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Brain-machine Interface: A Multi-disciplinary Approach Shows Progress - Dana Foundation

Brain-machine Interface: A Multi-disciplinary Approach Shows Progress - Dana Foundation | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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Recent news reports have described what sounds like a miracle--restoring the ability of a paralyzed woman “to feed herself chocolate and move everyday items using a robotic arm directly controlled by thought, showing a level of agility and control approaching that of a human limb.”1 In fact, neuroscientists have actually made this possible by defining the specific steps in this process: (1) identifying those brain signals that contain the requisite movement signal information for such use; (2) developing suitable means to record those signals safely and continuously; (3) extracting the essential motor command information by computer processing of the neural signals; (4) designing, developing and constructing a prosthetic arm that performs nearly all of the functions of the human arm; (5) interfacing the processed brain signals to the device, creating an integrated Brain-Machine Interface (BMI); (6) and finally improving the quality and effectiveness of the BMI by training the brain to operate the prosthetic limb.  The latter phase of training also evaluates additional brain signals and additional features built into the device to improve brain-machine communication and enhance the brain-machine integration.  The resultant operations achieve more accurate, faster and enduring usefulness of the prosthetic device1,2.

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Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines

Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Our robot overlords are already here. We’re just anthropomorphizing our technology in more subtle ways than we’d imagined in the past.

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The Future of Being Human

The Future of Being Human | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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A Revolution in Money

A Revolution in Money | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Futurists predict a revolution in the tenets of finance in the coming decades, similar to the changes that have been sweeping the information and telecommunications industries.
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How the Web Will Implode

How the Web Will Implode | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Jeff Stibel is either a genius when it comes to titles, or has one hell of an editor. The name of his recent book Breakpoint: Why the web will implode, search will be obsolete, and everything you need to know about technology is in your brain was about as intriguing as I had found a title, at least since The Joys of X. In many ways, the book delivers on the promise of its title, making an incredibly compelling argument for how we should be looking at the trend lines in technology, a book which is chalk full of surprising and original observations.

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, March 23, 7:58 AM

Interesting read about the future of the web... (not good probably....)

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, March 24, 12:29 PM

Sound really worth reading, if only for inspiration. I am putting it on my wishlist.

Viktoras Veitas's comment, March 25, 12:56 AM
Good: Stibel, brain scientist and entrepreneur, compares the Internet to the human brain as a network, and, as with all networks, the Internet is approaching a break point, along with many technologies and businesses that rely on it. Yet, as in nature, the break point will bring better things because “the fittest species are typically the smallest. . . . The unit of measure for progress isn’t size, it’s time.” We learn that post-break-point technology networks (he cites the Internet, the web, and Facebook) are just tools to further connect humans more deeply while encouraging and enhancing equality, since social media promotes democracy. The author contends that technology networks must encourage growth at all costs and avoid monetization too early, which requires patience but also requires “shifting gears” once the break point is reached. He suggests that “technology is on the verge of creating the types of things habitually reserved for humans: consciousness, intelligence, and emotion.” A fascinating book with important ideas for a wide range of library patrons. --Mary Whaley
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The Pentagon Basically Wants to Merge You With a Robot

The Pentagon Basically Wants to Merge You With a Robot | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
From artificial mammal brains to prosthetics that feel like real limbs, the military’s blue-sky researchers are aiming to bring man and machine closer than ever before.
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Human Longevity Inc. launched to promote healthy aging using advances in genomics and stem-cell therapies | KurzweilAI

Human Longevity Inc. launched to promote healthy aging using advances in genomics and stem-cell therapies | KurzweilAI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Human Longevity Inc. (HLI), a genomics and cell therapy-based diagnostic and therapeutic company focused on extending the healthy, high performance human
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A Crazy Oculus Rift Hack Lets Men and Women Swap Bodies | Wired Design | Wired.com

"Deep inside you know it’s not your body, but you feel like it is," says Philippe Bertrand.
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Nanomotors that are controlled, for the first time, inside living cells | KurzweilAI

Nanomotors that are controlled, for the first time, inside living cells | KurzweilAI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Penn State University chemists and engineers have, for the first time, placed tiny synthetic motors inside live human cells in a lab, propelled them with ultrasonic waves, and steered them magnetically.

The Penn State nanomotors are the closest so far to a “Fantastic Voyage” concept (without the miniature people).

The nanomotors, which are rocket-shaped gold rods ~300 nanometers in diameter and ~3 microns long, move around inside the cells, spinning and battering against the cell membrane.

The nanomotors are activated by resonant ultrasound operating at ~4 MHz, and show axial propulsion as well as spinning.

 


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5 FUTURE FORECASTS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD - SERIOUS WONDER

5 FUTURE FORECASTS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD - SERIOUS WONDER | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
5 FUTURE FORECASTS THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD - Gray Scott for Serious Wonder

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Connected Air: Smart Dust Is The Future Of The Quantified World

Connected Air: Smart Dust Is The Future Of The Quantified World | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
They call it Smart Dust, but these microscopic sensors could change the way we interact with the world.

Via Alessio Erioli
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amleto picerno 's curator insight, November 16, 2013 6:11 AM
Smart Dust: The Sensors That Track Every Thing, Everywhere
Miro Svetlik's curator insight, November 17, 2013 1:01 AM

Idea of Smart Dust heavily surpasses the concept of Internet of Things. It is still quite unbelievable that this is a technology from 90-ties. Big clouds of motes could soon be flying near us. Let's hope they will be used for good purposes..

