The Jam Band Buisness Model
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The Business of Phish

The Business of Phish | The Jam Band Buisness Model | Scoop.it
Over the past four years, the rock band Phish has generated over $120 million in ticket sales, handily surpassing more well known artists like Radiohead, The Black Keys, and One Direction. Since their...
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This article explains how the band Phish (one of the most well known jam band), with minimum to no media exposure, became successful and profitable. With relentless touring, and a slowly but growing fan base, the direct relationship between artist and fans helped create an almost obsessive fan loyalty. The improvisational approach and the randomness of the shows offered a unique experience per performance to the fan, giving the fans the possibility to experience multiple shows, one after the other, without getting tired of it. This led to the band getting booked and filling stadiums constantly, thus making touring and ticket selling their main source of income (to the point were CD sells did not matter much)

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Improvisation and Reciprocity: An Analysis of the Jam Band Community and Its Unique Business Model

Improvisation and Reciprocity: An Analysis of the Jam Band Community and Its Unique Business ModelClick here to edit the title

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This article explains how today's jam band business model runs. It explains how traditional music business is even detrimental to the success of a jam band, and the fans don't appreciate the main stream media. In fact, it is common practice to shorten the link between artist and fan as much as possible, by using either internet or creating their own labels to be able to mold the bands business model into what their fans would appreciate the most. This enables a sense of cooperation, were the bands and their fans join forces to create what's best and fair for both the fans and the band alike.

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'Jammy' Awards for Underground Musicians Gain Prominence

'Jammy' Awards for Underground Musicians Gain Prominence | The Jam Band Buisness Model | Scoop.it
For years, there have been countless bands tirelessly playing in front of ever-growing crowds. These so-called jambands, known for their propensity to improvise, continue to thrive under the radar of mainstream music.
Regularly overlooked by radio stations and major record labels, these...
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This article explains how a really important event in the jam band scene (the Jammy Awards) takes place in Madison Square Garden, without massive media exposure. it also explains how the jam band scene views recording tapes as free publicity, rather than loss revenue as the regular music industry would see it, and this is possible for one reason: their product is live music.

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Frank Zappa Interview (MTV, 1984) - YouTube

December 8, 1984 FZ talks about his influences, MTV & music videos, progressive rock, John & Yoko, guitar players. A fragment appears on "Rock Influences" (M...
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Towards the end of this interview, Frank Zappa explains how the reason his show is unique, and thus appeal-able to his audience, is true improvisation. He explains how taking the chance of making a possible mistake in a guitar solo (as well as making crowd unique jokes) makes each show a unique experience. He claims that the uniqueness is what kept people coming for over 20 years back to his concerts. He portrays how making a unique live experience makes an audience and fans come back over and over again.

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Marketing Lessons from the Grateful Dead mini-documentary

David Meerman Scott and Brian Halligan launched their book "Marketing Lessons from the Grateful Dead" on tour the week of the Gathering of the Vibes festival 7/29-8/1,…
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In this mini-documentary they explain how the business model that the Grateful Dead (the first jam band) created became successful. Since this business model puts first and foremost the fans, the band creates a unique experience to their audience every concert; even letting them record and share the shows for free (making it free publicity). Since the experience is not repeatable, people sharing the tapes wouldn't affect their business at all, since the product is not that show in particular, but every show in itself. It is not only the music, but the musicians and even the unique crowd that each concert brings (compared in this video to a travelling circus), that make each concert a complete different experience.

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