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Autopoiesis and how hyper-connectivity is literally bringing the networks to life | Trends in the Living Networks

Autopoiesis and how hyper-connectivity is literally bringing the networks to life | Trends in the Living Networks | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

he development of the infrastructure is the enabler—the global networks now have a nervous system. However the infrastructure itself is not the interesting part—it’s the signals and messages that travel through our shared nervous system that is the essence of our life. The brain of a human is quite similar to that of a dolphin or chimpanzee. And the brain of a genius is often indistinguishable from that of an idiot. Yes, we can now say that the global networks now have a shared nervous system in our communications infrastructure, however what will make this useful, what will create a true single superorganism, is the quality and richness of the information and ideas that flow through it. That is why the focus of this book is on the flow of information and ideas through the networks, how it is changing as the networks come alive, and the implications for business.

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The Long Poiesis
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End of Eating Food

End of Eating Food | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Eating food could be replaced by nanorobot nutrient delivery system.
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33rd Square | Cancer-Hunting Nanorobots Used to Seek and Destroy Tumors

33rd Square | Cancer-Hunting Nanorobots Used to Seek and Destroy Tumors | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
New research has opened up the possibility of an army of robots travelling around a human body, hunting down and destroying malignant tumors.
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This video clearly explains how robots have already taken over our world

If you think it's just a joke that robots are going to replace humans, it's not. It's going to happen. In fact, CGP Grey explains in 'Humans Need Not Apply' how it's already happening around us right now. You might not notice it but you will after you watch how we're following historical patterns towards obscurity.
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A Desirable-Future Haiku

The coming hundred years, in one hundred words
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The Next 20 Years Are Going To Make The Last 20 Look Like We Accomplished Nothing In Tech

The Next 20 Years Are Going To Make The Last 20 Look Like We Accomplished Nothing In Tech | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
"20 years from now we'll look back and say, 'Well, nothing really happened in the last 20 years,'" predicts founding Wired editor Kevin Kelly.
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MIT's cooking up robots that can assemble themselves in the oven

MIT's cooking up robots that can assemble themselves in the oven | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
It's 2050, and you're prepping the oven to bake your next robotic minion while a 3D printer spews out its components. Wait a sec... bake a robot? As
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Biotech's Brave New World: Push One To Create Life; Push Two To Create Alien Life

Biotech's Brave New World: Push One To Create Life; Push Two To Create Alien Life | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
It’s been a good month for miracles. And by miracles I mean our oldest miracle, that first miracle, the creation of life itself.

During these
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Karl Schroeder: The Singularity is an Old Idea. Keep Moving Forward!

Karl Schroeder: The Singularity is an Old Idea. Keep Moving Forward! | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Futurist and sci fi author Karl Schroeder argues that the singularity is only one among many ways of looking at the future and that we must develop other lenses and keep looking for new ideas and blind-spots.
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Nick Bostrom Explores Superintelligence in His New Book

Nick Bostrom Explores Superintelligence in His New Book | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
 Artificial Intelligence In Superintelligence, the new book from futurist thinker Nick Bostrom,  a variety of intellectual models are used to explore what will happen when machines exceed human...
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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 29, 6:31 PM

And, thus, the human species as we know it will fade out of existence, while a new one fades in.

 

Society will, I think, be more likely biased in favor of those who adapt the new technology, as opposed to those who don't, kind of like how drivers with corrected vision are more favored than those with impairments are not.

 

Hopefully, the notion of the universally rational human being is dead; destroyed in our mind's eye by a wave of psychological, sociological, economic and biological research, personal observation and experience.  Our biological brains are imperfect tools at best at sensing the whole of the universe.  Worse still, is that we don't know if there is a limit to the universe.  After all, there could be things that we cannot perceive or conceive with our current biological, sociological and cosmological make up.  How could we ever, with confidence, say that we've got EVERYTHING figured out definitively, even with these potential technological corrections?

 

Unfortunately, the worst offenders amongst us, those who perceive the universe less accurately than others, are likely to be the most stubborn amongst us at accepting and working with the new technological changes that could be coming down the pike.  These are the people who will be left behind and less favored by society and the natural universe, as those with the greater cognitive and potentially physical abilities get ahead faster and more often in our societies than those who don't.  These are the people who could, hypothetically, lash out against those who are adapting to the changes in knowledge that we get into the brain and robotics.  While they could win the war against the next generation of humanity, they are also likely to be more prone to self-destruction, thanks to the uncorrected "vision" as it were of their view of the universe and how things are and how things work.  They'll crash into that rock and die, while those who had corrected vision could have avoided it.

 

So, while I wouldn't want to be an early adapter of the new technology as it comes out, I also wouldn't want to be at the tail end of adapting it.  Those who have honestly contemplated themselves and the universe as a whole are more likely to acknowledge, be aware of and desire to fix their persistent mistakes and errors, while those who think they've got everything are more likely to not see their potential pitfalls and thus, not correct them appropriately, effectively or in time to save themselves.  I think that this should all be done by choice.  But I also think that things will progress to a point that you won't have a choice, if you're interested in being able to survive and succeed in our society.  New becomes old, new eclipses the old: cycle of life and the universe.

 

Quite frankly, I'd rather have my "vision" of how the world is corrected than leave it to chance alone.  I don't think I'm perfect as I am; my ego doesn't allow me to think like that.  Only then could we, I think, potentially begin to cope with the magnitude of the universe, what is and how it all works.

 

I hope that this technology comes to fruition at the appropriate time, if not for my own sake, then for our descendants' sake.

 

 

Jens Hoffmann's curator insight, May 6, 3:06 AM

In Superintelligence, the new book from futurist thinker Nick Bostrom,  a variety of intellectual models are used to explore what will happen when machines exceed human intelligence.

