The Long Poiesis
Follow
Find
3.3K views | +4 today
The Long Poiesis
Accelerating The MInd of The Future
Curated by Xaos
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

‘Neural fingerprints’ of memory associations allow ‘mind reading’ | KurzweilAI

‘Neural fingerprints’ of memory associations allow ‘mind reading’ | KurzweilAI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Researchers have begun to show that it is possible to use brain recordings to reconstruct aspects of an image or movie clip someone is viewing, a sound someone is hearing or even the text someone is reading. A new study by University of Pennsylvania and Thomas Jefferson University scientists brings this work one step closer to actual mind reading by using brain recordings to infer the way people organize associations between words in their memories.

Epilepsy patients who volunteered for the study while awaiting brain surgery had tiny electrodes implanted in their brains, which allowed researchers to precisely observe electrical signals that would not have been possible to measure outside the skull. While recording these electrical signals, the researchers asked the participants to study lists of 15 randomly chosen words and, a minute later, to repeat the words back in whichever order they came to mind.

The researchers examined the brain recordings as the participants studied each word to home in on signals in the participant’ brains that reflected the meanings of the words. About a second before the participants recalled each word, these same “meaning signals” that were identified during the study phase were spontaneously reactivated in the participants’ brains.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Google Glass and the Future of Wearable Computing

Google will release a wearable heads up display this fall, and it may help to usher in a new era of augmented reality and wearable computing. What does this mean for us as designers and developers? How do we build for the next generation of computers? Who was here before us, and how can we learn from them?

From it’s birthplace at MIT and PARC research, the field of wearable computing has focused on augmenting the human ability to compute freely. As pioneer Steve Mann and calm technology pioneer Mark Weiser wanted, “to free the human to not act as a machine”. Mann didn’t like the idea of crouching over a desktop computer. He instead felt that the computer should contort to the human naturally, so he began his own wearable computing mission.

This talk will focus on trends in wearable computing starting from the 1970’s-2010’s. I’ll cover various HUDs (heads up displays), new tech from Motorola, Google, various invasive and non-invasive tech and how mobile interfaces should take advantage of location, proximity and haptics to help improve our lives instead of get in the way. These are the machines that will be a part of our lives in only a few years from now, and the best way to learn about the future is to dig into the past.

Speech given at OSBridge 2012 by Amber Case: http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/857

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The Cyborg Pocket

The Cyborg Pocket | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

The term cyborg has become so ingrained in popular culture that the invocation of it instantly reminds many people of bad science fiction, the kind produced long enough ago that it represented the future in a year that we’ve already left behind us. More often than not, the term has become a throw-away line for unimaginative script writers, and many of us now associate it with cheesy sci-fi rather than real technological development. The reality, however, is that cyborgs are already all around us, and have been for years, but unlike the gaudy killer robots in the movies, our cyborg neighbors of today are much less threatening and much more mundane.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

'A Perfect and Beautiful Machine': What Darwin's Theory of Evolution Reveals About Artificial Intelligence

'A Perfect and Beautiful Machine': What Darwin's Theory of Evolution Reveals About Artificial Intelligence | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Charles Darwin and Alan Turing, in their different ways, both homed in on the same idea: the existence of competence without comprehension.Some of the greatest, most revolutionary advances in science have been given their initial expression in attractively modest terms, with no fanfare.

Charles Darwin managed to compress his entire theory into a single summary paragraph that a layperson can readily follow.

Francis Crick and James Watson closed their epoch-making paper on the structure of DNA with a single deliciously diffident sentence. ("It has not escaped our notice that the specific pairings we have postulated immediately suggests a possible copying mechanism for the replicating unit of life.")

