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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from Digital preservation and history
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Top 10 Digital Preservation Developments of 2012 | The Signal: Digital Preservation

Top 10 Digital Preservation Developments of 2012 | The Signal: Digital Preservation | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
Top 10 Digital Preservation Developments of 2012. A blog post at "The Signal: Digital Preservation" on 2013-01-14.

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The Economics of Long-Term Digital Storage

Economics of digital preservation. Or, paper vs bits. It's on!

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Archivists file in for digital congress "A climate of change" - PS News #ICA2012

"More than 1,000 archivists from 90 countries have come to Brisbane this week to try and solve the challenges of the digital age.

   Hosted by the National Archives of Australia, the International Council on Archives (ICA) Congress is being held until Thursday (24 August) at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.
   The ICA is dedicated to the effective management of records and the preservation, care and use of the world’s archival heritage through its representation of records and archive professionals around the world."

 

Full program can be accessed here: http://ica2012.com/files/data/program/Program-matrix-1508.pdf

 

1,000 meet to explore challenges   

It is the first time the four-yearly congress has been held in Australia and this year’s theme A Climate of Change will be explored by a number of keynote speakers including the Head Archivist for the United States of America, David Ferreiro, who will present the topic, ‘Archives in a world of social media’.


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Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video

Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Ant Miller (BBC Research and Development Blog):

"In this second part of the Archive Research film we take a look at the key challenges addressed by the 'preservation' work of R&D and the BBC Information & Archives teams.  With interviews from Dr Richard Wright, Adrian Williams of I&A and others, Alex Mansfield gets to the bottom of the latest technologies being used to ensure that the critical challenge of obsolescence is handled, and handled effectively and efficiency.

With huge files, and critical quality checks essential to preserving the legacy of the archive, the best efforts of engineers and archivists are being applied to saving this content for the future."


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Talk with David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States | Archives and Public History Digital

Talk with David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States | Archives and Public History Digital | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
Talk with David S.Ferriero, Archivist of the United States | Archives and Public History Digital - http://t.co/pvreAu3A...

 

"While the Archivist did not deliver a formal speech, the wide ranging Q&A touched upon many of the current conversations and concerns within the archival community.

One important topic discussed was the role of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and of its leadership to the larger archival community. As we all know, NARA safeguards and preserves the most important records of the U.S. government yet it was interesting to learn that only equates to roughly 3% of all records created. The protocols of NARA have often been reflected in the practices of private or independent archives and in the advent of electronic formats, many repositories are watching how NARA handles ingesting these records. The Archivist was enthusiastic about how NARA could help the larger archival community and we hope that future Archivists of the United States will share this vision.

Mr. Ferriero views the archiving of electronic records as an exciting development and challenge for our profession. As such, he discussed the proprietary software Lockheed is developing for NARA to ingest digital formats and it was encouraging to hear of the Archivist’s enthusiasm for open-source software that could be used elsewhere in the archival community."


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Houstonians set up underground libraries in response to book ban, by Halli Jordan

Houstonians set up underground libraries in response to book ban, by Halli Jordan | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Hallie Jordan

"After learning about a law in Arizona that has gotten books about Mexican-American history banned from classrooms, a group of Houstonians responded by collecting over 1,000 of the banned books, packing them in cars and taking them in a caravan across Texas and New Mexico to Tucson, Arizona.
Known as “librotraficantes,” or book traffickers, a group led by Houston Community College professor and author Tony Diaz has taken it upon itself to help the students in Arizona to have access to the books that have been part of their school district’s curriculum for years.
In 2010 Arizona passed House Bill 2281 that specifies that public school courses must not teach material that conflicts with the United States government."


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Pinterest for museums and libraries - Slideshare by Joe Murphy

Webcast, Pinterest for Museums and Libraries, I taught on March 28, 2012, produced by LearningTimes.

https://bitly.com/pinterestwebcast

 


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New trend? Librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world | ArchivesNext

Kate T:

"New trend?Librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world | ArchivesNext http://t.co/eAGshlcC..."

