The Long Poiesis
Follow
Find
3.0K views | +5 today
Scooped by Xaos
onto The Long Poiesis
Scoop.it!

FutureMed: The Future of Health

This archive file was compiled from audio and video documentation of a gathering of medical professionals, inventors & entrepreneurs, held at Singularity University…
more...
No comment yet.
The Long Poiesis
Accelerating The MInd of The Future
Curated by Xaos
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The Next 20 Years Are Going To Make The Last 20 Look Like We Accomplished Nothing In Tech

The Next 20 Years Are Going To Make The Last 20 Look Like We Accomplished Nothing In Tech | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
"20 years from now we'll look back and say, 'Well, nothing really happened in the last 20 years,'" predicts founding Wired editor Kevin Kelly.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

MIT's cooking up robots that can assemble themselves in the oven

MIT's cooking up robots that can assemble themselves in the oven | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
It's 2050, and you're prepping the oven to bake your next robotic minion while a 3D printer spews out its components. Wait a sec... bake a robot? As
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Biotech's Brave New World: Push One To Create Life; Push Two To Create Alien Life

Biotech's Brave New World: Push One To Create Life; Push Two To Create Alien Life | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
It’s been a good month for miracles. And by miracles I mean our oldest miracle, that first miracle, the creation of life itself.

During these
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Karl Schroeder: The Singularity is an Old Idea. Keep Moving Forward!

Karl Schroeder: The Singularity is an Old Idea. Keep Moving Forward! | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Futurist and sci fi author Karl Schroeder argues that the singularity is only one among many ways of looking at the future and that we must develop other lenses and keep looking for new ideas and blind-spots.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

Nick Bostrom Explores Superintelligence in His New Book

Nick Bostrom Explores Superintelligence in His New Book | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
 Artificial Intelligence In Superintelligence, the new book from futurist thinker Nick Bostrom,  a variety of intellectual models are used to explore what will happen when machines exceed human...
[[ This is a content summary only.

Via Spaceweaver
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 29, 3:31 PM

And, thus, the human species as we know it will fade out of existence, while a new one fades in.

 

Society will, I think, be more likely biased in favor of those who adapt the new technology, as opposed to those who don't, kind of like how drivers with corrected vision are more favored than those with impairments are not.

 

Hopefully, the notion of the universally rational human being is dead; destroyed in our mind's eye by a wave of psychological, sociological, economic and biological research, personal observation and experience.  Our biological brains are imperfect tools at best at sensing the whole of the universe.  Worse still, is that we don't know if there is a limit to the universe.  After all, there could be things that we cannot perceive or conceive with our current biological, sociological and cosmological make up.  How could we ever, with confidence, say that we've got EVERYTHING figured out definitively, even with these potential technological corrections?

 

Unfortunately, the worst offenders amongst us, those who perceive the universe less accurately than others, are likely to be the most stubborn amongst us at accepting and working with the new technological changes that could be coming down the pike.  These are the people who will be left behind and less favored by society and the natural universe, as those with the greater cognitive and potentially physical abilities get ahead faster and more often in our societies than those who don't.  These are the people who could, hypothetically, lash out against those who are adapting to the changes in knowledge that we get into the brain and robotics.  While they could win the war against the next generation of humanity, they are also likely to be more prone to self-destruction, thanks to the uncorrected "vision" as it were of their view of the universe and how things are and how things work.  They'll crash into that rock and die, while those who had corrected vision could have avoided it.

 

So, while I wouldn't want to be an early adapter of the new technology as it comes out, I also wouldn't want to be at the tail end of adapting it.  Those who have honestly contemplated themselves and the universe as a whole are more likely to acknowledge, be aware of and desire to fix their persistent mistakes and errors, while those who think they've got everything are more likely to not see their potential pitfalls and thus, not correct them appropriately, effectively or in time to save themselves.  I think that this should all be done by choice.  But I also think that things will progress to a point that you won't have a choice, if you're interested in being able to survive and succeed in our society.  New becomes old, new eclipses the old: cycle of life and the universe.

 

Quite frankly, I'd rather have my "vision" of how the world is corrected than leave it to chance alone.  I don't think I'm perfect as I am; my ego doesn't allow me to think like that.  Only then could we, I think, potentially begin to cope with the magnitude of the universe, what is and how it all works.

 

I hope that this technology comes to fruition at the appropriate time, if not for my own sake, then for our descendants' sake.

 

 

Jens Hoffmann's curator insight, May 6, 12:06 AM

In Superintelligence, the new book from futurist thinker Nick Bostrom,  a variety of intellectual models are used to explore what will happen when machines exceed human intelligence.

Read more: http://www.33rdsquare.com/2014/04/nick-bostrom-explores-superintelligence.html#ixzz30ut5gUPC 
Follow us: @33rdsquare on Twitter | 33rdsquare on Facebook

Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Will superhuman powers give us superhuman problems?