And Alan Turing created a new world of science and technology, setting the stage for solving one of the most baffling puzzles remaining to science, the mind-body problem, with an even shorter declarative sentence in the middle of his 1936 paper on computable numbers:

It is possible to invent a single machine which can be used to compute any computable sequence.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

GoFlow: a DIY tDCS brain-boosting kit | ExtremeTech

GoFlow: a DIY tDCS brain-boosting kit | ExtremeTech | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Did you know that by attaching a 9-volt battery to your scalp -- with the help of some electrodes and some wet sponges (or conducting gel) -- you can more than double your brain's learning rate and boost peak performance?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The Cognitive Systems Era

Join IBM's Dharmendra Modha - Manager, Cognitive Computing Systems and Master Inventor - as he offers a glimpse of IBM Research's efforts to help shape the new age of cognitive computing.More simply stated, it is an attempt to build a new kind of computer with similar form and function to the mammalian brain. Such artificial brains would be used to build robots whose intelligence matches that of mice and cats.

SyNAPSE is a backronym standing for Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics. It started in 2008 and as of June 2012 has received $102.6 million in funding. It is scheduled to run until around 2016. The project is contracted to IBM, HRL Laboratories, and four US universities: California Merced, Columbia University Medical Center, Cornell, and Wisconsin-Madison. he program is currently progressing through phase 2 - as of June 2012.

This involves, among other things, designing a multi-chip system capable of emulating 1 million neurons and 1 billion synapses. The program requirements are that no phase last longer than 18 months. This means the million-neuron design should be completed by February 2013. Construction of the system will come in phase 3, to be completed around August 2014.

The ultimate aim is to build an electronic microprocessor system that matches a mammalian brain in function, size, and power consumption. It should recreate 10 billion neurons, 100 trillion synapses, consume one kilowatt (same as a small electric heater), and occupy less than two liters of space.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Artificial Organ Regrowth - "Nova: Can We Live Forever?"

We are getting one step closer to be less reliant on organ transplant lists.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Replacing Synapses with a Single Switch « NextNature.net

Replacing Synapses with a Single Switch « NextNature.net | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Neural synapses in the human brain are extraordinarily complex structures. Responsible for relaying information between neurons, chemical synapses govern the release of over 100 different kinds of neurotransmitters, while electrical synapses deliver information via electricity for rapid-fire reflexes.

Now, researchers in Japan have invented a simplified synapse in the form of a ”solid-state electrochemical nanodevice” that functions as a switch. The gap between these two synthetic synapses is bridged by a tiny copper wire, which changes in conductivity over time. Though at first it may seem a bit esoteric, this new device actually mimics what goes on in the construction of sensory memory, short-term memory, and long-term memory. The scientists behind this synapse are hopeful that it will lead to more life-like artificial minds, as well as treatments for the human brain.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

A Countdown to a Digital Simulation of Every Last Neuron in the Human Brain: Scientific American

A Countdown to a Digital Simulation of Every Last Neuron in the Human Brain: Scientific American | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Reductionist biology—examining individual brain parts, neural circuits and molecules—has brought us a long way, but it alone cannot explain the workings of the human brain, an information processor within our skull that is perhaps unparalleled anywhere in the universe. We must construct as well as reduce and build as well as dissect. To do that, we need a new paradigm that combines both analysis and synthesis. The father of reductionism, French philosopher René Descartes, wrote about the need to investigate the parts and then reassemble them to re-create the whole.

Putting things together to devise a complete simulation of the human brain is the goal of an undertaking that intends to construct a fantastic new scientific instrument. Nothing quite like it exists yet, but we have begun building it. One way to think of this instrument is as the most powerful flight simulator ever built—only rather than simulating flight through open air, it will simulate a voyage through the brain. This “virtual brain” will run on supercomputers and incorporate all the data that neuroscience has generated to date.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Interview with Lex Pott ー | HITSPAPER™ : INTERVIEW

Interview with Lex Pott ー | HITSPAPER™ : INTERVIEW | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Lex: I use materials found in nature as my primairy materials. Tables, and shelves result from combining the original structure of a tree with its industrial by-products. At the junction between table leg and top, the transition from tree trunk to geometric shape becomes visible. The compound of organic and symmetrical forms challenges the binary divide between nature and culture that underlies traditional design. It also reveals the organic origin of many industrially-produced items. I try to bring design back to nature. My work explores the boundaries between art and design, function and story, object and imagination. I would like to keep this experimental formula of working as long as it creates unexpected results. As a starting point, I use raw materials from nature as the basis of my work. There is also an uncontrolled part in my designs and a rational geometric part. The tension between all these aspects should be in perfect harmony otherwise it just doesn’t work. Most of the time, when people try to create a spontaneous form it doesn’t work or it feels very forced. By letting nature determine the irregularity I can isolate my act of design to be sharper and clearer. The thing that fascinates me in nature is the fact that it is never static. It is a continually moving process that grows in an organic way. Besides this, I would love to develop my Fragments of Nature furniture towards the industry and production and find the right manufacter.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

