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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Libraries get into technology exploration - BurlingtonFreePress.com

Libraries get into technology exploration - BurlingtonFreePress.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A maker is a trending term referring to a producer of technology-based works such as electronics or robotics. A maker space is where people have an opportunity to explore interests, learn to use tools and materials and develop creative projects.

[...]

Libraries statewide have been offering a variety of science and technology based programming through the summertime reading theme Fizz, Boom, Read. A $20,000 Vermont Community Foundation Innovations and Collaborations Grant, and a $5,000 grant from University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences are helping to fund the programs.

The Williston workshop is part of the "Vermont Makers and Libraries: Sparking a Culture of Innovation" project, a collaborative between the Vermont Department of Libraries, Vermont Makers, the University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, Vermont Library Association and CMF Innovations."

Karen du Toit's insight:

A great but exciting challenge to librarians to stay ahead!

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Loss of Librarians Devastating to Science and Knowledge in Canada - Erika Thorkelson

Loss of Librarians Devastating to Science and Knowledge in Canada - Erika Thorkelson | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"It has been a difficult few years for the curators of knowledge in Canada. While the scientific community is still reeling from the loss of seven of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans' eleven libraries, news has broken that scientists with Health Canada were left scrambling for resources after the outsourcing and then closure of their main library.

In January CBC news uncovered a report from a consultant hired by the federal government cataloguing mistakes in the government’s handling of the closure. "Staff requests have dropped 90 per cent over in-house service levels prior to the outsource. This statistic has been heralded as a cost savings by senior HC [Health Canada] management," the report said.

"However, HC scientists have repeatedly said during the interview process that the decrease is because the information has become inaccessible — either it cannot arrive in due time, or it is unaffordable due to the fee structure in place."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Horrified to hear about the situation!

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New Research Tools Kick Up Dust in Archives

New Research Tools Kick Up Dust in Archives | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Advances in technology have transformed the methods of historians and other archival researchers, a change that carries both benefits and consequences.

 

In just a few years, advances in technology have transformed the methods of historians and other archival researchers. Productivity has improved dramatically, costs have dropped and a world distinguished by solo practitioners has become collaborative. In response, developers are producing an array of computerized methods of analysis, creating a new quantitative science.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Technology greatly enhances research in archives, but also bring new challenges 

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From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge

From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China. (...) - by Adrian Giordani, MyScienceWork blog, 27 november 2012


Via Julien Hering, PhD, Pavlinka Kovatcheva
Karen du Toit's insight:

"Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China.

This article was originally published in International Science Grid This Week as “Enabling knowledge creation in data-driven science”
http://www.isgtw.org/feature/enabling-knowledge-creation-data-driven-science

[...]

 

"To answer this problem [of data deluge], some are creating infrastructures and software that are set to radically transform the way scientific publishing is done, which has been little changed for centuries.

Research publishing 2.0

While a number of scientific institutes, European Commission-funded projects, and research communities work on establishing common data policies and open-access infrastructures to make research data more searchable, shareable, and citable, the life sciences are looking at data analysis and publishing approaches that move the computer to the data rather than moving the data to the computers"

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The Impact of Open Access and Social Media on Scientific Research | Journal of Participatory Medicine | Online Networked Learning

The Impact of Open Access and Social Media on Scientific Research | Journal of Participatory Medicine | Online Networked Learning | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

K. Thomas Pickard:

"Traditionally, research papers undergo peer review before publication. Two trends, open access and social media, are changing the peer review process.

E-patients must be aware that traditional peer review applies different criteria and methods than review through social media outlets. Although still developing, these review processes may affect the evaluation of research quality."


Via HaBIc, Guus van den Brekel
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A day in the life of a science librarian - Bonnie Swoger, Scientific American (blog)

A day in the life of a science librarian - Bonnie Swoger, Scientific American (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

A day in the life of a science librarian
Bonnie Swoger Bonnie J. M. Swoger is a Science and Technology Librarian at a small public undergraduate institution in upstate New York, SUNY Geneseo.

