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The Next Wave: 4D Printing

The Next Wave: 4D Printing | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Programming the Material World 3D printing (additive manufacturing) has been around for nearly three decades, but only in the last few years has it captured the imagination of millions of people with its potential to manufacture almost any object,...
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Sabine VanderLinden's curator insight, July 12, 4:27 AM

From 3D to 4D printing...

The Innovation Economy
Articles on innovation and entrepreneurship
Curated by John Muller
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The manager and the moron | McKinsey & Company

The manager and the moron | McKinsey & Company | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
The computer is a moron. And the stupider the tool, the brighter the master must be, says Peter Drucker. In this Quarterly archive article, he explains how “the dumbest tool we have ever had” will compel managers to think through their actions. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
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An inside look at how Rocket Internet builds startups at scale

An inside look at how Rocket Internet builds startups at scale | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Rocket Internet is known for launching and growing tech companies at an astonishing rate and speed, but here are some inside accounts about how it's done.
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Annual Planning is Killing Your Growth – Try This Plan Instead

Annual Planning is Killing Your Growth – Try This Plan Instead | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
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Bill Barnett on Strategy: Why You Don't Understand "Disruption"

Bill Barnett on Strategy: Why You Don't Understand "Disruption" | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
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The Innovation Revolution - Project Syndicate

The Innovation Revolution - Project Syndicate | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Project Syndicate: Economics, finance, politics, and global affairs from the world's opinion page
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Can Lending Technology Revive America’s Small Businesses?

Can Lending Technology Revive America’s Small Businesses? | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Lack of credit is holding back the recovery on Main Street.
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Invisible Corporations, Part Two

Personal website of Aaron N. Tubbs
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Are We Approaching Peak App Overload? A Q&A With Greylock's John Lilly About App Splits.

Are We Approaching Peak App Overload? A Q&A With Greylock's John Lilly About App Splits. | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Some app splits make sense. Others, not so much.
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Joel Mokyr: What Today's Economic Gloomsayers Are Missing

Joel Mokyr: What Today's Economic Gloomsayers Are Missing | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Joel Mokyr writes that science is enabling invention like never before and in ways that will improve life but isn't captured by GDP statistics.
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Disruption theory's ultimate ironic success would be falsifying itself. Plus Newton, Popper and Darwin duke it out.

Disruption theory's ultimate ironic success would be falsifying itself. Plus Newton, Popper and Darwin duke it out. | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
One angle of attack on Clayton Christensen's disruption theory is that it's often stretched beyond it's range of applicability, to the point of becoming unfalsifiable. For example, Benedict Evans t...
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Wall street, businesses and even developers feel the seductive allure of monopoly without consequences.

Wall street, businesses and even developers feel the seductive allure of monopoly without consequences. | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Everyone loves a sure thing. And for Wall Street a sure thing is a monopoly. I've written about this before, e.g., The stock market blindly lusts after exploitative monopolies. But the siren call o...
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The Emerging Landscape Of API Orchestration Platforms

The Emerging Landscape Of API Orchestration Platforms | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
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Dancing with Robots: Human Skills for Computerized Work

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What Is Big Data? - datascience@berkeley

What Is Big Data? - datascience@berkeley | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
What is Big Data? To settle the question once and for all, we asked 40+ thought leaders in publishing, fashion, food, automobiles, medicine, marketing and every industry in between how exactly they would define the phrase “Big Data.” Their answers might surprise you!
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iPhone 6 and Android value

iPhone 6 and Android value | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
The new iPhones were much the most predictable part of Apple's event -
widely leaked and impelled by an irresistible logic - the customer is
always right. For all that Apple thought and argued that you should
optimize for the thumb size, it turns out optimizing for the pocket size is
a better metric. *

(Of course, this isn't the first time - Steve Jobs famously said that
no-one would watch video on an iPod, and that small tablets should come
with sandpaper for your fingers).

Meanwhile, Apple did not, as I and others have argued it now could, make
any real change to its pricing strategy. We still have a new model at $600
or so (plus another that's even more expensive) and older models at $100
and $200 cheaper, together with a (very) large secondary market act to
address some of the top of the mid-range, but no more. 

Instead, these phones are a direct move against premium Android. 

