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Libraries Changed My Life

Libraries Changed My Life | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
Real life accounts from library patrons whose lives have been changed for the better by libraries.

 

Libraries Changed My Life (LCML) is the brainchild of two librarians from two parts of the country. Ingrid is a children’s and teen librarian from New York City. Natalie is a systems librarian from rural Florida. Together we’re hoping to create a place where people can tell their library stories, and those who are questioning the value of libraries can see their amazing impact. LCML is an independent, grassroots movement to spread library love across the country.

Why we’re here:

Libraries are valuable—and valued. In addition to traditional services like book lending, research help and children’s programs (still the services Americans value most), libraries offer free wifi, technology training, free or low-cost public meeting spaces, affordable printing, access to music and the arts, and other services our neighborhoods need.


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, May 16, 2013 7:45 AM

Libraries are valubale - accounts from patrons!

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Maker Librarian | Making the Future, One Library at a Time

Maker Librarian | Making the Future, One Library at a Time | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
RT @homeysimpson: new resource for librarians who want to learn about makers, hackerspaces, the participatory library and more: http://t.co/eQshWzOM

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Great resource for maker librarians!
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16 Resources for Librarians Preparing for the Mayan Apocalypse, by Ellyssa Kroski

16 Resources for Librarians Preparing for the Mayan Apocalypse, by Ellyssa Kroski | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
Librarians are prepared for anything. Why? Because we do our background research and have plenty of resources to consult for any given event. So, why should the Mayan Apocalypse be any different?

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, December 14, 2012 2:48 AM

Valuable to librarians who want to pass on the information:

The information, the resources and the apps! 

 

(Librarian humour!)

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How to kill a library, By Kitty Pope

How to kill a library, By Kitty Pope | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"[...]there are more than a few ways to kill a library.

For example:

√ Stop believing in the libraries mission. Do we really believe in the freedom to read, learn and discover?

√ Spend less time with the board. The ideal public library board would meet 4 times per year and agrees with everything the CEO recommended.

√ Stop talking to your customers. What do they know any way? And on the same topic, stop consulting staff. It is a huge time waster.

√ Don’t worry about the future and how you will get there. Sustainability is not an issue with which libraries need to be concerned. After all, we’ve have survived for hundreds of years.

√ Stop telling the library story. Everyone has heard our story.

√ Accept that the library building is old and you don’t need to keep renovating, painting, and updating it. It is what it is.

√ Accept that just like instant coffee killed the coffee bean, the e-book will kill the printed book.

√ Stop promoting the product; everyone knows about literacy and lifelong learning.

√ Stop empowering staff, and stop training them. They should come to us fully trained.

√ Stop all this talk about innovation. It just makes for more work.

√ And, for heaven’s sake, stop changing the rules and our traditions. It’s annoying!"


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The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator

The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
How could it REALLY change libraries?“@libraryfuture: The iPad Mini’s meaning & impact on libraries http://t.co/sh54FFJN”...

 

"For Libraries:
With this smaller device, the reach of the Apple iOS and resources through it expands to more of our patrons (those preferring the smaller device size and smoother integration into their lives) and into more of their spaces. So be prepared for more iOS mobile engagement with your content and services.

For librarians’ use: the Mini may be better suited for mobile library staff: easier use with Square and mobile payments, more portable for roving reference, for checking out tablets to users."


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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Teacher-Librarians

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Teacher-Librarians | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

>A great list of resources for all levels of librarians.

 

"Here's a megalist for my fellow media specialists/teacher-librarians. It's taken a while to gather all the information and I will continue to add to this page. Currently there are close to 185 sites listed. There is SO MUCH information out there! Please feel free to add your suggestions!"


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The Library of Congress has announced that they will implement RDA cataloging on March 31, 2013

The Library of Congress has announced that they will implement RDA cataloging on March 31, 2013 | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

The Library of Congress has announced that they will implement RDA cataloging on March 31, 2013 http://www.rdatoolkit.org/content/364

 

 


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Library Intelligencer » The Scholar/Librarian Goes Digital: New Times Require New Skills and Aptitudes

IFLA Conference Paper:

 

Gillian M McCombs:

 

"The digital age may well be considered a golden age for Special Collections. Treasures that have long been locked in vaults and available only to researchers onsite are now accessible at the click of a mouse from anywhere in the world. However, for every stunning rare book, photograph or art work that is available electronically, thousands more are still inaccessible. Some libraries have been slow to realize the potential for digital access and have not built the infrastructure needed to put these collections out into the public eye. This paper addresses questions such as: are we hiring the right people for Special Collections; are we retooling current curators so that they are technically adept; are we providing our Special Collections Libraries with necessary resources such as marketing and graphics design staff to develop websites for digital exhibits; have they developed a strategic plan that outlines their long-term goals for incorporating technology; what are the consortial opportunities that will help our Special Collections Libraries; are we working closely enough with library schools and rare book programs to ensure that graduates have the skills, aptitude and attitude that we need?"

source: INFODocket

 

http://conference.ifla.org/sites/default/files/files/papers/wlic2012/87-mccombs-en.pdf

 


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The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management « Legal Current

The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management « Legal Current | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management http://t.co/lXh0JS6t...