TEDxVasastan-Anders Sandberg-What kind of humanity should we want to make?.mp4

Dr Anders Sandberg is a researcher at the Future of Humanity Institute at the University of Oxford. With a background in computer science and computational biology Anders now dedicates most of his research on the social and ethical implications of new technologies, especially methods for improving human and artificial intelligence. Anders research also revolves around global disasters and how to deal with them rationally. In addition to his academic achievements, Anders is also a dedicated science popularizer. He was previously a science producer for the exhibition "Se Hjärnan!" which toured in Sweden 2005-2007, was co-founder of the think tank Eudoxa and is also research associate at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, Oxford Centre for Neuro Ethics and the James Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Helen Papagiannis, Google Glass, and a new aesthetics of augmented reality

Helen Papagiannis, Google Glass, and a new aesthetics of augmented reality | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

*I dunno if I agree with what Helen is venturing here, but this work is both necessary and interesting.*In the long run, it can’t be about a particular gizmo or service like Google Glass or Microsoft Photosynth. The New Aesthetic issue of “seeing like machines” will boil down to aesthetics. Issues of perception, interpretation, visualization and “reality.”

*James Bridle’s “moodboard for unknown products” is behind us now, but those “unknown products” are showing up in sudden heaps, while a genuine new aesthetic is still some good distance ahead of us.

*I’m guessing that Helen’s approaches will come to mainstream fruition in the 2020s, rather than the 2010s. All the more reason to pay heed and get to work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Harry Halpin - Artificial Intelligence Versus Collective Intelligence

Harry Halpin - Artificial Intelligence Versus Collective Intelligence | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Early in the history of computing, pioneers such as Alan Turing and John McCarthy
subscribed to the vision that either the human mind was itself computational or could
be simulated via a computer. If this hypothesis, dubbed "artificial intelligence," is
true, then humans could easily be replaced by suitable AI computers, which were
typically envisaged as robots. To historicize the period of AI in the 1950s and 1960s,
AI was conceived as a technological solution to the problem of labour in an era of full
employment and traditional factory production. Attempts to renew AI by abandoning
the notion of representation and focusing on embodied systems have produced more
biologically plausible robots and a more accurate view of human intelligence, but
have never come to fruition: to date, there is no human-level intelligence that is
simulated purely computationally. However there exists a separate and forgotten
stream of work that started at the same time as McCarthy and Minsky's AI project in
the 1950s: the Human Augmentation Project of Douglas Engelbart to achieve
collective intelligence. Instead of attempting to replicate human intelligence,
Engelbart sought to augment existing human intelligence via computational functions
that complemented human intelligence. Despite being ignored by philosophy of the
mind and computation, it is precisely this project that has achieved long-standing
historical impact: from the invention of the mouse to the inception of the World Wide
Web. In fact, in an era of mass unemployment and distributed labor, while AI-enabled
robots are economically unfeasible, social computation as exemplified by crowdsourcing
via the Web is now central to the modern economy. However, unlike AI,
Engelbart's thesis

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

6 mechanisms that will help create the global brain | Trends in the Living Networks

6 mechanisms that will help create the global brain | Trends in the Living Networks | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

One of the many reasons humanity is at an inflection point is that the age-old dream of the “global brain” is finally becoming a reality.

I explored the idea in my book Living Networks, and at more length in my piece Autopoiesis and how hyper-connectivity is literally bringing the networks to life.

Today, my work on crowdsourcing is largely focused on the emerging mechanisms that allow us to create better results from mass participation.

Some of the best work being done in the space is at the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence. A few of their researchers (including founder Thomas Malone) have just written a short paper Programming the Global Brain.

I don’t think “programming” is the best metaphor. I prefer to think about the enabling structures and mechanisms out of which collective intelligence will be created.

