The Journalist
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Journalism today and tomorrow
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Old testament vs. new testament journalism

The free press gods initially gave us the old testament. Then the news testament rose and took over for about 90 years. Recently the old testament has roared back to life and now we have something close to parity or détente, in which it is recognized that we need both.

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bleisaetze's comment, November 6, 2013 7:10 AM
Interesting metaphor, even allegory....
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BBC now more cautious about UGC

BBC now more cautious about UGC | The Journalist | Scoop.it

The BBC has started issuing on-air cautions for user-generated material. The change comes after concerns were raised  in a 2012 BBC Trust reportover the use of amateur footage during the corporation's coverage of the Arab Spring.

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Renewing the youth audience for news

Renewing the youth audience for news | The Journalist | Scoop.it

Robert Freeman is a social media specialist with the BBC College of Journalism. Robert was Head of Multimedia at The Press Association and Head of Video at The Guardian, as well as a member of BBC News Online's original launch team.

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News brands in the spotlights

News brands in the spotlights | The Journalist | Scoop.it

For most of a decade, news companies have been operating on thinning ice. This week, events on both seaboards of the Atlantic displayed anew just how thin the foundations on which many major news operations operate are. With each crack comes a new sense of mortality and, thankfully, motivation.

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BBC Scandal Blows Up

BBC Scandal Blows Up | The Journalist | Scoop.it

The director-general of the BBC resigned amid a flurry of allegations around sex-abuse reporting. Peter Jukes on the growing fiasco—and how it could affect The New York Times.

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Who are the most social publishers online?

Who are the most social publishers online? | The Journalist | Scoop.it

BuzzFeed has been named the "most social" publisher on Facebook in aranking of August's most shared online content, with the BBC boasting the best performance on Twitter. The BBC had more than 2m tweets for the 8,016 articles it produced in August - putting them far ahead of Mashable, the New York Times, The Guardian, CNN and even BuzzFeed.

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Ten questions for Richard Sambrook

Ten questions for Richard Sambrook | The Journalist | Scoop.it

Richard Sambrook is Professor and Director of the Centre for Journalism at Cardiff University - the UK's oldest journalism school. He was Vice President of the EBU from 2006 to 2009.

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The ups, downs and ups of BBC News online

The ups, downs and ups of BBC News online | The Journalist | Scoop.it
It's 15 years since the BBC News website launched. At the time, in 1997, there were fewer than eight million people online in the UK.
radiomike's insight:

Clickable chart traces the progress of BBC News Online since its launch in 1997. It shows both the rise in audience and the major stories along the way.

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The BBC shows how to cover a crisis

By radiomike

 

There is a strange kind of circularity to life. When I joined the EBU, nearly nine years ago, the BBC was in the midst of an editorial crisis that was every bit as serious as the controversy currently engulfing the corporation.

 

Then, a report on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme had accused the government of “sexing up” dossiers about Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction. The report set in train a series of events that may have led to the suicide of a prominent scientist, and certainly brought about the resignation of the BBC's chairman Gavyn Davies and director-general Greg Dyke.

 

Nearly nine years later, some commentators believe that the current director-general, George Entwistle, was forced to resign after appearing on Radio 4's Today programme. He was subjected to a 15-minute grilling about a TV report that had led to a former Conservative party treasurer being wrongly accused of child abuse.

 

The typically robust interview focused, amongst other things, on the BBC’s editorial chain of command. Mr Entwhistle was asked about the corporation’s failure to prevent the allegations from being broadcast on Newsnight, BBC TV’s flagship news and current affairs programme.

 

The perceived breakdown in the BBC's editorial process was compounded by another, on-going controversy. When the latest allegations were aired, the BBC was already reeling under the fallout from a controversial decision to shelve an earlier Newsnight investigation, into abuse by the late presenter, Jimmy Savile.

 

Just eight years after the implementation of sweeping reforms to strengthen and future-proof BBC journalism, on the recommendation of a former head of news and current affairs, Ron Neil, the BBC is now facing renewed questions about its general editorial process. Some of them may be pertinent only to the BBC, but here are three of the wider issues, which are relevant to all public service news media:

 

>>The broadcast culture
Do we spend enough time verifying facts before rushing to beat the efforts of rival news organisations? Are we too preoccupied with the drama of reporting?

 

>>Social media
Do we really understand the power of social media to scrutinize, follow-up and broaden journalistic reports with little regard to ethics or other editorial niceties? Although never named during the report, the Conservative politician was identified on Twitter.

 

>>Is public service journalism too ambitious?
In the UK, the BBC’s critics will suggest that public service news should be confined to reporting known facts that have already been uncovered elsewhere.

 

This last point, on whether public service journalism should aspire to break new stories and to explore new areas of original journalism, is critical. After all, one of the public service values championed by the EBU and our members is innovation.

 

Ambition and originality define and justify public service journalism as much as the traditional values of fairness, accuracy, independence and impartiality. These qualities have made the BBC one of the most revered news organisation in the world.

 

Under the firm stewardship of Tim Davie, who will lead the corporation until the appointment of a new director-general, hopes are high that the BBC will recover quickly. In the meantime, other news organizations, who often look to the BBC for guidance and leadership, will be inspired by the fair and rigorous way that BBC journalists are covering their own crisis.

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