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Over 50s take Facebook training in Nottingham libraries

Over 50s take Facebook training in Nottingham libraries | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
A group of over 50s have become students of Facebook after taking part in a training session at Bilborough Library.

Six adults, all aged over 50, have signed up for a two part training course where...

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, March 15, 2013 4:32 AM

Training in social media at the library!

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Maker Librarian | Making the Future, One Library at a Time

Maker Librarian | Making the Future, One Library at a Time | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
RT @homeysimpson: new resource for librarians who want to learn about makers, hackerspaces, the participatory library and more: http://t.co/eQshWzOM

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Great resource for maker librarians!
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Better Together - The Potentials of Partnerships with Libraries

"Better Together is a short film about the potentials of partnerships between libraries and organisations, companies and users. The film introduces examples  from Roskilde and Aarhus. Read more about partnerships (in Danish) at www.bygpartnerskaber.dk "


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The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator

The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
How could it REALLY change libraries?“@libraryfuture: The iPad Mini’s meaning & impact on libraries http://t.co/sh54FFJN”...

 

"For Libraries:
With this smaller device, the reach of the Apple iOS and resources through it expands to more of our patrons (those preferring the smaller device size and smoother integration into their lives) and into more of their spaces. So be prepared for more iOS mobile engagement with your content and services.

For librarians’ use: the Mini may be better suited for mobile library staff: easier use with Square and mobile payments, more portable for roving reference, for checking out tablets to users."


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Phil Bradley's weblog: Libraries, books, ebooks and the future

Phil Bradley's weblog: Libraries, books, ebooks and the future | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
There's a text version and 2 videos totaling 24 minutes below. There’s a phrase that I use every now and then; “It’s like dancing on quick sand” and never was it more appropriate than right now in respect of the eBook arena.

 

"Let’s look at the latest news. A new low cost eBook reader has been unveiled by txtr, a German eBook retail platform...

 

Oyster, which is a new startup has raised $3 million in order to become the ‘Spotify of books’....

 

HarperCollins is launching a new global publishing system which will provide them with an infrastructure that allows them to maximise it’s catalogue of books, eBooks and apps...

 

The final news item that’s caught my eye, and I assume has also caught yours is that Amazon is going to launch their lending service in the UK by the end of the month..."

 

[...]

"We are at an absolutely pivotal point within both our profession, and within the library service in the UK. I recently talked to an ex-librarian who has since left the profession, and she said ‘I’m glad I got out, we’re finished’. That is so patently not the case it’s painful. This is a superb time to be a professional, or to have a love of libraries, of reading, books and knowledge. This is because we are going to be able to shape the development of all of those things into the future. What we do now is going to set a pattern for the next 50 or 100 years. We just need to believe in the power that the information professionals have, and the key role that libraries play in society. But – and this is a big but, we can only do it if we all work together, because it’s only by holding out our hands to one another in trust that we can help drag ourselves out of the quicksand, rather than push each other under faster."


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The library's future in a digital world - Saugerties Public Library's director Sukrit Goswani

The library's future in a digital world - Saugerties Public Library's director Sukrit Goswani | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

by SHARYN FLANAGAN:

"Interview with library director Sukrit Goswami. The subject? The future of libraries in an increasingly digital world:

[...]

"What are people interested in and what programs are they signing up for?

Up to now we’ve been letting the community tell us what they want, just putting the programs out there in front of them and letting them choose. The most popular are the health-related programs, particularly the yoga and fitness classes, and also the educational programs; people love those. Our own staff teaches the computer programs, and in the coming year we want to offer resume building workshops and classes for job seekers on how to write cover letters. I’ve taught these when I was at Glens Falls [library], and I love teaching classes, but can’t now due to time constraints.

We are constantly expanding our services and programs, and we do three to four teen programs a week now, too, that are all well attended. We have increased storytime for children, adding one session to Saturdays for parents who work on weekdays, and that’s been very successful."

 

Full interview here:: http://www.saugertiesx.com/2012/08/16/librarys-future-digital-world/


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The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed

The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Submitted by Patricia J Delois:

RT @sallyheroes: "It appears that the number one thing patrons use the library for is (prepare yourself) books": http://t.co/CEiQTtdC via @JustinLibrarian...