Apple currently has about 10% of global handset unit sales, at an ASP of
$550-600, and Android has another 50% at an ASP of $250-300 (almost all the
rest are feature phones, now also converting fast to Android at well under
$100). But within that Android there is a lucrative segment of high-end
phones that sells at roughly the same price and in roughly the same numbers
as the iPhone. To put this another way, Apple has 10% of the handset market
but half of the high-end, and Android has the other half of the high end. 

That Android high-end is dominated by Samsung, and by screens with larger
screens than previous iPhones. Until now.

How much of an impact will these new iPhones have on that segment? There
are a bunch of reasons why someone would buy a high-end Android rather than
an iPhone:

1. Their operator subsidies an Android but not an iPhone - this has now
ended, with Apple adding distribution with all the last significant
hold-outs (Sprint, DoCoMo, China Mobile)
2. They don't particularly care what phone they get and the salesman was
on more commission to sell Androids or, more probably, Samsungs that
day (and iPhones the next, of course)
3. They have a dislike of Apple per se - this is hard to quantify but
probably pretty small, and balanced by people with a dislike of
Google
4. They are heavily bought into the Google ecosystem
5. They like the customizations that are possible with Android and that
have not been possible with iOS until (to a much increased extent)
iOS8 (more broadly, once could characterize this as 'personal taste')
6. They want a larger screen. 

Splitting these out, the first has largely gone, the second is of little
value to an ecosystem player and nets out at zero (i.e. Apple gains as many
indifferent users as it loses) and the third is small. Apple has now
addressed the fifth and sixth, and the massive increase in third-party
attach points means that Google's ecosystem (and Facebook's incidentally)
can now push deep into iOS - if Google chooses to do so. 

That is, with the iPhone 6 and iOS8, Apple has done its best to close off
all the reasons to buy high-end Android beyond simple personal preference.
You can get a bigger screen, you can change the keyboard, you can put
widgets on the notification panel (if you insist) and so on. Pretty much
all the external reasons to choose Android are addressed - what remains is
personal taste.

Amongst other things, this is a major cull of Steve Jobs' sacred cows -
lots of these are decisions he was deeply involved in. No-one was quicker
than Steve Jobs himself to change his mind, but it's refreshing to see so
many outdated assumptions being thrown out. 

Meanwhile, with the iPhone 6 Plus (a very Microsofty name, it must be said)
Apple is also tackling the phablet market head on. The available data
suggests this is mostly important in East Asia but not actually dominant
even there - perhaps 10-20% of units except in South Korea, where it is
much larger.  Samsung has tried hard to make the pen (or rather stylus) a
key selling point for these devices, but without widespread developer
support (there is nothing as magical as Paper for the Note) it is not clear
that these devices have actually sold on anything beyond screen size and
inverse price sensitivity (that is, people buy it because it's the 'best'
and most expensive one). That in turn means the 6 Plus could be a straight
substitute. 

Finally, not unlike Nokia for much of its history, Apple remains the only
handset maker of scale making phones with a premium hardware design. Both
Nokia and HTC also made equally desirable hardware but for different
reasons have faded from the scene, while Samsung appears unable to make the
shift in approach that this would necessitate. Several Chinese OEMs are
making significant progress here (most obviously Xiaomi), but are not yet
in a position to challenge Apple directly, and indeed are much more of a
problem for Samsung, which finds itself squeezed in the middle. 

Setting aside the OEM horse-race commentary, the important thing about this
move is how much it tends to reinforce the dominant dynamic of the two
ecosystems - that Apple has a quarter of the users but three quarters of
the value.  

We know from data given at WWDC and Google IO that Apple paid out ~$10bn to
iOS developers in the previous 12 months and Google paid out ~$5bn. Yet,
Google reported "1bn" Android users (outside China). Apple, depending on
your assumptions about replacement rates, has between 550m and 650m active
devices (though fewer total human users). That is, Apple brought in twice
the app revenue on a little over half the users. (I wrote a detailed
analysis of this here.)

We used to say that of course the average spend for Android users was
lower, because the devices were available at any price for $80 to $800
where iPhones average $600, and sold well in poorer countries, but the
premium Android users were bound to be worth much the same as iPhone users.
This new data showed that this was not true. 