However programming can be a useful frame, and in the paper the authors propose six programming metaphors that will facilitate the formation of the global brain:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

George Dyson on Singularity 1 on 1

George Dyson (born 1953) is an author and historian of technology whose publications broadly cover the evolution of technology in relation to the physical environment and the direction of society. He has written on wide topics that include the history of computing, the development of algorithms and intelligence, communication systems, space exploration, and the design of water craft.

Lecturing widely at academic institutions, corporations, and high-tech conferences, Dyson gives a historical context to the evolution of technology in modern society and provides thought-provoking ideas on the directions in which technology, such as the Internet, might develop.

Dyson was a visiting lecturer and research associate at Western Washington University's Fairhaven College and was Director’s Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, in 2002-03. He is a frequent contributor to the Edge Foundation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Morals and the machine via the Economist

Morals and the machine via the Economist | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

 

As robots grow more autonomous, society needs to develop rules to manage them

Jun 2nd 2012 | from the print edition

IN THE classic science-fiction film “2001”, the ship’s computer, HAL, faces a dilemma. His instructions require him both to fulfil the ship’s mission (investigating an artefact near Jupiter) and to keep the mission’s true purpose secret from the ship’s crew. To resolve the contradiction, he tries to kill the crew. As robots become more autonomous, the notion of computer-controlled machines facing ethical decisions is moving out of the realm of science fiction and into the real world. Society needs to find ways to ensure that they are better equipped to make moral judgments than HAL was.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Experience with Carsten Höller | PRIMO! Magazine

Experience with Carsten Höller | PRIMO! Magazine | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Like a theme park for inquisitive, brainy grown-ups, artist and scientist Carsten Höller’s exhibit at The New Museum, NY will turn your understanding of the world in on itself and remind you what it’s like to delight in discovery.

Coming from an art-based background, I find it difficult not to argue reasons for why everything in the world can be classified as an artwork. I have spoken before to experimental scientists whose installations are concerned with human psychology and audience interaction, and always in my questions is the implication that what they do counts as art. They usually shut me down pretty quickly, insisting that while their work manifests in aesthetically pleasing museum displays, their installations are simply vehicles that allow them to explore their hypotheses. I nod, because I have to, but inside I’m wriggling with frustrated denial. I don’t know how to understand science, but I get art. I want their work to be art so I can feel included.

The beauty of this kind of work, however, is that regardless of how it’s classified, everybody is included. Provided you posses the curiosity inherent in our species, scientifically experimental installations are merely intelligently crafted sculptures until you – the audience and the variable – step in to play with them. Artist and sometimes scientist Carsten Höller uses this fact as the basis of his latest exhibition, Experience. Housed by The New Museum in New York, the exhibition teases and toys with our expectations of sensory experience, provoking curiosity and causing disorientation in its audiences. Works include a sensory deprivation tank, a 102-foot slide that sends the slider plummeting through several floors of the museum, and a mirrored carousel similar to the one that flung you annually into centrifugal surrender and subsequent nausea at the Easter Show.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Welcome to the Hybrid Age - By Ayesha and Parag Khanna

Welcome to the Hybrid Age - By Ayesha and Parag Khanna | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

One 26-year-old says more than half his memories come from his online life. A Japanese man marries a voluptuous digital avatar. A corporate laboratory implants memories in 7-year-olds, convincing them they swam with dolphins. In their minds, they even got wet.

Even for our greatest philosopher of the surreal, Sigmund Freud, reality remained rooted in the personal and social. A century on, however, technology is granting us the ability to alter our perception of reality, construct multiple representations of ourselves like avatars, and have relationships with artificial agents like robots. All of these are simultaneously expanding and destabilizing our sense of self.