 

Gretchen DeSutter: 

"As firms strive for greater efficiency and delivering greater value to clients, knowledge management system can help firms by streamlining search.

Because of their skill set and experience, librarians are uniquely positioned to help firms get the most out of their knowledge management systems. According to the 2011 ALM Law Librarian "Survey, 57 percent are playing a more active role in KM than three years ago."

In the end, it’s all about placing the right information into the user’s hands at the right time and in the right format. Librarians know how to do that better than anyone, and those skills can make the difference in helping their firms realize the full benefits of knowledge management.

Stop by booth #922 at the AALL National Conference and see what’s new in knowledge management."


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Author's Corner: An Excerpt from What Do Employers Want? - Hiring Librarians

Author's Corner: An Excerpt from What Do Employers Want? - Hiring Librarians | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"Priscilla Shontz and Richard Murray, the editors of LISCareer, a rich collection of articles written by practicing librarians on a variety of career development topics, are the authors of a new book entitled What Do Employers Want? A Guide for Library Science Students. Shontz and Murray cover topics such as Practical Experience, Professional Identity and How Employers Hire, basing their advice on interviews with people who hire librarians. The book moves beyond job search insights, outlining career development strategies for students and new graduates in a manner that is both funny and frank. I am pleased to be able to offer you an excerpt from chapter one: “What Do Employers Want?”


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A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library

A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Catherine:  

"Special libraries are found within many different types of organizations, such as broadcast networks. Many have internal libraries and librarians which provide archival, research, information retrieval and reference services. These library collections are often closed to the public, focused on serving the needs of direct staff and affiliates. Librarianship within media organizations is a fascinating part of special libraries. In an article from American Journalism Review, in 1995, the 'news librarian' was described as, "the collectors, managers, and re-distributors of the organization's primary product, information. This is critical in all stages of information's flow through the organization – initial information gathering for use in news reporting, in the collection of the news product into databases, in the repackaging of information created by the organization into new products." Much has changed in the industry in the last fifteen years, however the role of collector and manager of the organization's content is still a vital one.

NPR is a non-profit privately and publicly funded membership media organization. The content produced by NPR is nationally syndicated to over 900 public radio stations in the United States. The NPR library does not have a publicly accessible website, as their collections are not available for circulation and reference outside of NPR affiliated patrons. The collection consists of archival audio of NPR produced shows, collections of commercial music and spoken word (films, tv shows, speeches, poetry). Library staff do have a twitter account that is well worth following. The tweets often highlight stories on the NPR website such as this one about the The Most Gigantal, Behemothian Thesaurus In The World"

 

- Includes links to all related websites of NPR.


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10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities

10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Staff Writers:

"In honor of School Library Month, check out the ways libraries are going to blossom in the coming years."

 

"[...] the almost uncanny ability to consistently adapt to the changing demands of the local populace and emerging technology alike. The library system probably won’t disappear anytime soon, but rather, see itself blossoming into something new and exciting in congruence with today’s myriad informational demands."

 

1. More technology

2. Sensory story times

3. Better outreach to ESOL and ESL adults & children

4. Automation

5. Emphasizing community space

6. More social media savvy

7. Digital media labs

8. Electronic outposts

9. Crowdsourcing

10. More active librarians


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Librarianship Is a Global Profession... If You Want It to Be, by Jan Holmquist

Librarianship Is a Global Profession... If You Want It to Be, by Jan Holmquist | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
RT @janholmquist: It Is a Global Profession...

Jan Holmquist:

"One of the things I have learned about this profession in recent years (but wish I had known when I was brand new to libraries) is that it is in fact a global profession. The economy is global, information is global, and a lot of (popular) culture is global too. It makes sense, then, that the people navigating all of this are part of a global profession too."

[...]

"I have been involved in projects with people from all over the globe. Right now a library is being built in India crowdfunded by librarians from all over the world via Buy India a Library project. Another crowdfunding project with a worldwide team, Help This Week in Libraries, made a huge difference for that knowledge sharing library show. I am working on another global project with an American librarian right now. I can’t share details just yet, but you will hear more soon."

 

- Blog post by Jessica Olin


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As a manager, how can I support our library staff who use social media on our behalf? | From the floor

"What kind of support should I be asking for from management?" and "How can I support our staff?"

