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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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The 1-2-3 Method for Building-Up Your Online Presence - Kiersten Bryant

The 1-2-3 Method for Building-Up Your Online Presence - Kiersten Bryant | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
by Kiersten Bryant, former Head Editor, INALJ California previously published 7/2/13

"The 1-2-3 Method works like this: for every 1 post you make on Facebook, Instagram, etc., you should comment on 2 posts, and like (or favorite) 3 additional posts made by other users. Make sure the comments that you leave have some substance. They should be meaningful and engaging. The easiest way to do this is to ask a question in response to a post: encouraging further dialog and interaction."


Via Trudy Raymakers
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great advice!

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Link to the Recording of - Trends, Tools, and Tactics for Better Library Design - A Blended Librarian Webcast

Link to the Recording of - Trends, Tools, and Tactics for Better Library Design - A Blended Librarian Webcast | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Elliot Felix of brightspot Strategy, a library design expert, shares his perspectives on the latest trends, tools, and tactics. As the founder and director of brightspot, Elliot has played a major role in the design of the new Hunt Library at North Carolina State University. He also co-conceived and participated in the development of the Learning Space Toolkit. In this webinar, Elliot provided an overview of trends impacting the design and operation of library spaces as well as the services offered within them. He’ll also introduce some tools you can use along with advice on how you can put them into practice.


Via John Shank
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Library architecture - spaces/places!

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Job Hunting Techniques for Public Librarians, by @libralante

Job Hunting Techniques for Public Librarians, by @libralante | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Here I will present an overview of my job hunting processes and wisdom in the hope that my experience can be adapted to the processes of other public library job-hunters for greater success."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great tips for any job hunting librarian!

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Finding Hidden Treasure: a Cache of Librarian Blogs

Finding Hidden Treasure: a Cache of Librarian Blogs | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
by Sarah Deringer, Head Editor, INALJ Mississippi Finding Hidden Treasure: a Cache of Librarian Blogs Every great once in awhile I find a collection of good blogs to follow, and this week I found four...
Karen du Toit's insight:
Four good librarian blogs to follow!
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Library receives special distinction for youth programs & Tools for Teachers - Daily Comet

Mary Cosper Leboeuf:

The Terrebonne Parish Library System is one of 16 finalists for the Institute for Museum and Library Service's National Medal, one of the nation's highest honors conferred on libraries for service to...

 

The programmes that made the award possible:

1. Future Leaders of America's Gulf, or FLAG, is an innovative program for teens that the Library System helped implement. The nonprofit organization is a leadership and environmental group for teenagers who advocate and educate for the future of Louisiana's coast and address issues facing the state.

2. “Tools for Teachers,” a series of workshops developed by the Library System's reference staff to help teachers meet their grade-level expectations for their classrooms. The workshops present to teachers what the Library System has to offer to help in the classroom.

3. LEGO robotics

4. Touch-a-Truck

5. Book sale

6. Adult classes

7. VITA - free tax preparation services

8. Library App

9. Digital Magazines made available to patrons

10. e-readers

11. 24 hour access

Karen du Toit's insight:

This is what everybody should come to expect from their public library!

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Digital Curation & Sweet Scoopage | The Daring Librarian

Digital Curation & Sweet Scoopage | The Daring Librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Educon Curation Slideshare here: http://www.slideshare.net/joycevalenza/curationeducon

 

Resources for curation also included.


Via GwynethJones
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Insights and tips by Gwyneth Jones about digital curation

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GwynethJones's curator insight, February 10, 2013 8:50 PM

My latest post - Featuring a FREE Upgrade to 10 topics by Scoopit this month only!

Ellen Robinette's curator insight, February 14, 2013 10:07 AM

Guide to effective scoop.it use for librarians

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Key Traits of a Good Content Curation Strategy by Heidi Cohen

Key Traits of a Good Content Curation Strategy by Heidi Cohen | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Robin Good: What are the key traits of a good content curator? What are the main characteristics of a good content curation strategy?

Heidi Cohen does a good job of outlining 12 key characterizing traits of any good content curation effort. This is great advice for anyone  just starting out with curation and for anyone having reasonable doubts about the correct approach to take.



Good, sound-advice, for who is starting out with curation. 7/10


Full article: http://heidicohen.com/12-attributes-of-a-content-curation-strategy/


P.S.: My selection of traits for what makes a great curator are here:  http://www.masternewmedia.org/what-makes-a-great-curator-great/




Via Robin Good
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good points:

"

Has defined, measurable goals.Targets a specific audience. Contains red meat content, not filler. Follows “the less is more” theory. Incorporates original content. UAdds real value. Has a human touch. Provides branded context for your information. IInvolves a community. Offers information in small chunks. Sticks to a schedule. Credits its creator."
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Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, December 3, 2012 9:25 AM
interesting! :-)))
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The 10 golden rules of Twitter

The 10 golden rules of Twitter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

David Aaronovitch


No week seems to pass without some tweeter or other having their handle felt by officers of the law. (10 golden rules follow).

