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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from The Information Professional
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Small Island Librarian: Corporate online storytelling for libraries?

Small Island Librarian: Corporate online storytelling for libraries? | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
Small Island Librarian: Corporate online storytelling: for libraries?

 

Posted by Mark-Shane Scale:

 

"In my view, there needs to be a course within library schools that will deals with institutional digital storytelling. This is because, in the age of social media and Library 2.0, libraries need to move online and tell their stories. Libraries need to find ways of connecting with their users and potential users in the online world. We need content on our websites and a social media presence that is constantly updated and engaging, reminding our users that we are a channel to credible information sources. Our Websites must now be more like blogs or online magazines, with a constant flow of information. We should not only tell users what we have, but also post commentaries and view points, to represent the information that we have within our collections. In short, we need to take a page from Coca Cola's book on corporate storytelling. If Coca Cola is thinking about becoming a publisher, why not libraries?"


Via Karen du Toit
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Survey Finds Libraries Interested in Collaborating on Online Projects

Survey Finds Libraries Interested in Collaborating on Online Projects | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
And while home pages are being archived, social media collections lag.

Via Karen du Toit, NELLCO
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Special Collections Librarianship: a Brief Map of the Field by Katie Birkwood - Slideshare

Presentation about special collections librarianship compiled for the CILIP New Professionals Day 2012 (11 May, London).

 

This presentation is all about special collections, what they are, the functions of a special collections librarian, how to get into special collections, and the role of special collections librarianship.


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa, Karen du Toit
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Rescooped by Errol A. Adams JD/MLS from The Information Professional
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A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library

A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Catherine:  

"Special libraries are found within many different types of organizations, such as broadcast networks. Many have internal libraries and librarians which provide archival, research, information retrieval and reference services. These library collections are often closed to the public, focused on serving the needs of direct staff and affiliates. Librarianship within media organizations is a fascinating part of special libraries. In an article from American Journalism Review, in 1995, the 'news librarian' was described as, "the collectors, managers, and re-distributors of the organization's primary product, information. This is critical in all stages of information's flow through the organization – initial information gathering for use in news reporting, in the collection of the news product into databases, in the repackaging of information created by the organization into new products." Much has changed in the industry in the last fifteen years, however the role of collector and manager of the organization's content is still a vital one.

NPR is a non-profit privately and publicly funded membership media organization. The content produced by NPR is nationally syndicated to over 900 public radio stations in the United States. The NPR library does not have a publicly accessible website, as their collections are not available for circulation and reference outside of NPR affiliated patrons. The collection consists of archival audio of NPR produced shows, collections of commercial music and spoken word (films, tv shows, speeches, poetry). Library staff do have a twitter account that is well worth following. The tweets often highlight stories on the NPR website such as this one about the The Most Gigantal, Behemothian Thesaurus In The World"

 

- Includes links to all related websites of NPR.


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Library Intelligencer » The Scholar/Librarian Goes Digital: New Times Require New Skills and Aptitudes

IFLA Conference Paper:

 

Gillian M McCombs:

 

"The digital age may well be considered a golden age for Special Collections. Treasures that have long been locked in vaults and available only to researchers onsite are now accessible at the click of a mouse from anywhere in the world. However, for every stunning rare book, photograph or art work that is available electronically, thousands more are still inaccessible. Some libraries have been slow to realize the potential for digital access and have not built the infrastructure needed to put these collections out into the public eye. This paper addresses questions such as: are we hiring the right people for Special Collections; are we retooling current curators so that they are technically adept; are we providing our Special Collections Libraries with necessary resources such as marketing and graphics design staff to develop websites for digital exhibits; have they developed a strategic plan that outlines their long-term goals for incorporating technology; what are the consortial opportunities that will help our Special Collections Libraries; are we working closely enough with library schools and rare book programs to ensure that graduates have the skills, aptitude and attitude that we need?"

source: INFODocket

 

http://conference.ifla.org/sites/default/files/files/papers/wlic2012/87-mccombs-en.pdf

 


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Collection development for law libraries — Slaw

Collection development for law libraries — Slaw | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Shaunna Mireau:

"I attended an excellent session on collection development for law libraries at the Canadian Association of Law Libraries Conference last week."

 

"Collection development symposium – audience suggestions:

- Continuous need for re-evaluating your collection, talking to your users and finding out their requirements.
- Resource sharing agreements and relationships. Look to work together with different library units. Divide up responsibility for different topics.
- Negotiate for the portion of the content you want (commentary/analysis).
- Work with the publishers on bundling of the electronic commentary on their sites with pricing and licensing that works for the users.
- Consortia and interlibrary loans.
- Visit vendor booths and give feedback. Request bound formats – talk to authors.
- Needs assessments – feedback from front-line librarians.
- Get your library community involved. Building of relationships and review of collection.
- Communicate and build trust with the vendors.
- Collaboration with other library communities.
- Collection usage statistics are key.
I- mplementing rotational cancellation of loose-leaf services."


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New Introducing the Library Marketing Toolkit website! – Stephen's Lighthouse

New Introducing the Library Marketing Toolkit website! – Stephen's Lighthouse | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

The Library Marketing Toolkit website, by Ned Potter! [@theREALwikiman]

 

"The site is essentially designed to give you lots of practical advice on how to market your library – be that public, academic, special or archive. There are tools and resources, lots of useful links, new case studies which will be added to on an ongoing basis, and there’s info about the Library Marketing Toolkit book and its contributors.

There’s also a blog, which will give tips and aim to highlight the best (and sometimes the worst) marketing from libraries around the world. The first post is Marketing libraries with new technologies: what you need to know, and what to do next and features this presentation, which I gave yesterday at an Academic and Research Libraries Group conference on new technologies in libraries”

 

Blog post: Marketing libraries... http://www.librarymarketingtoolkit.com/2012/05/marketing-libraries-with-new.html

 


Via Guus van den Brekel, Karen du Toit
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Keeping and Deleting Patron Records in Law Libraries » VoxPopuLII

Keeping and Deleting Patron Records in Law Libraries » VoxPopuLII | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Benjamin Keele:

"As researchers use materials in libraries, their actions tend to generate records—research trails in digital databases, lists of borrowed books, and correspondence with librarians. Most of the time, these records are innocuous, but to facilitate freedom of inquiry, librarians generally hold these records as confidential. This confidentiality is especially important in law libraries because legal matters can be very sensitive and stressful. Researchers implicitly trust librarians with at least hints of concerns the researchers would prefer not be generally known. If researchers knew any records of their questions could become known to others, some researchers would avoid using library collections or asking librarians for advice, guidance that very well may help them find valuable information.

In her interesting post, Meg Leta points out that, despite some exhortations that information on Web lasts forever, most information now online will disappear at some point. Websites go down when their owners fail to pay hosting fees. Data is deleted, either by purpose or mistake. A file sitting on a drive or disc will, without maintenance, eventually becomes inaccessible because the storage media has decayed or because the hardware and software needed to read the file has become obsolete. Since information will tend to vanish without action on our part, Leta suggests we should instead focus on actively saving information that is worth keeping.

Leta makes an excellent point, but I’d suggest that in addition to thinking carefully about what information needs to be kept, legal professionals also should consider whether certain types of information warrant purposeful destruction. I’d also suggest that for law libraries, patrons should be given the ability to retain, either through the library or themselves, records of their use of library resources."


Via Karen du Toit
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