1. Give them your trust - Wholeheartedly.

2. Give them dedicated time

3. Get out of their way


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 18, 2013 4:49 AM

Managing social media in the library! Good tips!

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MOOCs and Librarians - Emerging Technologies - "Massive Open Online Courses"

MOOCs and Librarians - Emerging Technologies - "Massive Open Online Courses" | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Nancy Bellafante:

The Chronicle’s recent article on plagiarism accusations in Coursera courses kicked off my exploration into MOOCs and the role librarians can play. A recent RUSA post on Chasing Reference points to the lack of research assignments in MOOCs and the need for embedded librarians. Even though students enrolled in a MOOC do not typically have access to the parent institution’s fee-based library resources, information literacy and research skills can still be taught and are an important component in courses that ask students to explore complex issues and social problems. Simply providing students with a reading list is not going to teach them to be savvy information consumers who can effectively find authoritative information and critically evaluate sources. So, what’s our first step?

Librarians should  join a  MOOC.

 

Read more: http://www.library.drexel.edu/blogs/technologies/tag/edx/

 

 


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, December 24, 2012 4:37 AM

Free online classes the future of education > with a direct impact on librarians!

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From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge

From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China. (...) - by Adrian Giordani, MyScienceWork blog, 27 november 2012


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, November 29, 2012 7:15 AM

"Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China.

This article was originally published in International Science Grid This Week as “Enabling knowledge creation in data-driven science”
http://www.isgtw.org/feature/enabling-knowledge-creation-data-driven-science

[...]

 

"To answer this problem [of data deluge], some are creating infrastructures and software that are set to radically transform the way scientific publishing is done, which has been little changed for centuries.

Research publishing 2.0

While a number of scientific institutes, European Commission-funded projects, and research communities work on establishing common data policies and open-access infrastructures to make research data more searchable, shareable, and citable, the life sciences are looking at data analysis and publishing approaches that move the computer to the data rather than moving the data to the computers"

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8 Tips for the Care & Feeding of the Reluctant Tech User, by @gwynethjones at The Daring Librarian

8 Tips for the Care & Feeding of the Reluctant Tech User, by @gwynethjones at The Daring Librarian | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"Teaching tech in isolation never works. When a reluctant tech user learns how to do something with a project about which they're personally passionate, they're gonna be instantly engaged, work hard at it, and feel super exultant when it works!"

 

1. Make it personal

2. Show and tell

3. Small steps, etc"


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Internet Librarians—The Power to Transform Libraries

by Cindy Shamel :

"The 16th annual Internet Librarian conference recently concluded in Monterey, Calif. More than a thousand registrants and 215 speakers tackled the topic Transformational Power of Internet Librarians. While the sessions ranged from accessibility of digital content to web analytics, two themes took center stage: the future role of libraries and the reality of ebooks. As it turns out, some would assert that the future role of libraries depends upon the ultimate impact of ebooks.
Role of Libraries

Depending upon whom you ask, libraries should serve as a platform for networking, return to their core competency as the keeper of print books, or launch new products and services as the enabler of content creation.

In the opening keynote address, David Weinberger advocated for the library as a platform for people, ideas, and works delivered through tools and services. Weinberger is senior researcher, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, co-director, Harvard Innovation Lab, and author of Too Big to Know. He says, rather than attempting to collect knowledge in the form of published works, librarians can advance knowledge through public learning, generous sharing, and the power of iteration. Weinberger used the experience of software developers as an example of fast, efficient, and effective learning as they collaborate through tutorials, versioning, and social connections to tweak and improve programs. He posited that libraries can serve as a networking platform that “provides the resources that let others create and flourish.”


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Fostering Female Technology Leadership in Libraries - The Digital Shift

Fostering Female Technology Leadership in Libraries - The Digital Shift | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
This.On the gender gap in tech workers, by @rtennant http://t.co/rQ0310ST...

 

"[...]we can change things:


1. Work to change the culture. In many library tech situations, whether it is a chatroom or a server room, it’s still a men’s locker room atmosphere. 
2. Support and encourage women who try. 
3. Recruit and support women who are interested. 
4. If you are well along in your career, mentor promising women. 
5. Be verbose and inclusive with explanations, and spare with posturing."


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Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012 by Colleen Egget

We are talking about reference and how it is changing in UPLIFT this week: August 15 at the Utah State Library & August 17 2012 in Ephraim, at the Karen A. Hunstman Library on the Snow College campus.