 

"I’m referring to this almost ebullient post by the Library of Congress’ Butch Lazorchak on the Signal blog, “#sxswLAM: Libraries, Archives and Museums in an Interactive World.” It’s a beautiful vision, and it’s great to hear that participating in the South By Southwest Interactive Conference has given him this kind of warm rosy optimistic glow.

Butch’s post bolsters my claim that “blurring of organizational roles” is a significant trend for archives. In an earlier draft of my trends post I had a list of trends I wanted to see, and although I didn’t phrase it in quite the same way, “librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world” is pretty close. It’s my hope (and Butch’s vision) that LAM professionals can emerge as leaders in the evolving digital world. But this will only happen if more of them engage in wider discussions, as some LAM representatives are doing."

 

Kate T's version of Trendswatch 2012 - The Archive's edition: http://www.archivesnext.com/?p=2608

 


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Internet Archive’s Repository Collects Thousands of Books

Internet Archive’s Repository Collects Thousands of Books | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By DAVID STREITFELD:

"As society embraces all forms of digital entertainment, a latter-day Noah is looking the other way. Brewster Kahle, who runs the Internet Archive, a nonprofit, hopes to collect one copy of every book."

 

Richmond, Califf: "In a wooden warehouse in this industrial suburb, the 20th century is being stored in case of digital disaster.

Forty-foot shipping containers stacked two by two are stuffed with the most enduring, as well as some of the most forgettable, books of the era. Every week, 20,000 new volumes arrive, many of them donations from libraries and universities thrilled to unload material that has no place in the Internet Age."


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Hooray, we're digital natives – so who preserves our culture? #BigData #archives

Hooray, we're digital natives – so who preserves our culture? #BigData #archives | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Sue McKemmish & Andrew Wilson:

"It’s estimated that in 2011 a truly staggering 1.8 zettabytes of digital information was created. Or to put it in more meaningful terms, that’s 57.5 billion 32-gigabyte iPads full.

Recent articles about this “digital deluge” warn of an approaching “digital dark age” if this vast amount of digital information isn’t preserved for posterity.

The old refrain that “storage is cheap, just keep everything” was never true. Recently the global market intelligence firm IDCestimated that the world’s demand for storage is increasing by 60% a year.

Given market research firm IHS iSuppli estimates hard disk storage densities will only improve by 19% a year for the next five years, and IT budgets are growing at an annual rate between 0 and 2%, there is clearly a looming storage crisis.

 

 

The challenges involved in preserving the huge datasets created by governments, businesses and research institutions have prompted some dire predictions about the loss of digital history."


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International Council on Archives Congress - Twitter Stream via Storify

National Archives of Australia:

"We're capturing all of the tweets from the #ICA_2012 hashtag.
Please note the volume is beyond what we've expected so some may be missing - but most are here!"


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Who will preserve the past for future generations?

Who will preserve the past for future generations? | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

J.L. GRANATSTEIN:

"Reducing library resources and breaking up the national archives will cause irreparable harm to nationhood..." > Library and Archives Canada

 

 


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Future Proof – Protecting our digital future » Our top 5 – Why recordkeeping is awesome! #archday12

Future Proof – Protecting our digital future » Our top 5 – Why recordkeeping is awesome! #archday12 | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"June 9 is International Archives Day and together with our blog sisters at Archives Outside, Future Proof is celebrating! Go and check out Archives Outside’s Archives are Awesome post while here at Future Proof we are celebrating all things recordkeeping.

 

Here are our top 5 reasons why we think recordkeeping is awesome.