Will superhuman powers give us superhuman problems? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
As different human enhancement technologies advance at different rates, they bleed into society gradually and without fanfare. What's more, they will increa...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines

Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Our robot overlords are already here. We’re just anthropomorphizing our technology in more subtle ways than we’d imagined in the past.

Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The Future of Being Human

The Future of Being Human | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

A Revolution in Money

A Revolution in Money | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Futurists predict a revolution in the tenets of finance in the coming decades, similar to the changes that have been sweeping the information and telecommunications industries.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

How the Web Will Implode

How the Web Will Implode | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Jeff Stibel is either a genius when it comes to titles, or has one hell of an editor. The name of his recent book Breakpoint: Why the web will implode, search will be obsolete, and everything you need to know about technology is in your brain was about as intriguing as I had found a title, at least since The Joys of X. In many ways, the book delivers on the promise of its title, making an incredibly compelling argument for how we should be looking at the trend lines in technology, a book which is chalk full of surprising and original observations.

Via Spaceweaver
more...
Spaceweaver's curator insight, March 23, 7:58 AM

Interesting read about the future of the web... (not good probably....)

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, March 24, 12:29 PM

Sound really worth reading, if only for inspiration. I am putting it on my wishlist.

Viktoras Veitas's comment, March 25, 12:56 AM
Good: Stibel, brain scientist and entrepreneur, compares the Internet to the human brain as a network, and, as with all networks, the Internet is approaching a break point, along with many technologies and businesses that rely on it. Yet, as in nature, the break point will bring better things because “the fittest species are typically the smallest. . . . The unit of measure for progress isn’t size, it’s time.” We learn that post-break-point technology networks (he cites the Internet, the web, and Facebook) are just tools to further connect humans more deeply while encouraging and enhancing equality, since social media promotes democracy. The author contends that technology networks must encourage growth at all costs and avoid monetization too early, which requires patience but also requires “shifting gears” once the break point is reached. He suggests that “technology is on the verge of creating the types of things habitually reserved for humans: consciousness, intelligence, and emotion.” A fascinating book with important ideas for a wide range of library patrons. --Mary Whaley
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The Pentagon Basically Wants to Merge You With a Robot

The Pentagon Basically Wants to Merge You With a Robot | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
From artificial mammal brains to prosthetics that feel like real limbs, the military’s blue-sky researchers are aiming to bring man and machine closer than ever before.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Human Longevity Inc. launched to promote healthy aging using advances in genomics and stem-cell therapies | KurzweilAI

Human Longevity Inc. launched to promote healthy aging using advances in genomics and stem-cell therapies | KurzweilAI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Human Longevity Inc. (HLI), a genomics and cell therapy-based diagnostic and therapeutic company focused on extending the healthy, high performance human
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

A Crazy Oculus Rift Hack Lets Men and Women Swap Bodies | Wired Design | Wired.com

"Deep inside you know it’s not your body, but you feel like it is," says Philippe Bertrand.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

We Will End Disability by Becoming Cyborgs - IEEE Spectrum

We Will End Disability by Becoming Cyborgs - IEEE Spectrum | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Neural interfaces and prosthetics will do away with biology’s failings
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from The future of medicine and health
Scoop.it!

Can the Nervous System Be Hacked?

Can the Nervous System Be Hacked? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Welcome to the brave new world of bioelectronics: implants that can communicate directly with the nervous system in order to try to fight everything from cancer to the common cold.

..

Conceptually, bioelectronics is straightforward: Get the nervous system to tell the body to heal itself. But of course it’s not that simple. “What we’re trying to do here is completely novel,” says Pedro Irazoqui, a professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue University, where he’s investigating bioelectronic therapies for epilepsy. Jay Pasricha, a professor of medicine and neurosciences at Johns Hopkins University who studies how nerve signals affect obesity, diabetes and gastrointestinal-motility disorders, among other digestive diseases, says, “What we’re doing today is like the precursor to the Model T.”


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Life After New Media: Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska

Life After New Media: Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Interview with media theorists Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska by Janneke Adema and Ben Craggs. The interview focuses on Kember and Zylinska's recently published co-authored monograph Life After New Media: Mediation as a Vital Process. Topics of conversat...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from e.cloud
Scoop.it!

Vascular Networks Make Self-healing possible in Composites

Vascular Networks Make Self-healing possible in Composites | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

"One of the more intriguing capabilities in nature is, however, the number of biological systems that are able to self heal. Scientists, spurred on by the potential economic benefits of materials that would be able to repair themselves  - longer lifetime, lower maintenance costs and more efficiency - have worked to develop self-healing systems for various materials, including plastics. And with success: various polymers are now available which have  the intrinsic ability to repair damage caused by usage over time. Up until now, however, composites, were a whole different ballgame. But once again, nature showed the way."


