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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from Digital preservation and history
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Om Digidaily

En film om digitaliseringsprojektet Digidaily. Kungliga biblioteket och Riksarkivet samarbetar med att ta fram rutiner för att digitalisera alla KB:s dagstid...

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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from The Information Professional
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Inside the Quest to Put the World's Libraries Online - Atlantic Mobile

Inside the Quest to Put the World's Libraries Online - Atlantic Mobile | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Esther Yi:

"For all their differences, Google and the DPLA do share a major hurdle: Copyright law, which prevents the digitization of orphan works, numbering around 5 million and constituting about 50 to 70 percent of books published after 1923. Orphans are works whose rights holders are not known; they may be dead or unaware of their entitlement. Google's settlement would have given the company license to appropriate orphan works for posterity—a move that would have opened up a trove of previously unavailable works, at the expense of granting Google unprecedented control through litigation. The DPLA faces a similar problem: As some members pointed out in a gathering last year, out-of-print and orphan works—content in the "yellow zone" of copyright—outnumber both public domain and in-copyright works, "making legal reforms necessary for the success of a DPLA," according to meeting notes. Jason Schultz, an assistant professor at UC Berkeley School of Law and a DPLA member focusing on legal issues, says that the coalition wants to strike the right balance between the rights of copyright owners to be properly compensated and the rights of public access. The DPLA will not violate copyright, and it will begin with a foundation of public-domain works. The organization is trying to figure out the best case for fair use of out-of-print or unpublished works to argue that public access to this literature benefits society and serves a "higher" purpose.


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Einstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time - PC Magazine

Einstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time - PC Magazine | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Damon Poeter:

"CBS NewsEinstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time" - 

PC Magazine

 

"Over the next several years, Albert Einstein's complete archives will be made available online by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, curator of the Noble Prize-winning physicist's volumes of private and professional correspondence, research notes, travel diaries, scientific writings, and more.
Einstein's archives include some 80,000 items that have only recently been "cataloged and enhanced with cross referencing technology," according to the Associated Press."

"Knowledge is not about hiding. It's about openness," Hebrew University president Menachem Ben Sasson told the news agency. Former university president Hanoch Gutfreund added: "More than anyone else, [Einstein] expressed his views on every agenda of mankind. Now we have a complete and full picture of that person."
With the help of a grant from the Polonsky Foundation UK, the organization that also assisted in the digitization of Isaac Newton's papers, curators have been "pulling never-before seen items" from a climate-controlled safe and readying them for distribution online as high-resolution images.
The university's new Einstein Archives Online portal, which debuted earlier this week, currently offers visitors about 2,000 documents representing Einstein's life through the year 1921. Subsequent additions to the site will fill out the papers bequeathed by the German Jewish physicist, born in 1879, to Hebrew University upon his death in 1955."


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Library Intelligencer » The Scholar/Librarian Goes Digital: New Times Require New Skills and Aptitudes

IFLA Conference Paper:

 

Gillian M McCombs:

 

"The digital age may well be considered a golden age for Special Collections. Treasures that have long been locked in vaults and available only to researchers onsite are now accessible at the click of a mouse from anywhere in the world. However, for every stunning rare book, photograph or art work that is available electronically, thousands more are still inaccessible. Some libraries have been slow to realize the potential for digital access and have not built the infrastructure needed to put these collections out into the public eye. This paper addresses questions such as: are we hiring the right people for Special Collections; are we retooling current curators so that they are technically adept; are we providing our Special Collections Libraries with necessary resources such as marketing and graphics design staff to develop websites for digital exhibits; have they developed a strategic plan that outlines their long-term goals for incorporating technology; what are the consortial opportunities that will help our Special Collections Libraries; are we working closely enough with library schools and rare book programs to ensure that graduates have the skills, aptitude and attitude that we need?"

source: INFODocket

 

http://conference.ifla.org/sites/default/files/files/papers/wlic2012/87-mccombs-en.pdf

 


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Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video

Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Ant Miller (BBC Research and Development Blog):

"In this second part of the Archive Research film we take a look at the key challenges addressed by the 'preservation' work of R&D and the BBC Information & Archives teams.  With interviews from Dr Richard Wright, Adrian Williams of I&A and others, Alex Mansfield gets to the bottom of the latest technologies being used to ensure that the critical challenge of obsolescence is handled, and handled effectively and efficiency.

With huge files, and critical quality checks essential to preserving the legacy of the archive, the best efforts of engineers and archivists are being applied to saving this content for the future."


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