1. Good recordkeeping promotes efficiency

2. Good recordkeeping supports better decision making and reuse of information

3. Good recordkeeping supports accountability

4. Good recordkeeping adds value to your business

5. Good recordkeeping mitigates risks to your organisation"

 

 


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What is Linked Open Data? Europeana releases an animation to explain | Open GLAM - Vimeo animation

What is Linked Open Data? Europeana releases an animation to explain | Open GLAM - Vimeo animation | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Joris Pekel is a Berlin based Community Coordinator for the OKFN and works specifically with digital heritage. He is co-editor of the Open GLAM blog:

 

"Linked Open Data is getting more attention from the information world, as well as from memory institutions. But what exactly is it and more important, why is it a good thing? To explain this, Europeana has released an animation."

 

 


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For Archivists, ‘Occupy’ Movement Presents New Challenges - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

For Archivists, ‘Occupy’ Movement Presents New Challenges - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
RT @tadawes: For Archivists, ‘Occupy’ Movement Presents New Challenges - Wired Campus - http://t.co/iKpx3Hmg...

 

By Jeffrey R. Young:

"Howard Besser, a New York University archivist, recently got into a shouting match at an Occupy protest, making a case for why the activists should preserve records of their activities.“Within the Occupy movement there’s a huge suspicion of traditional organizations, including libraries and universities,” Mr. Besser explained Monday at the spring meeting of the Coalition for Networked Information.

The shouting match was an extreme moment, but Mr. Besser and other archivists on a panel here explained that they have had to take unusual steps to try to gather a snapshot for future scholars of the nationwide Occupy protests, which call attention to income inequality in the United States. Those steps—including distributing postcards promoting archiving at protests, developing automated systems to download photos posted online, and asking participants to vote on which images are most important for the historic record—could serve as a model for preserving future events."


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Einstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time - PC Magazine

Einstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time - PC Magazine | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Damon Poeter:

"CBS NewsEinstein's Complete Archives to Go Online for the First Time" - 

PC Magazine

 

"Over the next several years, Albert Einstein's complete archives will be made available online by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, curator of the Noble Prize-winning physicist's volumes of private and professional correspondence, research notes, travel diaries, scientific writings, and more.
Einstein's archives include some 80,000 items that have only recently been "cataloged and enhanced with cross referencing technology," according to the Associated Press."

"Knowledge is not about hiding. It's about openness," Hebrew University president Menachem Ben Sasson told the news agency. Former university president Hanoch Gutfreund added: "More than anyone else, [Einstein] expressed his views on every agenda of mankind. Now we have a complete and full picture of that person."
With the help of a grant from the Polonsky Foundation UK, the organization that also assisted in the digitization of Isaac Newton's papers, curators have been "pulling never-before seen items" from a climate-controlled safe and readying them for distribution online as high-resolution images.
The university's new Einstein Archives Online portal, which debuted earlier this week, currently offers visitors about 2,000 documents representing Einstein's life through the year 1921. Subsequent additions to the site will fill out the papers bequeathed by the German Jewish physicist, born in 1879, to Hebrew University upon his death in 1955."


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US National Archives director David Ferriero - Boston Globe

US National Archives director David Ferriero - Boston Globe | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Bryan Bender

David Ferriero - "The man entrusted with America’s documentary heritage - including the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution"

 

"Ferriero now directs the National Archives in Washington, the first librarian to hold the post of official “collector in chief.’’ He not only oversees 12 billion pages and 40 million photographs that tell America’s story, he referees release of America’s oldest secrets, from the formula for invisible ink to battle plans for the Spanish-American War.

He favors openness, he says, but agencies cling to a maze of often-contradictory secrecy rules and a deep-seated culture to lock away even innocuous information. “While progress has been made,’’ Ferriero said, “we still have a huge problem.’’

Ferriero’s primary job is ensuring the 275 executive branch agencies retain the most important government records for posterity.

But he also oversees the National Declassification Center, created by President Obama by executive order in 2009. That makes him point man for an aggressive effort to try to release, by the end of next year, a backlog of an estimated 400 million records that are more than 25 years old."


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