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Edition #23 of The London Inquirer

Janurary Thirteenth, 1570

 

Authors:

 

Zachary Mangold

Danielle Kessler

Greg Krentsa

Madison Vettorino

Haley Vitti

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Sale at Flora's Boutique !

Sale at Flora's Boutique ! | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it

Come one come all, to Flora's Boutique! We have the lastest in fashion at the best prices!

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Comic of the week

Comic of the week | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it
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Globe Theatre Back Open For Business!

Globe Theatre Back Open For Business! | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it

By Madison Z. Vettorino 

 

     Only fourteen brief years after the rather costly construction of the often spoken about Globe Theatre, the Playhouse incinerated during a production of Henry VIII on the twenty-ninth of June 1613. The stage at which many of playwright William Shakespeare’s plays were once preformed was reduced to ashes. As of June thirtieth 1613, the only thing left of the Theatre were the memories play attendees made giggling at a comedy or sobbing at a heart-wrenching tragedy.

     At first, it might have seemed nearly impossible to replicate the original Playhouse. After all, the Theatre was truly a masterpiece, right down to the motto engraved in Latin (translating to “The whole world is a playhouse” in English) above the main entrance. However, the determined Shakespeare and his acting troupe have succeeded in producing a second Globe Theatre on the banks of the Thames River in Southwark—precisely where the original Theatre once stood. The fabrication of this second Playhouse has gotten much attention from the public.

     “I thoroughly appreciated the simply delightful production of Julius Caesar I saw in the original Globe Playhouse. My lady, Abigail, and I plan on seeing another play by Mr. Shakespeare at the new Globe Theatre,” says Mr. Arthur Smith, a play enthusiast.

     For just a penny, commoners can purchase a ticket to see one of Shakespeare’s critically-acclaimed productions at the new Globe Playhouse. If one wishes to see a tragedy, visit the Playhouse on a day that a black flag is posted. To view a comedy, go to the Globe when a white flag is put out. If a history is what you desire, the Globe Theatre has just that on days when the Playhouse boasts a red flag.

     No matter what genre of play you prefer, no matter who you are, the new Globe Theatre has something for everyone. Now that it is open for all who wish to enjoy a variety of productions, do not shy away. See one play at the new Globe Theatre or see them all!

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From last week's edition

From last week's edition | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it
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No One Hail the Queen's Fashion!

No One Hail the Queen's Fashion! | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it

    By Danielle Kessler

 

     Queen Elizabeth left herself abashed after being discerned on multiple occasions breaking the most basic fashion rules. The Queen was spotted at Greenwich last week wearing a gown of black satin. Not only is that the color of a peasant’s gown, but it was painfully apparent that a pearl and a gold tassel were missing from what was already a disastrous ensemble. It seems Queen Elizabeth had exceeded her budget on the lavish jewels of her gown and was unable to pay a seamstress to sew them on properly.

     The poor quality of the Queen’s attire was also highlighted at copious amount of other events. Within the last month, there has been four other instances, besides the one previously stated, where precious stones escaped from Queen Elizabeth’s garments. It was reported that multiple large gold enameled blue pendants were absent from a purple velvet kirtle. A gold acorn and an oak leaf were lost at Westminister only yesterday. Queen Elizabeth has convinced her gullible self that all of these valuable gems were stolen at the events she wore them at, but that is near impossible when she is encompassed by her royal family. One of the rubies on her hat band, which was supposedly set in gold, may have decided that gold was not its home. It jumped right off of the Queen’s hatband and into a plush wine red carpet to never be found by the bus loads of people that Queen Elizabeth had searching for it.

     Although the Queen seems to be attempting to set trends of her own such as dressing like a peasant and sporting cheaply made clothing, she did emulate the French’s version of the farthingale. Now the width of a woman’s body is four times what it actually is. Queen Elizabeth’s only problem is fitting through the door, but other women who followed this apparent “fashion advance” may also run into problems walking around their house, as not everyone lives in the exquisite Whitehall palace.

 

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Criminals among us!

Criminals among us! | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it

By Greg Krentsa

 

Stewart Mc' muffins pulled from his house after being seen performing "black magic". His wife, Linda, pleaded for the release of her husband, but it she was dismissed from the hearing. After searching his house, they found "ingredients" of black magic potions. Stewart will be drowned in a pond to prove his innocence, if by chance he survives, he will forever be declared a witch and hung in public, disgracing his family's name.
On the corner of Thames street, William Schneider was walking around drunk! Local authorities caught him and made him pay a fine, he will serve 5 days in the racks, publicly embarrassed.
This was a exciting week! Filled with murder and horse theft! Robert Kendal was brutally beaten down by Fred Millie at the Tavern after a bar fight. Fred will have a chance to prove his innocence, but a crime like that is punishable by death! Three horses were stolen from a local farm! The theif escaped westward and was never found. Authorities are on his trail and will likely catch him soon.

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Playing the Prize

Playing the Prize | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it

By Zachary Mangold

 

     The procession of drums and flags started up once again today, as The Company of Masters held another skills test this afternoon.
     Henry Clark, a four year student of the guild, successfully completed his moving up ceremony yesterday afternoon. After walking off the stage to coins and cheer, Henry went back to training school and took the school oath.
      Clark is the Company of Masters' newest free scholar, having advanced from a scholar to the aforementioned grade. Clark said he was "...honored to be accepted," and that he would "Uphold the guild's gold standard."
     It has been 30 years since king Henry VIII granted a charter to the Company of Masters so that they could train men in the arts of defense. The ceremony had extra grandeur today to celebrate that! The crowd today was larger than ever, and you could feel the excitement during his bouts! After completing his last bout, the crowd roared with cheer at the Company of Masters' first graduate of the year.

   

 

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The Prodigy Playwriter

The Prodigy Playwriter | The London Inquirer | Scoop.it

By Haley Vitti

 

      The distinguished play writer of all time, William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564), brings to us another great play, Julius Caesar. The third of eight children, three of which died in infancy, wrote and directed some of the most remarked composers of his time. He was unwillingly married to his three months pregnant, bride-to-be, Anne Hathaway before pursuing his dreams of writing plays. They had three beautiful children, Susanna (May 28, 1583), and the two twins, Judith and Hamnet (1585). But what started his outrageous fame?

     His first huge play, A Midsummer's Night Dream, became one of the most well known, thought-provoking plays in the Elizabethan era. Such lines like, "The course of true love never did run smooth." The play attracted hundreds. His reign of the top play writer continued when he wrote plays such as Romeo and Juliet and The Merchant of Venice. Vivid scripting and extravagant plot twists are one of the many reasons why Shakespeare is one of the most eminent play writers.

     His experience and success as a popular director help spread the word on his upcoming play, Julius Caesar. The new construction of the Globe Theatre with the combination of one of London's most well known directors leads one to imagine a spectacular show will be put on. His works have outdone any other play writer. Don't miss the performance Friday and Saturday from 6:00-8:30 pm.

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