 

Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012:

 

- Traditional reference work is less relevant to the needs of users
- Rather than worrying about reference’s demise, many librarians have been energized by their newly expanded roles
- Reconfigured or eliminated reference desks
- Consolidated desks and services
- Librarian and support staff work together on the one main desk
- Librarian can handle more complicated questions
- Increased training for support staff to handle basic reference questions
- The reference interview is as pertinent as ever
- Roving reference is more important—getting out to where people are
- Expansion of self-service options (self-checkout, online group study room reservations, self-service holds, and touch screen frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) on your website/ library catalog
- Reconfiguring online reference resources for smartphones and other mobile devices
- Librarians are exploring new roles in reaching out to meet information needs
- Reference through the stacks and other indirect means
- Reduction/elimination of print reference collections
- Greater marketing and promotion of online resources and services
- Librarians will spend less time staffing desks and more time outside of library walls
- Online reference: email, chat, Instant Messaging, and SMS (short messaging services) reaches users who may not visit the library
- Online reference requires continual marketing to be successful
- Collaborating with other organizations will do as much to keep libraries alive as any project or program
- Embedded librarianship: becoming an integral part. Getting close to users by getting out into the community; being actively present with the user at the point of need.
- The big shift: we’re not doing things “for” the community, but we’re being a part “of” the community
- Libraries are shifting from the physical to the virtual facilities and media; from an individual to a community focus; from being a collection library to being a creation library; from being an archive to being a portal


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What can librarians/info pros do for your business? | NKS Info Services

"What can a librarian or information professional by any other name do for your business? Besides the tradtional research, print and electronic collection management, knowledge management, and so on? 

[...] 

- publish articles in industry venues that advance recognition of your business and/or issues of importance to you,
- provide data management, data curation, and project management in support of helping you and your business to build on its own knowledge base and/or meet federal agency expectations for research management , if you receive federal funding for said research,
- offer GIS mapping of data and other information visualization skills,
- educate your staff by offering brown bag seminars, webinars, and other events on various timely topics,
- deliver regular industry-related news in various easy-to-digest formats for busy staff and managers,
- add great value to your technology committees or other IT-committees (think of the experience your librarian/info pro has with online research tools, electronic subscriptions, software tools, and the information-seeking needs of your staff),
and so much more!"


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Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms

Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Carl Grant:

"At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, I gave the keynote talk at the NISO Update Session. My goal was to give attendees some thoughts about how important it is that they participate actively in the shaping of the new cloud-computing platforms which are are emerging from a number of organizations, including OCLC, Ex Libris, Serials Solution, Innovative and Kuali. I stated that the main reason for our participation as librarians is simply this: So we can ensure the value of librarianship is contained within and amplified by these new technological foundations.

 

There were three key points I talked about us doing in order to accomplish this. They were:

1. The mission and value of librarianship have to be embedded in the software you’re using.

2. Defining our future is a task of participation, NOT representation.

3. For our services to have value they must offer differentiation."


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Google This, by Terry Ballard < One year of my life | Librarian on the edge - for your library #books

Google This, by Terry Ballard < One year of my life | Librarian on the edge - for your library #books | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Terry Ballard:

"Last April I got a contract with Chandos Publishing of Oxfordshire to write a book called "Google this: Putting Google and other social media sites to work for your library." 

http://www.terryballard.org/googlethis.html ;

"As I had envisioned originally, I found dozens of librarians who had done great things with social media and got their stories. Whenever possible, I added cookbook-like instructions for crating things like IGoogle gadgets or captioning videos in YouTube. Being a longtime quote collector, I was able to find an apt quote for every chapter beginning. In the end, I see this as the capstone of a career that has gone on for nearly 50 years."


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Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes

Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

R David Lankes:

A librarian plays devil's advocate for those who argue libraries are obsolete (but there is a happy ending).

 

"There are few of us who can know the exact moment their career ended. However when a professor of library science argues libraries are obsolete against a Harvard law school professor and the head of the lead funding agency in the field I think that moment has arrived. This was where I found myself April 18th when I took part in an Oxford-style debate as part of Harvard Library Strategic Conversations. The idea was to mix humor with serious debate on the proposition that “Libraries are Obsolete.” I was asked to argue for the proposition.Now this is a rather odd position to be in since I have spent my career arguing exactly the opposite, but in the spirit of playing devil’s advocate, and the fact that I have tenure, I jumped in. After all, if we don’t honestly debate the point, how can we truly be sure we are not headed towards obsolescence [more on my rational see this post]."

http://quartz.syr.edu/blog/?p=1557

 


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US Advises Librarians, Scientists On IT - AllAfrica.com #cloud

BY ZAKARIYYA ADARAMOLA,

US Advises Librarians, Scientists On IT - AllAfrica.com

"The United States of America has advised scientists in library and information management sector in Nigeria to embrace cloud computing technology to make their work easier and attractive."


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