 

"[...] surprised they would select books when they have so many other things to choose from. I imagine he’s even more surprised to learn that something else patrons rate highly is personal interaction with the staff. I don’t know who designed the survey, but it couldn’t have been the director. It wouldn’t have occurred to him to put “human interaction” on the list of things patrons might value. He’s all about technology.

No one disputes that technology has improved the library experience for the patron. You can search the catalog from home and access our subscribed databases. You can place your own holds, request your own interlibrary loan materials, download books to your own devices.

The library is working towards self-checkout, presumably so you can conduct all your library business without ever having to interact with the staff. This must sound like a dream-come-true for the director, who hates to interact with the library staff, but for patrons, there’s more to the library than just the delivery of materials. They like human contact."


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Exploring new roles for libraries and mediating technologies in addressing the DIY mindset of library patrons > Slideshare

Presentation given at the American Library Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA. June 23, 2012.

 

by Bohyun Kim on Jun 20, 2012

"Presentation given at the American Library Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA. June 23, 2012.

Speaker: Bohyun Kim, Digital Access Librarian, Florida International University
Speaker: Jason Clark, Head of Digital Access and Web Services, Montana State University Libraries
Speaker: Patrick T. Colegrove, Head, DeLaMare Science & Engineering Library, University of Nevada, Reno"

More program details: http://ala12.scheduler.ala.org/m/node/806


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10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities

10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Staff Writers:

"In honor of School Library Month, check out the ways libraries are going to blossom in the coming years."

 

"[...] the almost uncanny ability to consistently adapt to the changing demands of the local populace and emerging technology alike. The library system probably won’t disappear anytime soon, but rather, see itself blossoming into something new and exciting in congruence with today’s myriad informational demands."

 

1. More technology

2. Sensory story times

3. Better outreach to ESOL and ESL adults & children

4. Automation

5. Emphasizing community space

6. More social media savvy

7. Digital media labs

8. Electronic outposts

9. Crowdsourcing

10. More active librarians


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New trend? Librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world | ArchivesNext

Kate T:

"New trend?Librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world | ArchivesNext http://t.co/eAGshlcC..."

 

"I’m referring to this almost ebullient post by the Library of Congress’ Butch Lazorchak on the Signal blog, “#sxswLAM: Libraries, Archives and Museums in an Interactive World.” It’s a beautiful vision, and it’s great to hear that participating in the South By Southwest Interactive Conference has given him this kind of warm rosy optimistic glow.

Butch’s post bolsters my claim that “blurring of organizational roles” is a significant trend for archives. In an earlier draft of my trends post I had a list of trends I wanted to see, and although I didn’t phrase it in quite the same way, “librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world” is pretty close. It’s my hope (and Butch’s vision) that LAM professionals can emerge as leaders in the evolving digital world. But this will only happen if more of them engage in wider discussions, as some LAM representatives are doing."

 

Kate T's version of Trendswatch 2012 - The Archive's edition: http://www.archivesnext.com/?p=2608

 


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Professionalism: on changing organizational structures by Kendra K. Levine - Three posts on organizational change in libraries | Gavia Libraria

Professionalism: on changing organizational structures by Kendra K. Levine - Three posts on organizational change in libraries | Gavia Libraria | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

RT @LisaJElmer: Had a quick read, interesting.. RT @niamhpage: Three fascinating posts on restructuring of libraries http://t.co/Zi0Drx4n (via @gavialib)

 

chronological order by post time:

Thinking about Organizations by Jason Griffey

http://jasongriffey.net/wp/2013/01/02/thinking-about-organizations/

 

 

Professionalism: on changing organizational structures by Kendra K. Levine

http://libraryattack.com/?p=405

 

 

Professionalism, organizational structures, and the fog of war by Jenica Rogers

http://www.attemptingelegance.com/blog/2013/01/02/professionalism-organizational-structures-and-the-fog-of-war/

 

 

 


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, January 3, 2013 3:56 AM

Some positive insights about restructuring at libraries!

