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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from Information Science and LIS
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Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers | LawyerKM

Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers | LawyerKM | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
I am constantly reminded of the importance of communicating effectively.  And I am repeatedly convinced that a simple message delivered in a simple way is most ("Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers" by @LawyerKM

 

Connections  Are the Key…

My favorite (and primary) way to communicate KM to lawyers — and the representation in the KM card, above — is to speak in terms of connections.  It’s about “connecting people with people, connecting people with knowledge and information, and the processes, procedures, and technologies required to make those connections.”  I like this approach because it is broad, yet meaningful.  It allows me to talk about various aspects of KM from culture to technology, without eyes glazing over.

I carry the KM cards with me at work (and elsewhere).  When I need to explain KM to someone, I talk about connections.  After my elevator speech, I hand them a card as a take-away mnemonic.   “Here’s an easy way to remember what we do,” I say,  “the KM department’s email address is on the back.”

The more “complex” definitions of KM are fine when talking to people in KM circles and getting into the depths of knowledge management, but when talking to busy lawyers, spouting some convoluted, jargon-bloated, “nonsense” is the surest way to lose their attention.  Lawyers are no strangers to jargon.  They know it — and will reject it (and you) — the second they hear it.


Via Karen du Toit, Brad Abbott, Joao Brogueira
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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 30, 2013 6:14 AM

Knowledge Management for lawyers > useful in all fields/organizations!

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From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge

From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China. (...) - by Adrian Giordani, MyScienceWork blog, 27 november 2012


Via Julien Hering, PhD, Pavlinka Kovatcheva, Karen du Toit
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Karen du Toit's curator insight, November 29, 2012 7:15 AM

"Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China.

This article was originally published in International Science Grid This Week as “Enabling knowledge creation in data-driven science”
http://www.isgtw.org/feature/enabling-knowledge-creation-data-driven-science

[...]

 

"To answer this problem [of data deluge], some are creating infrastructures and software that are set to radically transform the way scientific publishing is done, which has been little changed for centuries.

Research publishing 2.0

While a number of scientific institutes, European Commission-funded projects, and research communities work on establishing common data policies and open-access infrastructures to make research data more searchable, shareable, and citable, the life sciences are looking at data analysis and publishing approaches that move the computer to the data rather than moving the data to the computers"

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The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator

The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
How could it REALLY change libraries?“@libraryfuture: The iPad Mini’s meaning & impact on libraries http://t.co/sh54FFJN”...

 

"For Libraries:
With this smaller device, the reach of the Apple iOS and resources through it expands to more of our patrons (those preferring the smaller device size and smoother integration into their lives) and into more of their spaces. So be prepared for more iOS mobile engagement with your content and services.

For librarians’ use: the Mini may be better suited for mobile library staff: easier use with Square and mobile payments, more portable for roving reference, for checking out tablets to users."


Via Karen du Toit
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The Economics of Long-Term Digital Storage

Economics of digital preservation. Or, paper vs bits. It's on!

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The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed

The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Submitted by Patricia J Delois:

RT @sallyheroes: "It appears that the number one thing patrons use the library for is (prepare yourself) books": http://t.co/CEiQTtdC via @JustinLibrarian...

 

"[...] surprised they would select books when they have so many other things to choose from. I imagine he’s even more surprised to learn that something else patrons rate highly is personal interaction with the staff. I don’t know who designed the survey, but it couldn’t have been the director. It wouldn’t have occurred to him to put “human interaction” on the list of things patrons might value. He’s all about technology.

No one disputes that technology has improved the library experience for the patron. You can search the catalog from home and access our subscribed databases. You can place your own holds, request your own interlibrary loan materials, download books to your own devices.

The library is working towards self-checkout, presumably so you can conduct all your library business without ever having to interact with the staff. This must sound like a dream-come-true for the director, who hates to interact with the library staff, but for patrons, there’s more to the library than just the delivery of materials. They like human contact."