Technology is a “second self,” as MIT professor Sherry Turkle has explained: a new interface between us and others. Debates over whether social technologies cause “detachment” from reality miss the point that we are entering a new hybrid reality in which assumptions about authenticity are fundamentally challenged: Who is real? What is the line between physical and virtual? Do we each get to live our own version of the truth?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Inviting Machines Into Our Bodies | Hybrid Reality | Big Think | By Chris Arkenberg

Inviting Machines Into Our Bodies | Hybrid Reality | Big Think | By Chris Arkenberg | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

In what amounts to a fairly shocking reminder of how quickly our technologies are advancing and how deeply our lives are being woven with networked computation, security researchers have recently reported successes in remotely compromising and controlling two different medical implant devices . Such implanted devices are becoming more and more common, implemented with wireless communications both across components and outward to monitors that allow doctors to non-invasively make changes to their settings. Until only recently, this technology was mostly confined to advanced labs but it is now moving steadily into our bodies. As these procedures become more common, researchers are now considering the security implications of wiring human anatomy directly into the web of ubiquitous computation and networked communications.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Polleni » Imaginary Beings. Mythologies of the Not Yet.

Polleni » Imaginary Beings. Mythologies of the Not Yet. | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Selected as one of “the 100 most creative people” by Fast Company, and named as one of the “top 20 most influential architects to shape our future”, Neri Oxman is also professor of media arts and sciences at the MIT Media Lab, where she directs the Mediated Matter research group. Not only is she brilliant, but she also is dazzlingly gorgeous…
With her team, she explores how digital design and fabrication technologies mediate between material and the environment to radically transform the design and construction of objects, buildings and systems.

We had the opportunity to discover en avant première her latest work, “Imaginary Beings – Mythologies of the Not Yet” at an event organized by Objet, her sponsor.
18 prototypes for the human body have been built on Objet printers, each inspired by an ancient mythology. All of them investigate the relation between artificial and nature, how one can be enhanced and eventually how to give life to phantasies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The Value of a Happiness Economy by John Havens

The Value of a Happiness Economy by John Havens | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

What if generosity were a currency? This was a question posed by the Danish chocolate company Anthon Berg for its recent Generous Store campaign. The company opened a pop-up store for one day in Copenhagen last winter, and distributed chocolate as payment to individuals who promised to perform a generous deed for a loved one.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

The Collective Intelligence Revolution | Puck – Your Local Heroes

The Collective Intelligence Revolution | Puck – Your Local Heroes | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Now researchers from around the world are organising the first international conference dedicated to “Harnessing collective intelligence with games“, to be held in September this year in Germany. The conference is aimed at ...

Via Spaceweaver
more...
Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, January 31, 2014 9:56 AM

 first international conference dedicated to “Harnessing collective intelligence with games“, to be held in September this year in Germany.

Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Katalyst vs. Singularity: a radical exploration into a subject of our times | KurzweilAI

Katalyst vs. Singularity: a radical exploration into a subject of our times | KurzweilAI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Interview with Ray Kurzweil - There’s an inherent fear in hearing “the human era will be ended.” How do you think people today can cope with this possible future?

I don’t describe it that way, at all, at least not with that terminology. In my view, the technology we are creating is part of the human civilization. Life expectancy was 20 [years] one-thousand years ago, and we’re ultimately literally physically merging with these machines, we’re going to put them inside our bodies and brains as I just said, and I think that’s an arbitrary distinction because we’re very intimate with our computers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Will our kids be a different species? Juan Enriquez via K21ST

Will our kids be a different species? Juan Enriquez via K21ST | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

At TEDxSummit, Juan Enriquez sweeps across time and space to bring us to the present moment — and shows how technology is revealing evidence that suggests rapid evolution may be under way.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Self As Symbol - Science News, by Tom Siegfried

Self As Symbol - Science News, by Tom Siegfried | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

This essay is part of Demystifying the Mind, a special report on the new science of consciousness. The next installments will appear in the February 25 and March 10 issues of Science News.

When Francis Crick decided to embark on a scientific research career, he chose his specialty by applying the “gossip test.” He’d noticed that he liked to gossip about two especially hot topics in the 1940s — the molecular basis for heredity and the mysteries of the brain. He decided to tackle biology’s molecules first. By 1953, with collaborator James Watson (and aided by data from competitor Rosalind Franklin), Crick had identified the structure of the DNA molecule, establishing the foundation for modern genetics.

A quarter century later, he decided it was time to try the path not taken and turn his attention to the brain — in particular, the enigma of consciousness.

more...
No comment yet.