Via Miguel Prazeres, Alessio Erioli
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Watch as swarms of micro-robots run around making stuff

Watch as swarms of micro-robots run around making stuff | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Swarms or tiny micro-robots are being developed to build tiny assemblies.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from The future of medicine and health
Scoop.it!

Scientists make first embryo clones from adults.

Scientists make first embryo clones from adults. | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Scientists for the first time have cloned cells from two adults to create early-stage embryos, and then derived tissue from those embryos that perfectly matched the DNA of the donors.

The experiment represents another advance in the quest to make tissue in the laboratory that could treat a range of maladies, from heart attacks to Alzheimer's. The study, involving a 35-year-old man and one age 75, was published Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

The creation of the first early-stage human clones, using infant and fetal cells rather than those from adults, was reported last year. The new experiment, with a few tweaks, confirms that striking and controversial breakthrough and also shows the technique works on mature cells.

"The proportion of diseases you can treat with [lab-made tissue] increases with age. So if you can't do this with adult cells, it is of limited value," said Robert Lanza, co-author of the study and chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology Inc. ACTC +1.43% of Marlborough, Mass. The study was funded in part by the government of Korea and done at a lab in California.

Such experiments are controversial because when cells are extracted from an early-stage human embryo, it destroys the embryo, which some people believe is equivalent to taking a life.

Scientists for the first time have cloned cells from two adults to create early-stage embryos, and then derived tissue from those embryos that perfectly matched the DNA of the donors.

Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

DARPA’s New Biotech Unit Will Try To Create New Life Forms | Alternative

DARPA’s New Biotech Unit Will Try To Create New Life Forms | Alternative | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Yes, sci-fi writers hard up for new material should spend an hour or so perusing the Defense Department’s 2015 budget proposal, especially the section covering the far-out research projects underway at DARPA, where the agency’s mad scientists are...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

Now You Can Build Google’s $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Enterprise | WIRED

Now You Can Build Google’s $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Enterprise | WIRED | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Andrew Ng wants to bring deep learning -- an emerging computer science field that seeks to mimic the human brain with hardware and software -- into the DIY era. ("Low-cost" neural nets on gpus.

Via Spaceweaver
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Age of Wonder: Superintelligence and existential risks - we make money not art

Age of Wonder: Superintelligence and existential risks - we make money not art | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Cyborg Lives
Scoop.it!

Perfect memory, enhanced vision, an expert golf swing: The future of brain implants

Perfect memory, enhanced vision, an expert golf swing: The future of brain implants | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
How soon can we expect to see brain implants for perfect memory, enhanced vision, hypernormal focus or an expert golf swing? We're closer than you might think.

-

What would you give for a retinal chip that let you see in the dark or for a next-generation cochlear implant that let you hear any conversation in a noisy restaurant, no matter how loud? Or for a memory chip, wired directly into your brain's hippocampus, that gave you perfect recall of everything you read? Or for an implanted interface with the Internet that automatically translated a clearly articulated silent thought ("the French sun king") into an online search that digested the relevant Wikipedia page and projected a summary directly into your brain?

Science fiction? Perhaps not for very much longer. Brain implants today are where laser eye surgery was several decades ago. They are not risk-free and make sense only for a narrowly defined set of patients—but they are a sign of things to come.

Unlike pacemakers, dental crowns or implantable insulin pumps, neuroprosthetics—devices that restore or supplement the mind's capacities with electronics inserted directly into the nervous system—change how we perceive the world and move through it. For better or worse, these devices become part of who we are.

Neuroprosthetics aren't new. They have been around commercially for three decades, in the form of the cochlear implants used in the ears (the outer reaches of the nervous system) of more than 300,000 hearing-impaired people around the world. Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first retinal implant, made by the company Second Sight.

Both technologies exploit the same principle: An external device, either a microphone or a video camera, captures sounds or images and processes them, using the results to drive a set of electrodes that stimulate either the auditory or the optic nerve, approximating the naturally occurring output from the ear or the eye.


Via Wildcat2030
more...
LaTisha Hockensmith's curator insight, March 16, 3:17 PM

Oh, my! What has this world come to?

Rescooped by Xaos from Cyborgs_Transhumanism
Scoop.it!

Between Ape and Artilect. Pioneers of Artificial Intelligence | #nano #AI #cyborgs #FreeBook

Between Ape and Artilect. Pioneers of Artificial Intelligence | #nano #AI #cyborgs #FreeBook | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, luiy
more...
luiy's curator insight, March 8, 11:34 AM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

aanve's curator insight, March 8, 7:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 7:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Futurium - European Commission

Futurium - European Commission | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
One platform, Your voices, Our Futures
more...
No comment yet.