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Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms

Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Carl Grant:

"At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, I gave the keynote talk at the NISO Update Session. My goal was to give attendees some thoughts about how important it is that they participate actively in the shaping of the new cloud-computing platforms which are are emerging from a number of organizations, including OCLC, Ex Libris, Serials Solution, Innovative and Kuali. I stated that the main reason for our participation as librarians is simply this: So we can ensure the value of librarianship is contained within and amplified by these new technological foundations.

 

There were three key points I talked about us doing in order to accomplish this. They were:

1. The mission and value of librarianship have to be embedded in the software you’re using.

2. Defining our future is a task of participation, NOT representation.

3. For our services to have value they must offer differentiation."


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New Introducing the Library Marketing Toolkit website! – Stephen's Lighthouse

New Introducing the Library Marketing Toolkit website! – Stephen's Lighthouse | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

The Library Marketing Toolkit website, by Ned Potter! [@theREALwikiman]

 

"The site is essentially designed to give you lots of practical advice on how to market your library – be that public, academic, special or archive. There are tools and resources, lots of useful links, new case studies which will be added to on an ongoing basis, and there’s info about the Library Marketing Toolkit book and its contributors.

There’s also a blog, which will give tips and aim to highlight the best (and sometimes the worst) marketing from libraries around the world. The first post is Marketing libraries with new technologies: what you need to know, and what to do next and features this presentation, which I gave yesterday at an Academic and Research Libraries Group conference on new technologies in libraries”

 

Blog post: Marketing libraries... http://www.librarymarketingtoolkit.com/2012/05/marketing-libraries-with-new.html

 


Via Guus van den Brekel, Karen du Toit
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How Technology Changes Our Relationships

How Technology Changes Our Relationships | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
Ah, the Internet.The once magnificent and glorious tool has transformed from being a fast-paced information highway to that place where we all admit, rather begrudgingly, that we spend too much time on.

...

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Predictions for 2013

Predictions for 2013 | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"Technology changes open opportunities for global business and social change."

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8 Tips for the Care & Feeding of the Reluctant Tech User, by @gwynethjones at The Daring Librarian

8 Tips for the Care & Feeding of the Reluctant Tech User, by @gwynethjones at The Daring Librarian | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"Teaching tech in isolation never works. When a reluctant tech user learns how to do something with a project about which they're personally passionate, they're gonna be instantly engaged, work hard at it, and feel super exultant when it works!"

 

1. Make it personal

2. Show and tell

3. Small steps, etc"


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Fostering Female Technology Leadership in Libraries - The Digital Shift

Fostering Female Technology Leadership in Libraries - The Digital Shift | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
This.On the gender gap in tech workers, by @rtennant http://t.co/rQ0310ST...

 

"[...]we can change things:


1. Work to change the culture. In many library tech situations, whether it is a chatroom or a server room, it’s still a men’s locker room atmosphere. 
2. Support and encourage women who try. 
3. Recruit and support women who are interested. 
4. If you are well along in your career, mentor promising women. 
5. Be verbose and inclusive with explanations, and spare with posturing."


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DSHR's Blog: Re-thinking Storage Technology Replacement Policy

DSHR's Blog: Re-thinking Storage Technology Replacement Policy | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

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The NDSA Web Archiving Survey « The Signal: Digital Preservation

The NDSA Web Archiving Survey « The Signal: Digital Preservation | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

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Delivering the Wellcome Digital Library

Delivering the Wellcome Digital Library...

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10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities

10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Staff Writers:

"In honor of School Library Month, check out the ways libraries are going to blossom in the coming years."

 

"[...] the almost uncanny ability to consistently adapt to the changing demands of the local populace and emerging technology alike. The library system probably won’t disappear anytime soon, but rather, see itself blossoming into something new and exciting in congruence with today’s myriad informational demands."

 

1. More technology

2. Sensory story times

3. Better outreach to ESOL and ESL adults & children

4. Automation

5. Emphasizing community space

6. More social media savvy

7. Digital media labs

8. Electronic outposts

9. Crowdsourcing

10. More active librarians


Via Karen du Toit
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