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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from The Information Professional
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Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012 by Colleen Egget

We are talking about reference and how it is changing in UPLIFT this week: August 15 at the Utah State Library & August 17 2012 in Ephraim, at the Karen A. Hunstman Library on the Snow College campus.

 

Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012:

 

- Traditional reference work is less relevant to the needs of users
- Rather than worrying about reference’s demise, many librarians have been energized by their newly expanded roles
- Reconfigured or eliminated reference desks
- Consolidated desks and services
- Librarian and support staff work together on the one main desk
- Librarian can handle more complicated questions
- Increased training for support staff to handle basic reference questions
- The reference interview is as pertinent as ever
- Roving reference is more important—getting out to where people are
- Expansion of self-service options (self-checkout, online group study room reservations, self-service holds, and touch screen frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) on your website/ library catalog
- Reconfiguring online reference resources for smartphones and other mobile devices
- Librarians are exploring new roles in reaching out to meet information needs
- Reference through the stacks and other indirect means
- Reduction/elimination of print reference collections
- Greater marketing and promotion of online resources and services
- Librarians will spend less time staffing desks and more time outside of library walls
- Online reference: email, chat, Instant Messaging, and SMS (short messaging services) reaches users who may not visit the library
- Online reference requires continual marketing to be successful
- Collaborating with other organizations will do as much to keep libraries alive as any project or program
- Embedded librarianship: becoming an integral part. Getting close to users by getting out into the community; being actively present with the user at the point of need.
- The big shift: we’re not doing things “for” the community, but we’re being a part “of” the community
- Libraries are shifting from the physical to the virtual facilities and media; from an individual to a community focus; from being a collection library to being a creation library; from being an archive to being a portal


Via Karen du Toit
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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from The Information Professional
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The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management « Legal Current

The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management « Legal Current | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management http://t.co/lXh0JS6t...

 

Gretchen DeSutter: 

"As firms strive for greater efficiency and delivering greater value to clients, knowledge management system can help firms by streamlining search.

Because of their skill set and experience, librarians are uniquely positioned to help firms get the most out of their knowledge management systems. According to the 2011 ALM Law Librarian "Survey, 57 percent are playing a more active role in KM than three years ago."

In the end, it’s all about placing the right information into the user’s hands at the right time and in the right format. Librarians know how to do that better than anyone, and those skills can make the difference in helping their firms realize the full benefits of knowledge management.

Stop by booth #922 at the AALL National Conference and see what’s new in knowledge management."


Via Karen du Toit
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Library Intelligencer » The Scholar/Librarian Goes Digital: New Times Require New Skills and Aptitudes

IFLA Conference Paper:

 

Gillian M McCombs:

 

"The digital age may well be considered a golden age for Special Collections. Treasures that have long been locked in vaults and available only to researchers onsite are now accessible at the click of a mouse from anywhere in the world. However, for every stunning rare book, photograph or art work that is available electronically, thousands more are still inaccessible. Some libraries have been slow to realize the potential for digital access and have not built the infrastructure needed to put these collections out into the public eye. This paper addresses questions such as: are we hiring the right people for Special Collections; are we retooling current curators so that they are technically adept; are we providing our Special Collections Libraries with necessary resources such as marketing and graphics design staff to develop websites for digital exhibits; have they developed a strategic plan that outlines their long-term goals for incorporating technology; what are the consortial opportunities that will help our Special Collections Libraries; are we working closely enough with library schools and rare book programs to ensure that graduates have the skills, aptitude and attitude that we need?"

source: INFODocket

 

http://conference.ifla.org/sites/default/files/files/papers/wlic2012/87-mccombs-en.pdf

 


Via Karen du Toit
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What can we learn from DIY libraries? « Sense & Reference

What can we learn from DIY libraries? « Sense & Reference | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Lane Wilkinson:

"The Little Free Library Project of Madison, Wisconsin is one of the more successful projects, though a lot of attention is also given to urban hacking Department of Urban Betterment project in New York City."

 

1. Librarians don’t define what a library is.

2. Libraries aren’t just about knowledge and information.

3. Printed books are still relevant.

4. Libraries will always find a way.

 

"Just to reiterate, I’m not saying that DIY libraries are a replacement for institutional libraries. I’m not saying that librarians are unnecessary. Institutional libraries serve an essential purpose that should not be diminished and professional librarians are absolutely vital. All I’m trying to point out is that the DIY movement highlights certain social attitudes that libraries and librarians shouldn’t neglect."


Via Trudy Raymakers, Karen du Toit
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