If premium Android users were worth the same as iPhone users, but the
mid-range and low-end Android users were (naturally) worth less, then the
Android number should have been (say) $11bn versus Apple's $10bn. But it's
$5bn. So, even the premium Android users, the very best ones - even the
people buying phablets - are worth much less to the ecosystem than an
iPhone user. And now Apple is now going after them too. 

This takes us to a final question - is it the users or is it the ecosystem?
If Apple converts a big chunk of premium Android users to the iPhone 6 when
they come to refresh their phones (and note that since they won't all have
bought their phones in September 2012, they won't all be up for upgrade as
soon as the new iPhones come out), will their behavior change? Are we
seeing less ecosystem value for these users because of differences in the
platform they're on, or is there something different about those users'
attitudes?

And, of course, if those users do leave, what will the Android metrics look
like then?

* Just as for multitasking, and the new extensions in iOS8, Apple had to
work hard to make this possible - in this case it had to move away from
pixel-perfect layouts to something more responsive. This of course is where
Android started - since it was predicated on a wide range of devices it had
to allow for different layouts, where Apple started from one screen size.
This, I think, reflects a broader trend - that Android and iPhone started
in quite different places and have converged over the past 5 years.
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When creative destruction becomes creative devastation | FT Alphaville

John Komlos of the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich proposes in a new paper that 'creative destruction' has become devastating, not just destructive:
the destructive power associated with Schumpeterian creative destruction has increased markedly relative to their creative component, in contrast to previous epochs. Creative destruction’s gentle winds have mutated into cyclones of destruction.
Thus, our sense of well-being will probably not keep pace with even the slow economic growth being predicted by Gordon, Summers, and Krugman. While the economy will be growing, albeit slowly, we predict that our sense of well-being will be mysteriously lagging well behind.
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Why Silicon Valley Will Continue to Rule the Tech Economy

Why Silicon Valley Will Continue to Rule the Tech Economy | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Michael S. Malone says that human talent and research and design labs are arriving to dominate the new era of devices.
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Do Software Engineers Get Enough Respect? | TechCrunch

Do Software Engineers Get Enough Respect? | TechCrunch | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
"For software engineers, life must seem like it keeps getting better," cheerleads CNet. Glassdoor agrees: our median salary is now $85K, and six figures in..
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Is an ad-based business model the original sin of the web -- and if so, what do we do about it?

Is an ad-based business model the original sin of the web -- and if so, what do we do about it? | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Ethan Zuckerman of MIT, who helped develop the first online pop-up ad, argues that an ad-based model is responsible for the privacy-invading nature of the modern web — but even if that’s true, how do we fix it?
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Start me up

Start me up | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames. EVEN Luddites know that the largest internet firms reside in America. The...
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Sabine VanderLinden's curator insight, August 14, 5:10 AM

Interesting facts on global start-ups

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Walter Isaacson: “Innovation” doesn’t mean anything anymore

Walter Isaacson: “Innovation” doesn’t mean anything anymore | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
The man who brought America inside the minds of Einstein, Franklin and Jobs takes issue with modern-day tech hype
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My letter to Hachette's CEO

My letter to Hachette's CEO | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Amazon asked authors and readers to write to Hachette's CEO regarding this debate. Here is mine: Dear Mr Pietsch        I am writing to you at the request of Amazon but, in fact, it is to plea with...
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Scientists who corral big data projects become high-tech stars

Scientists who corral big data projects become high-tech stars | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
New career track pays up to $300,000 for those able to analyze mounds and write algorithms that can put the insights to work in industries as varied as retailing, finance and match-making.
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Taking A Wait-And-See Approach With Disruptive Innovations | TechCrunch

Taking A Wait-And-See Approach With Disruptive Innovations | TechCrunch | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
There’s been quite the brouhaha lately about disruptive innovation. On one side is Harvard Prof. Clay Christensen (author of The Innovator’s Dilemma) and..
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The Most Fascinating Profile You’ll Ever Read About a Guy and His Boring Startup | Business | WIRED

The Most Fascinating Profile You’ll Ever Read About a Guy and His Boring Startup | Business | WIRED | The Innovation Economy | Scoop.it
Ariel Zambelich/WIRED Stewart is hungry. He’s munching on potatoes smothered in chicken fat drippings, sitting by a long metal table that once served as a gurney in the morgue at the Treasure Island Naval Base. It’s a prominent piece of furniture in what will be the kitchen area for Stewart’s new startup. All told, the…
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