has come to cause only more of it. As Facebook, Twitter, and other social-networking sites have grown more popular, it has become undeniable that they play an important role in organizing our social lives. Our presence on these sites arguably has become so important that we begin to experience the world differently, tailoring our behavior toward producing desirable sorts of things to share on them. We all know intuitively that what we do online affects us offline and vice versa — that both comprise the same friends, the same conversations, the same events. Yet the collective fantasy of cyberspace and all its related vocabulary are so deeply embedded in our cultural logic that we cannot help but lapse into denial of these obvious truths. Our language betrays us; it obfuscates the truth of our experience.

Western culture has a long history of creating such dualisms when confronted with crises of meaning or identity. For example, we have long evaded questions regarding our mortality by conceptually separating matter and form, body and soul. As with cyberspace, this age-old dualism generated a subsequent need to imagine a space where soul could exist apart from body, so we imagined heaven and hell. Our uncritical acceptance of the cyberspace fantasy has imbued it with a similar sacredness; it has become part of a new secular religion, built on faith in something that is imagined but never experienced.

Religion, as Emile Durkheim famously defined it, “is a unified system of beliefs and practices relative to sacred things, that is to say, things set apart and surrounded by prohibitions — beliefs and practices that unite its adherents in a single moral community.” Cyberspace is exactly the sort of thing that we have set apart conceptually and subjected to ceaseless moralizing: It has become almost second nature to claim that “the virtual” is less intimate, authentic, or natural than “the real.” Despite its failure to compellingly describe the world we inhabit, cyberspace nevertheless thrives as a framework for making moral judgments about that same world. Cyberspace has become our Mount Olympus, the founding myth of the Internet Age. It is an article of faith, not the product of lived experience.

Of course, there is nothing intrinsically wrong with fantasy. Speculative fiction provides an important opportunity to anticipate and prepare for techno-cultural change. The problem arises when we begin to prioritize that fictional narrative over actual experience, when we let these speculations control the reality that emerges. We have allowed the myth of cyberspace to usurp reason and to shape perception in our increasingly digitally-mediated lives. Perhaps, this realization should not come as too much of a surprise. Gibson himself recognized that the creative capacities of human beings predispose us to supplanting concrete observation with abstract concepts. A passage from Memory Palace can be read almost as claiming that the cyberspace myth fulfills some broader human teleology:

You see, so we’ve always been on our way to this new place — that is no place, really — but it is real. It’s our nature to represent. We’re the animal that represents — the sole and only maker of maps. And, if our weakness has been to confuse the bright and bloody colors of our calendars with the true weather of days, and the parchment’s territory of our maps with the land spread out before us—never mind. We have always been on our way to this new place — that is no place, really — but it is real.

Support The New Inquiry. Subscribe to TNI Magazine for $2Cyberspace is not real per se but real in the sense of the Thomas theorem: “If [wo]men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences.” Real reality is not characterized by such dualisms; it is equally made of atoms and bits. The cost of upholding this mythical separation is that we have become disassociated with many aspects of our lives. If we hope to make ourselves whole again, we first need a new vocabulary, new myths, and new representations for the Web.

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The AI Singularity is Dead; Long Live the Cybernetic Singularity : Science Not Fiction

The AI Singularity is Dead; Long Live the Cybernetic Singularity : Science Not Fiction | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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The interspecies internet: Peter Gabriel and Vint Cerf at TED2013

The interspecies internet: Peter Gabriel and Vint Cerf at TED2013 | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
In a bold talk at TED2013, Diana Reiss, Peter Gabriel, Neil Gershenfeld and Vint Cerf come together to launch the interspecies internet.

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The internet connects people all over the world. But could the internet also connect us with dolphins, apes, elephants and other highly intelligent species?

 

In a bold talk in Session 10 of TED2013, four incredible thinkers come together to launch the idea of the interspecies internet. Each takes four minutes to talk, then passes the metaphorical baton, building the narrative in parts.

 

The talk begins with Diana Reiss, a cognitive psychologist who studies intelligence in animals. She shows us a video of an adorable dolphin twirling in the water. But the dolphin isn’t spinning playfully for the camera — the dolphin is watching itself in a two-way mirror.

 

“A dolphin has self-awareness,” says Reiss. “We used to think this was a uniquely human quality, but dolphins aren’t the only non-human animals to show self-recognition in a mirror. Great apes, our closest relatives, also show this ability.” Ditto for elephants and even magpies.