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MOOCs and Librarians - Emerging Technologies - "Massive Open Online Courses"

MOOCs and Librarians - Emerging Technologies - "Massive Open Online Courses" | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

By Nancy Bellafante:

The Chronicle’s recent article on plagiarism accusations in Coursera courses kicked off my exploration into MOOCs and the role librarians can play. A recent RUSA post on Chasing Reference points to the lack of research assignments in MOOCs and the need for embedded librarians. Even though students enrolled in a MOOC do not typically have access to the parent institution’s fee-based library resources, information literacy and research skills can still be taught and are an important component in courses that ask students to explore complex issues and social problems. Simply providing students with a reading list is not going to teach them to be savvy information consumers who can effectively find authoritative information and critically evaluate sources. So, what’s our first step?

Librarians should  join a  MOOC.

 

Read more: http://www.library.drexel.edu/blogs/technologies/tag/edx/

 

 


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, December 24, 2012 4:37 AM

Free online classes the future of education > with a direct impact on librarians!

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How to kill a library, By Kitty Pope

How to kill a library, By Kitty Pope | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"[...]there are more than a few ways to kill a library.

For example:

√ Stop believing in the libraries mission. Do we really believe in the freedom to read, learn and discover?

√ Spend less time with the board. The ideal public library board would meet 4 times per year and agrees with everything the CEO recommended.

√ Stop talking to your customers. What do they know any way? And on the same topic, stop consulting staff. It is a huge time waster.

√ Don’t worry about the future and how you will get there. Sustainability is not an issue with which libraries need to be concerned. After all, we’ve have survived for hundreds of years.

√ Stop telling the library story. Everyone has heard our story.

√ Accept that the library building is old and you don’t need to keep renovating, painting, and updating it. It is what it is.

√ Accept that just like instant coffee killed the coffee bean, the e-book will kill the printed book.

√ Stop promoting the product; everyone knows about literacy and lifelong learning.

√ Stop empowering staff, and stop training them. They should come to us fully trained.

√ Stop all this talk about innovation. It just makes for more work.

√ And, for heaven’s sake, stop changing the rules and our traditions. It’s annoying!"


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Internet Librarians—The Power to Transform Libraries

by Cindy Shamel :

"The 16th annual Internet Librarian conference recently concluded in Monterey, Calif. More than a thousand registrants and 215 speakers tackled the topic Transformational Power of Internet Librarians. While the sessions ranged from accessibility of digital content to web analytics, two themes took center stage: the future role of libraries and the reality of ebooks. As it turns out, some would assert that the future role of libraries depends upon the ultimate impact of ebooks.
Role of Libraries

Depending upon whom you ask, libraries should serve as a platform for networking, return to their core competency as the keeper of print books, or launch new products and services as the enabler of content creation.

In the opening keynote address, David Weinberger advocated for the library as a platform for people, ideas, and works delivered through tools and services. Weinberger is senior researcher, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, co-director, Harvard Innovation Lab, and author of Too Big to Know. He says, rather than attempting to collect knowledge in the form of published works, librarians can advance knowledge through public learning, generous sharing, and the power of iteration. Weinberger used the experience of software developers as an example of fast, efficient, and effective learning as they collaborate through tutorials, versioning, and social connections to tweak and improve programs. He posited that libraries can serve as a networking platform that “provides the resources that let others create and flourish.”


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The bookless library – Is that the future of libraries? | ePublish a Book

The bookless library – Is that the future of libraries? | ePublish a Book | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"The bookless library is increasing a reality, staring in places meant to be the repository of knowledge, university libraries, and gaining ground outside academic grounds.
The New York Public Library is implementing its plan to move many of its books away from its main branch into offsite storage with 24-hour advance request required. Yet it is not the first library to do so. Opening the move was Kansas State University’s engineering school, which went bookless 12 years ago. The University of Texas at San Antonio ditched print for e-books and e-journals in 2010. Stanford University’s engineering school pruned 85 percent of its books last year. Drexel University opened a new library just last month with hardly a single print book – just rows and rows of computers. And Cornell recently announced a similar initiative." 

 

Read more: http://www.epublishabook.com/2012/08/31/the-bookless-library-is-that-the-future-of-libraries/#ixzz257b6gIeO


Under Creative Commons License: Attribution No Derivatives


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Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012 by Colleen Egget

We are talking about reference and how it is changing in UPLIFT this week: August 15 at the Utah State Library & August 17 2012 in Ephraim, at the Karen A. Hunstman Library on the Snow College campus.