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Mars One introduction film (updated version)

This movie shows how Mars One plans to establish a human settlement on Mars in 2023. Click on the red button [=] in the bottom to change the subtitles. For m...
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The Man Who First Said 'Cyborg,' 50 Years Later

The Man Who First Said 'Cyborg,' 50 Years Later | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
In September 1960, Manfred Clynes coined the word cyborg. We talk with the 85-year old about brain signals, treacherous words, precise music and how to transmit meaning.
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A New Programming Language That Can Shape Our DNA

A New Programming Language That Can Shape Our DNA | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Get ready for a time when telling a cell to do something is as easy as coding a website.

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DARPA’s New Biotech Unit Will Try To Create New Life Forms | Alternative

DARPA’s New Biotech Unit Will Try To Create New Life Forms | Alternative | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Yes, sci-fi writers hard up for new material should spend an hour or so perusing the Defense Department’s 2015 budget proposal, especially the section covering the far-out research projects underway at DARPA, where the agency’s mad scientists are...
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Now You Can Build Google’s $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Enterprise | WIRED

Now You Can Build Google’s $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Enterprise | WIRED | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Andrew Ng wants to bring deep learning -- an emerging computer science field that seeks to mimic the human brain with hardware and software -- into the DIY era. ("Low-cost" neural nets on gpus.

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Age of Wonder: Superintelligence and existential risks - we make money not art

Age of Wonder: Superintelligence and existential risks - we make money not art | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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Perfect memory, enhanced vision, an expert golf swing: The future of brain implants

Perfect memory, enhanced vision, an expert golf swing: The future of brain implants | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
How soon can we expect to see brain implants for perfect memory, enhanced vision, hypernormal focus or an expert golf swing? We're closer than you might think.

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What would you give for a retinal chip that let you see in the dark or for a next-generation cochlear implant that let you hear any conversation in a noisy restaurant, no matter how loud? Or for a memory chip, wired directly into your brain's hippocampus, that gave you perfect recall of everything you read? Or for an implanted interface with the Internet that automatically translated a clearly articulated silent thought ("the French sun king") into an online search that digested the relevant Wikipedia page and projected a summary directly into your brain?

Science fiction? Perhaps not for very much longer. Brain implants today are where laser eye surgery was several decades ago. They are not risk-free and make sense only for a narrowly defined set of patients—but they are a sign of things to come.

Unlike pacemakers, dental crowns or implantable insulin pumps, neuroprosthetics—devices that restore or supplement the mind's capacities with electronics inserted directly into the nervous system—change how we perceive the world and move through it. For better or worse, these devices become part of who we are.

Neuroprosthetics aren't new. They have been around commercially for three decades, in the form of the cochlear implants used in the ears (the outer reaches of the nervous system) of more than 300,000 hearing-impaired people around the world. Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first retinal implant, made by the company Second Sight.

Both technologies exploit the same principle: An external device, either a microphone or a video camera, captures sounds or images and processes them, using the results to drive a set of electrodes that stimulate either the auditory or the optic nerve, approximating the naturally occurring output from the ear or the eye.


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LaTisha Hockensmith's curator insight, March 16, 3:17 PM

Oh, my! What has this world come to?

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Between Ape and Artilect. Pioneers of Artificial Intelligence | #nano #AI #cyborgs #FreeBook

Between Ape and Artilect. Pioneers of Artificial Intelligence | #nano #AI #cyborgs #FreeBook | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.


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luiy's curator insight, March 8, 11:34 AM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

aanve's curator insight, March 8, 7:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 7:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

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Futurium - European Commission

Futurium - European Commission | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
One platform, Your voices, Our Futures
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The ethics of genetically enhanced monkey-slaves | TED Blog

The ethics of genetically enhanced monkey-slaves | TED Blog | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Professor of practical ethics, Julian Savulescu shares his thinking on the ethics of the biological enhancement of the human race.

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Yissar's curator insight, February 25, 10:46 AM

Article introduction: "Think parents should be able to select their children’s talents and personalities? Or want to run and hide in the woods at the thought of it? Whatever your opinion, it is precisely the kind of question that Julian Savulescu wants you to take seriously. Professor of practical ethics at the University of Oxford, Savulescu thinks deeply about the ethics of the biological enhancement of the human race. In his view, not only should you stop fearing such changes, you should consider them for yourself. In fact, he argues, you may even have an ethical responsibility to genetically modify your children."

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Book review: Speculative Everything. Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming - we make money not art

Book review: Speculative Everything. Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming - we make money not art | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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Can We Live Forever?

Can We Live Forever? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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tomorrows_world.jpg (JPEG Image, 976 × 2700 pixels)

tomorrows_world.jpg (JPEG Image, 976 × 2700 pixels) | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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Is the Internet Evolving Into a Global Brain?

Is the Internet Evolving Into a Global Brain? (Is the Internet Evolving Into a Global Brain?: http://t.co/6eUVRrpIAz)

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Valerie Jarrette Bass's curator insight, November 1, 2013 2:35 PM

The present Zeitgeist is Free Floating Anxiety...

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50 Posts About Cyborgs

50 Posts About Cyborgs | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
September 2010 was the 50th Anniversary of the coining of the term 'cyborg'. Over the course of the...
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