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Review of Natural-Born Cyborgs

Review of Natural-Born Cyborgs | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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A cyborg, or “cybernetic organism”, was initially defined as follows: “The Cyborg deliberately incorporates exogenous components extending the self-regulating control...
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33rd Square | DARPA Looks To New Form Of Computation That Mimics The Human Brain

33rd Square | DARPA Looks To New Form Of Computation That Mimics The Human Brain | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
DARPA's Physical Intelligence program represents a potential major advance in artificial intelligence research, as the “physical intelligence” device would not require computer programming or the use of human controllers to provide directions, as...
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Toward Intelligent Humanoids | iCub 2012 | KurzweilAI

This video, released by the IDSIA Robotics Lab as part of the ongoing work in the EU-funded project IM-CLeVeR, shows recent skills learned by the iCub
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Will Google's Ray Kurzweil Live Forever?

Will Google's Ray Kurzweil Live Forever? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Holman Jenkins interviews Ray Kurzweil, the famous inventor who expects that in 15 years, medical technology will add a year of life expectancy every year.
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Your Reputation Will Be The Currency Of The Future

Your Reputation Will Be The Currency Of The Future | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
In The Nature Of The Future: Dispatches From The Socialstructed World, Marina Gorbis argues we are moving away from the depersonalized world of institutional production toward a new economy built on social connections and rewards--a process she...
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luiy's curator insight, April 10, 2013 8:09 AM

CREATING YOUR "WEB REPUTATION"

The Whuffie Bank, for example, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to building a new currency based on reputation that can be redeemed for real and virtual products and services. The term whuffie was coined by Cory Doctorow, a science fiction writer, to denote a unit of reputation-based currency in his novel Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom. The Whuffie Bank issues whuffies based on a reputation algorithm that blends information from different social networks. It aims to build a platform that measures the online reputation of contributors on various sites. “As we develop and refine the algorithm that tracks public user activity over the net, the whuffie will become an accurate reflection of your web reputation,” the site (currently offline) explains. “And as the Internet and social networks become a large part of people’s lives, your web influence will become an increasingly accurate reflection of you.”

 

The newest and most striking incarnation of this idea can be found in an online game called Empire Avenue, which simulates a stock market in which shares in individuals can be traded and one can track individuals’ market value based on their following in various social media sites, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others, as well as demand for their shares by other players.

 

Commodifying social contributions--turning these into currencies that can be accumulated, hoarded, traded, and invested--may have unintended consequences. It could undermine precisely the kind of exchanges and volunteer contributions that are integral to the gift economies they are supposed to promote. In fact the word currency may be the wrong way to describe the incentives for facilitating flows inherent to social creation. The MetaCurrency Project coined the term current-see to emphasize the social flows of the exchanges it is trying to enable. Indeed, we need to invent new language and new terminology to describe the kinds of exchanges and values that comprise core elements of social production. This puts tremendous responsibility on people who design social platforms, because it is these design elements that will determine whether the platforms will foster gift exchange, competition, generosity, or new forms of greed.

We created social technologies. Our next task is to create social organizations: systems for creating not merely goods but also meaning, purpose, and greater good. Can we imagine a society of “private wealth holders whose main objective is to lead good lives, not to turn their wealth into capital?” asks political economist Robert Skidelsky. Or better yet, might they turn their wealth into a different kind of capital—social, emotional, or spiritual? Our technologies are giving us an unprecedented opportunity to do so.

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, April 15, 2013 5:12 AM

I strongly believe that it is already now. At least I try to live up to it already some time ;-)

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Don't call it vaporware: Scientists use cloud of atoms as optical memory device (w/ video)

Don't call it vaporware: Scientists use cloud of atoms as optical memory device (w/ video) | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Talk about storing data in the cloud.
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Sentient Developments: 10 of the Weirdest Futurist Scenarios for the Evolution of Humanity

Sentient Developments: 10 of the Weirdest Futurist Scenarios for the Evolution of Humanity | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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Something Other Than Adaptation Could Be Driving Evolution | Wired Science | Wired.com

Something Other Than Adaptation Could Be Driving Evolution | Wired Science | Wired.com | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
What explains the incredible variety of life on Earth? It seems obvious. Evolution, of course! But perhaps not the evolution most people grew up with.
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E. Gabriella Coleman: Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking (2012)

E. Gabriella Coleman: Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking (2012) | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Who are computer hackers? What is free software? And what does the emergence of a community dedicated to the production of free and open source software–and to hacking as a technical, aesthet...
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Google and Neural Networks: Now Things Are Getting REALLY Interesting,...

Google and Neural Networks: Now Things Are Getting REALLY Interesting,... | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Back in October 2002, I appeared as a guest speaker for the Chicago (Illinois) URISA conference. The topic that I spoke about at that time was on the commercial and governmental applicability of ne...
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Ito: Think twice about immortality and the singularity

Ito: Think twice about immortality and the singularity | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
The director of the MIT Media Lab said sci-fi visions of computers and humans emphasize the wrong priorities for development. Technological progress should aim for resilience, not efficiency. Read this article by Stephen Shankland on CNET News.
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