 

Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012:

 

- Traditional reference work is less relevant to the needs of users
- Rather than worrying about reference’s demise, many librarians have been energized by their newly expanded roles
- Reconfigured or eliminated reference desks
- Consolidated desks and services
- Librarian and support staff work together on the one main desk
- Librarian can handle more complicated questions
- Increased training for support staff to handle basic reference questions
- The reference interview is as pertinent as ever
- Roving reference is more important—getting out to where people are
- Expansion of self-service options (self-checkout, online group study room reservations, self-service holds, and touch screen frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) on your website/ library catalog
- Reconfiguring online reference resources for smartphones and other mobile devices
- Librarians are exploring new roles in reaching out to meet information needs
- Reference through the stacks and other indirect means
- Reduction/elimination of print reference collections
- Greater marketing and promotion of online resources and services
- Librarians will spend less time staffing desks and more time outside of library walls
- Online reference: email, chat, Instant Messaging, and SMS (short messaging services) reaches users who may not visit the library
- Online reference requires continual marketing to be successful
- Collaborating with other organizations will do as much to keep libraries alive as any project or program
- Embedded librarianship: becoming an integral part. Getting close to users by getting out into the community; being actively present with the user at the point of need.
- The big shift: we’re not doing things “for” the community, but we’re being a part “of” the community
- Libraries are shifting from the physical to the virtual facilities and media; from an individual to a community focus; from being a collection library to being a creation library; from being an archive to being a portal


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Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms

Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

Carl Grant:

"At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, I gave the keynote talk at the NISO Update Session. My goal was to give attendees some thoughts about how important it is that they participate actively in the shaping of the new cloud-computing platforms which are are emerging from a number of organizations, including OCLC, Ex Libris, Serials Solution, Innovative and Kuali. I stated that the main reason for our participation as librarians is simply this: So we can ensure the value of librarianship is contained within and amplified by these new technological foundations.

 

There were three key points I talked about us doing in order to accomplish this. They were:

1. The mission and value of librarianship have to be embedded in the software you’re using.

2. Defining our future is a task of participation, NOT representation.

3. For our services to have value they must offer differentiation."


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Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes

Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

R David Lankes:

A librarian plays devil's advocate for those who argue libraries are obsolete (but there is a happy ending).

 

"There are few of us who can know the exact moment their career ended. However when a professor of library science argues libraries are obsolete against a Harvard law school professor and the head of the lead funding agency in the field I think that moment has arrived. This was where I found myself April 18th when I took part in an Oxford-style debate as part of Harvard Library Strategic Conversations. The idea was to mix humor with serious debate on the proposition that “Libraries are Obsolete.” I was asked to argue for the proposition.Now this is a rather odd position to be in since I have spent my career arguing exactly the opposite, but in the spirit of playing devil’s advocate, and the fact that I have tenure, I jumped in. After all, if we don’t honestly debate the point, how can we truly be sure we are not headed towards obsolescence [more on my rational see this post]."

http://quartz.syr.edu/blog/?p=1557

 


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Steve Rose | Even in this digital age, our libraries are crucial

Steve Rose | Even in this digital age, our libraries are crucial | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it
With recent budget cuts leading to fewer hours at many Johnson County libraries, declining service, fewer books in the collection, cuts in building and equipment maintenance, as well as programming, what are we doing to our community treasure?

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Future of Libraries via the Knight Foundation - 10 video interviews

Future of Libraries via the Knight Foundation - 10 video interviews | The Information Specialist's Scoop | Scoop.it

"During a Knight conference exploring the role of libraries in the digital world, we interviewed library directors from eight communities - Philadelphia, St. Paul, Macon, Charlotte, Miami, Akron, San Jose and Detroit - to ask these questions and more.

Hear what library directors from these communities say are their biggest successes and listen to insights in how they’re addressing challenges.

In these videos, library directors also share what projects they’ve developed to help better serve their communities. The Free Library of Philadelphia, for example, was able to involve itself more deeply in communities by creating hot spots in areas with limited digital access."

 

Interviews with:

James Crawford, Google Books
Siobhan A. Reardon, Philadelphia
Kit Hadley, Saint Paul
Thomas Jones, Macon
Karen Beach, Charlotte
Raymond Santiago, Miami
David Jennings, Akron
Jane Light, San Jose
Doug Dotterer, Stow-Munroe
Juliet Machie, Detroit


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