 

And not a bad bit of advice amongst them. DW

 

>> Good reminder! (KdT)

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How To Start Curating Content: Tips and Tools Advice from Amy Schmittauer

Robin Good: "Amy Schmittauer has some good basic tips if you are new to content curation and are curious to know which tools you could use to get your feet wet.

 

In this yet undiscovered three-minute video from this past summer, Amy introduces and explains the pros and cons of using Paper.li, Storify and Google Alerts."

 

Useful for beginners. Informative. 7/10

 

Original video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iSRd8mK5KI&feature=colike


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7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter

7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

"The advice is from 1962 study and has been updated for today's daily battle with digital overload.   The techniques are very much still valid.

 

 

1. Omission – The concept is simple: you can’t consume everything, so just ignore some. This is a bit dangerous since some of the omitted information might be the most critical. Imagine that the email you ignored was the one where your most important client alerts you to a new opportunity.

 

2. Error – Respond to information without giving due consideration. While a seemingly poor strategy, this is more common than you might think; I mean, who hasn’t reacted to an email, report, or telephone call without thinking through all the consequences because of time constraints or lack of attention?

 

 

3. Queuing – Putting information aside until there is time catch up later. An example is processing email early in the morning, before the business day begins, or reading important reports late at night.

 

 

4. Filtering – This is similar to omission except filtering employs a priority scheme for processing some information while ignoring others. Automated tools are particularly well suited to help filter information. Recommendation engines, search tools, email Inbox rule engines and Tivo are all good examples of tools that can help filter and prioritize information.

 

5. Employing multiple/parallel channels – Doling out information processing tasks; for example, assigning the tracking of Twitter feeds to one person and blog coverage to another person on your team.

 

6. Approximation – Processing information with limited precision. Skimming is an example of approximation. Like omission and error, you can process more information by approximating, but you run the risk of making critical mistakes

 

7. Escaping from the task – Making this someone else’s problem. While it sounds irresponsible, admitting you can’t ‘do it all’ and giving an assignment to someone else is sometimes the best strategy of all."

 

 

 

 

 


Via Beth Kanter
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Robin Martin's comment, November 4, 2012 11:12 AM
Great info...thanks for "scooping" Deb!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 4, 2012 4:51 PM
You are welcome Robin. There's definitely some good interest in this topic!
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Practical Tips For Online Privacy | LISNews - from a librarian's perspective

Blake:

"Staying Safe Online" that will cover a million and one tips on how to keep you and your computer safe.

Privacy is a relative term. That is, the things that I consider important to my privacy, someone else might not care about. As librarians we usually key in on Confidentiality Threats. We want our patrons records safe. We also don't share that information with ANYONE else. In general, we are fierce about protecting our patrons’ privacy. This is something that has always set us apart from everyone else. Amazon won't do it. Google won't do it. Do I even need to say Facebook won't do it? People who come into the library or use our web sites don't worry about what's going to happen with their information (or at least they shouldn't need worry about it). They should know we are doing our best to guard their privacy. Keeping all our IT resources secure should be a large part of guarding that privacy."

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8 Ideas, 10 Guides, And 17 Tools For A Better Professional Learning Network

8 Ideas, 10 Guides, And 17 Tools For A Better Professional Learning Network | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Personal learning networks are a great way for educators to get connected with learning opportunities, access professional development resources, and to build camaraderie with other education professionals. Although PLNs have been around for years, in recent years social media has made it possible for these networks to grow exponentially. Now, it’s possible to expand and connect your network around the world anytime, anywhere. But how exactly do you go about doing that? Check out our guide to growing your personal learning network with social media, full of more than 30 different tips, ideas, useful resources, and social media tools that can make it all possible."

 

Tips & Ideas

Guides

Tools & Resources

 

Extremely valuable for Information Professionals as well!


Via Joyce Valenza
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Petra Pollum's comment, October 1, 2012 7:41 AM
Thanks for sharing
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Going Green @ your library - blog

Going Green @ your library - blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Environmentally friendly practices for libraries and beyond!

 

"Going green for libraries has never been more easy! Check out this blog, and get some great tips on how to incorporate some easy, environmentally friendly tips into your workday experience"  http://greeningyourlibrary.wordpress.com/

 

"This blog lists ideas, practices, tools, and techniques to help green libraries, librarians, and the communities they serve – possibly saving money or even raising money too. So here’s to a greener library and a sustainable future for all."