Read more: http://www.33rdsquare.com/2014/04/nick-bostrom-explores-superintelligence.html#ixzz30ut5gUPC 
Follow us: @33rdsquare on Twitter | 33rdsquare on Facebook

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Will superhuman powers give us superhuman problems?

Will superhuman powers give us superhuman problems? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
As different human enhancement technologies advance at different rates, they bleed into society gradually and without fanfare. What's more, they will increa...
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Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines

Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Our robot overlords are already here. We’re just anthropomorphizing our technology in more subtle ways than we’d imagined in the past.

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The Future of Being Human

The Future of Being Human | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
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A Revolution in Money

A Revolution in Money | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Futurists predict a revolution in the tenets of finance in the coming decades, similar to the changes that have been sweeping the information and telecommunications industries.
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The Next Black - A film about the Future of Clothing

'The Next Black' is a documentary film that explores the future of clothing. Watch as we meet with some of the most innovative companies on the planet to get...

 

 


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Alessio Erioli's curator insight, August 31, 5:06 PM

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Will Artificial Intelligence Doom The Human Race Within The Next 100 Years?

Will Artificial Intelligence Doom The Human Race Within The Next 100 Years? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
An Oxford philosophy professor who has studied existential threats ranging from nuclear war to superbugs says the biggest danger of all may be superintelligence.

Superintelligence is any intellect that outperforms human intellect in every field, a...
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IBM launches functioning brain-inspired chip | KurzweilAI

IBM launches functioning brain-inspired chip | KurzweilAI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
IBM neurosynaptic chip (credit: IBM) IBM announced today, August 7, the first computer chip to achieve one million programmable “neurons,” 256 million
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7 Finger Robot - YouTube

7 Finger Robot - YouTube | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Researchers at MIT have developed a robot that enhances the grasping motion of the human hand. (Learn more: http://bit.ly/1tdPd2t) The device, worn around on...
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We Will End Disability by Becoming Cyborgs - IEEE Spectrum

We Will End Disability by Becoming Cyborgs - IEEE Spectrum | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Neural interfaces and prosthetics will do away with biology’s failings
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Can the Nervous System Be Hacked?

Can the Nervous System Be Hacked? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Welcome to the brave new world of bioelectronics: implants that can communicate directly with the nervous system in order to try to fight everything from cancer to the common cold.

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Conceptually, bioelectronics is straightforward: Get the nervous system to tell the body to heal itself. But of course it’s not that simple. “What we’re trying to do here is completely novel,” says Pedro Irazoqui, a professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue University, where he’s investigating bioelectronic therapies for epilepsy. Jay Pasricha, a professor of medicine and neurosciences at Johns Hopkins University who studies how nerve signals affect obesity, diabetes and gastrointestinal-motility disorders, among other digestive diseases, says, “What we’re doing today is like the precursor to the Model T.”


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Life After New Media: Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska

Life After New Media: Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Interview with media theorists Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska by Janneke Adema and Ben Craggs. The interview focuses on Kember and Zylinska's recently published co-authored monograph Life After New Media: Mediation as a Vital Process. Topics of conversat...
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Vascular Networks Make Self-healing possible in Composites

Vascular Networks Make Self-healing possible in Composites | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

"One of the more intriguing capabilities in nature is, however, the number of biological systems that are able to self heal. Scientists, spurred on by the potential economic benefits of materials that would be able to repair themselves  - longer lifetime, lower maintenance costs and more efficiency - have worked to develop self-healing systems for various materials, including plastics. And with success: various polymers are now available which have  the intrinsic ability to repair damage caused by usage over time. Up until now, however, composites, were a whole different ballgame. But once again, nature showed the way."


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Watch as swarms of micro-robots run around making stuff

Watch as swarms of micro-robots run around making stuff | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Swarms or tiny micro-robots are being developed to build tiny assemblies.
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Scientists make first embryo clones from adults.

Scientists make first embryo clones from adults. | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Scientists for the first time have cloned cells from two adults to create early-stage embryos, and then derived tissue from those embryos that perfectly matched the DNA of the donors.

The experiment represents another advance in the quest to make tissue in the laboratory that could treat a range of maladies, from heart attacks to Alzheimer's. The study, involving a 35-year-old man and one age 75, was published Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

The creation of the first early-stage human clones, using infant and fetal cells rather than those from adults, was reported last year. The new experiment, with a few tweaks, confirms that striking and controversial breakthrough and also shows the technique works on mature cells.

"The proportion of diseases you can treat with [lab-made tissue] increases with age. So if you can't do this with adult cells, it is of limited value," said Robert Lanza, co-author of the study and chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology Inc. ACTC +1.43% of Marlborough, Mass. The study was funded in part by the government of Korea and done at a lab in California.

Such experiments are controversial because when cells are extracted from an early-stage human embryo, it destroys the embryo, which some people believe is equivalent to taking a life.

Scientists for the first time have cloned cells from two adults to create early-stage embryos, and then derived tissue from those embryos that perfectly matched the DNA of the donors.

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DARPA’s New Biotech Unit Will Try To Create New Life Forms | Alternative

DARPA’s New Biotech Unit Will Try To Create New Life Forms | Alternative | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Yes, sci-fi writers hard up for new material should spend an hour or so perusing the Defense Department’s 2015 budget proposal, especially the section covering the far-out research projects underway at DARPA, where the agency’s mad scientists are...
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Now You Can Build Google’s $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Enterprise | WIRED

Now You Can Build Google’s $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Enterprise | WIRED | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Andrew Ng wants to bring deep learning -- an emerging computer science field that seeks to mimic the human brain with hardware and software -- into the DIY era. ("Low-cost" neural nets on gpus.

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