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MOOCs and Librarians - Emerging Technologies - "Massive Open Online Courses"

MOOCs and Librarians - Emerging Technologies - "Massive Open Online Courses" | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Nancy Bellafante:

The Chronicle’s recent article on plagiarism accusations in Coursera courses kicked off my exploration into MOOCs and the role librarians can play. A recent RUSA post on Chasing Reference points to the lack of research assignments in MOOCs and the need for embedded librarians. Even though students enrolled in a MOOC do not typically have access to the parent institution’s fee-based library resources, information literacy and research skills can still be taught and are an important component in courses that ask students to explore complex issues and social problems. Simply providing students with a reading list is not going to teach them to be savvy information consumers who can effectively find authoritative information and critically evaluate sources. So, what’s our first step?

Librarians should  join a  MOOC.

 

Read more: http://www.library.drexel.edu/blogs/technologies/tag/edx/

 

 


Via Karen du Toit
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Karen du Toit's curator insight, December 24, 2012 4:37 AM

Free online classes the future of education > with a direct impact on librarians!

Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from The Information Professional
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Inside the Quest to Put the World's Libraries Online - Atlantic Mobile

Inside the Quest to Put the World's Libraries Online - Atlantic Mobile | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Esther Yi:

"For all their differences, Google and the DPLA do share a major hurdle: Copyright law, which prevents the digitization of orphan works, numbering around 5 million and constituting about 50 to 70 percent of books published after 1923. Orphans are works whose rights holders are not known; they may be dead or unaware of their entitlement. Google's settlement would have given the company license to appropriate orphan works for posterity—a move that would have opened up a trove of previously unavailable works, at the expense of granting Google unprecedented control through litigation. The DPLA faces a similar problem: As some members pointed out in a gathering last year, out-of-print and orphan works—content in the "yellow zone" of copyright—outnumber both public domain and in-copyright works, "making legal reforms necessary for the success of a DPLA," according to meeting notes. Jason Schultz, an assistant professor at UC Berkeley School of Law and a DPLA member focusing on legal issues, says that the coalition wants to strike the right balance between the rights of copyright owners to be properly compensated and the rights of public access. The DPLA will not violate copyright, and it will begin with a foundation of public-domain works. The organization is trying to figure out the best case for fair use of out-of-print or unpublished works to argue that public access to this literature benefits society and serves a "higher" purpose.


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Einstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time - PC Magazine

Einstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time - PC Magazine | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Damon Poeter:

"CBS NewsEinstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time" - 

PC Magazine

 

"Over the next several years, Albert Einstein's complete archives will be made available online by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, curator of the Noble Prize-winning physicist's volumes of private and professional correspondence, research notes, travel diaries, scientific writings, and more.
Einstein's archives include some 80,000 items that have only recently been "cataloged and enhanced with cross referencing technology," according to the Associated Press."

"Knowledge is not about hiding. It's about openness," Hebrew University president Menachem Ben Sasson told the news agency. Former university president Hanoch Gutfreund added: "More than anyone else, [Einstein] expressed his views on every agenda of mankind. Now we have a complete and full picture of that person."
With the help of a grant from the Polonsky Foundation UK, the organization that also assisted in the digitization of Isaac Newton's papers, curators have been "pulling never-before seen items" from a climate-controlled safe and readying them for distribution online as high-resolution images.
The university's new Einstein Archives Online portal, which debuted earlier this week, currently offers visitors about 2,000 documents representing Einstein's life through the year 1921. Subsequent additions to the site will fill out the papers bequeathed by the German Jewish physicist, born in 1879, to Hebrew University upon his death in 1955."


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The bookless library – Is that the future of libraries? | ePublish a Book

The bookless library – Is that the future of libraries? | ePublish a Book | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"The bookless library is increasing a reality, staring in places meant to be the repository of knowledge, university libraries, and gaining ground outside academic grounds.
The New York Public Library is implementing its plan to move many of its books away from its main branch into offsite storage with 24-hour advance request required. Yet it is not the first library to do so. Opening the move was Kansas State University’s engineering school, which went bookless 12 years ago. The University of Texas at San Antonio ditched print for e-books and e-journals in 2010. Stanford University’s engineering school pruned 85 percent of its books last year. Drexel University opened a new library just last month with hardly a single print book – just rows and rows of computers. And Cornell recently announced a similar initiative." 

 

Read more: http://www.epublishabook.com/2012/08/31/the-bookless-library-is-that-the-future-of-libraries/#ixzz257b6gIeO


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Survey Finds Libraries Interested in Collaborating on Online Projects

Survey Finds Libraries Interested in Collaborating on Online Projects | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
And while home pages are being archived, social media collections lag.

Via Karen du Toit, NELLCO
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