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa, Afroditi Fragkou, University of Nicosia Library
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7 Qualities of Highly Effective Content Curators - Dennis Shiao

7 Qualities of Highly Effective Content Curators - Dennis Shiao | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Excerpt from article written by Dennis Shiao and published on Scoop.it Blog:
"Every time I visit the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City, I see something I’ve never seen before.
Wouldn’t it be great if our content collections drew as much interest, respect and admiration as the collections at MoMA? In order to achieve this feat, we need to become highly effective content curators.
Let’s consider seven habits:


1. Focus on Goals

What are your goals around content curation? If you can’t answer that question, stop right now. Stop reading this post, too. Go answer the question, then return when you’re done.


2. Have Empathy

You’ll need to have empathy for your target audience. In other words, the better you understand their thoughts, interests and challenges, the more effective you’ll be at content curation.

3. Be Careful, Cautious and Selective
Make sure you read (and digest) every piece of content you curate. Curate high quality content only, leaving the marginal pieces to the proverbial cutting room floor.

4. Editorialize
Don’t just share content, tell us why you like (or dislike) the piece. What can your target audience learn from reading it and what are the key takeaways? In a sense, editorializing creates a nice blend of creation and curation.

5. Provide Attribution
Providing attribution shows respect and helps drive visibility and awareness to content authors. As you curate, look up the author of the article (or blog post) and explicitly acknowledge them.

6. Understand What’s Timely and Trending
Sharing fresh milk is good. Sharing spoiled milk is rotten.
If you find content that is time sensitive, consider whether the “sharing window” has already passed.

7. Have an Eye for a Great Title
Not everyone will be as thorough as you when reviewing content. A lot of people will click on a link solely because of a compelling title. As you sharpen your curating skills, you’ll begin to figure out what separates great titles from good titles. If you come across a great article that has just a good title, consider changing the title text when you curate..."

Read full original article here:
http://blog.scoop.it/2014/02/13/7-qualities-of-highly-effective-content-curators/


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
Karen du Toit's insight:

Definitely points to consider when curating! 

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Randi Thompson's curator insight, February 18, 2014 7:16 PM

The content you share (the articles or what ever) is how you attract the people who are interested in what you have to offer.  What do you need to do to get their attention?

Therese Torris's curator insight, February 19, 2014 4:29 AM

There are 100s of very similar lists of basic advice. I scoop one every now and then because, at the end of the day, it's the basic priorities that cost us most when we  fail to meet them. Thus, this is good advice for beginners as well as other content curators

eProAgi Anderson's curator insight, April 28, 2014 8:50 AM

Scoop.It is ideal for curating on specific topics! I enjoy sharing on a variety of subjects ~ invite you to follow me!

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QR codes - Pinterest Board created for libraries and librarians by 23 Mobile Things

QR codes - Pinterest Board created for libraries and librarians by 23 Mobile Things | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"QR Codes ("Quick Reference" Codes) are essentially 2-dimensional barcodes. They can contain hundreds of times more data than conventional 1-dimensional barcodes. Initially created for use in the shipping industry, they are gaining popularity for marketing to people with smart-phones." Source: Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource for QR codes!

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Free Web 2.0 Tools for Libraries

Free Technology and Web 2.0Tools for Your Library Teresa S. Welsh, Ph.D. teresa.welsh@usm.edu Stacy Creel, Ph.D.
Karen du Toit's insight:

Slideshare of free Web 2.0 tools for the library! Great resource!

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Just-for-Me Training by Screencasting - American Libraries

Just-for-Me Training by Screencasting - American Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Meredith Farkas:
Librarians in all types of libraries provide training and instruction. Whether it's for staff or patrons, the timing of the training is usually critical.

 

"Even when we get the timing right, infrequent use of a tool on which people were trained will lead to forgetting. [...]

Screencasting software, technology that creates a video of activity on the computer screen along with the user’s narration, is sometimes used to solve this problem. The software allows a trainer to create videos that show specific processes within a web system so that users who have gone through a training can refresh their memory with a video later on."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The use of screencasting software such as Jing to enhance to learning process in libraries.

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Hot Topic at Midwinter: Library Maker Spaces, Ideas for Cheap, Hands-On Fun - The Digital Shift

Hot Topic at Midwinter: Library Maker Spaces, Ideas for Cheap, Hands-On Fun - The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Put to a vote among unconference participants, “Creative Spaces” won out as the topic of choice (beating by a wide margin digital relevancy, advocacy, and budgeting).

Attendees shared ideas, with an emphasis on low-cost, practical ways to implement “Maker” activities in the library.  Much of the conversation urged partnering with other organizations, including:

Reddit subcommunities. Local groups have formed around social news site Reddit. Consider hosting an event at your library. Or how about Ikea Hackers? Your local college or university. Don’t have native expertise among your library staff? Consider reaching out to a technical college or student organization to help lead programming.Area crafters. The Greenpoint branch of the Brooklyn Public