Karen du Toit's insight:

A day in the life of an academic /specialist librarian! Interesting!

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Examining The Future Role Of Libraries at #LIBER2013 | LIBER

by Friedel Grant “A university is just a group of buildings gathered around a library.”

– Shelby Foote

 

With this quotation, Dr. Professor Peter Strohschneider, Chairman of the German Council of Science and Humanities, began his keynote speech at LIBER’s 42nd annual conference in Munich, Germany.

 

“The library is a place in which learning and research happens, and in which knowledge orders are created,” continued Strohschneider. “As Foote suggests, the library lies at the very heart of the academic experience. A university without a library is more or less unthinkable. This being the case, Foote’s perspective raises some important questions when we consider the future of academic libraries.”

 

Strohschneider went on to explain how some of the most notable research discoveries can be attributed to serendipity. These accidental revelations can, however, be thwarted by the current enthusiasm for modern search engines which only lead researchers to targeted results.

 

From this opening talk, the future of libraries was repeatedly explored over the three days of the conference – particularly in relation to the vast quantities of data currently being created and the library’s role in helping researchers to manage and sift through that data.

 

With two new scholarly articles being published every minute, Dr. Jan Velterop asserted that structures such as nano-publications would become an essential tool for researchers to identify relevant material. This would, in turn, require libraries and publishers to adjust to a new world where the scientific journal was valued more as a source of raw material, in which researchers could look for knowledge patterns, than something to read.

 

4 Slideshares from the Conf:

1. 

The future of the science publishing ego-system http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/liber-munich-26june2013-2

2. 

Roadmaps, Roles and Re-engineering: Developing Data Informatics Capability in Libraries

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/roadmaps-roles-and-reengineering-developing-data-informatics-capability-in-libraries

 

3. 

A Revolution in Open Science: Open Data and the Role of Libraries (Professor Geoffrey Boulton at LIBER 2013

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/boulton-gsb-presentationlibermunich

 

4. 

Enabling Data-Intensive Science Through Data Infrastructures

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/morais-liber42-datainfrastructures-1

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future role of libraries! 

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Libraries offer weird things to draw new borrowers - USA TODAY

Libraries offer weird things to draw new borrowers - USA TODAY | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Greg Toppo, USA TODAY:

In Ann Arbor, Mich., the library circulates three kinds of energy meters that patrons can take home to test how much juice their appliances use. On a recent Monday, 27 of the library's 30 meters were checked out with the 28th on hold, said Celeste Choate, associate director for services, collections and access.

Later this year they plan to begin circulating science equipment — oscilloscopes, microscopes and perhaps even a few life-size models of the human skeleton — so students can shine at science fairs. "Sometimes you need tools in order to do cool science projects," Choate said. "Not everybody can afford a pH meter."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Weird things that can be borrowed at a library!

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The Busy Librarian's Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering

The Busy Librarian's Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"CRL announces the publication of The Busy Librarian’s Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering, edited by Katherine O’Clair and Jeanne Davidson.

The Busy Librarian’s Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering provides a practical guide for librarians responsible for science, engineering and/or technology information literacy instruction to understand and apply the ACRL Information Literacy Standards for Science and Engineering/Technology into curriculum design and ongoing instruction. Edited by science and engineering librarians Katherine O’Clair and Jeanne Davidson, the book highlights unique needs and challenges for information literacy instruction within science/engineering curricula."

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Elephant in the Room: Infrastructure and the Digital Divide | Library Adventures.com #scio12

Elephant in the Room: Infrastructure and the Digital Divide | Library Adventures.com #scio12 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @KiyomiD: #scio12 Pt2: Elephant in the Room: Infrastructure and the Digital Divide http://t.co/CGaFRH4V #tech #science #librarians #education...

 

Kiyomi:

 

"A recurring theme in the sessions I attended at #scio12, and some after hours discussions, was technological infrastructure, and the need to remember that there is a huge digital divide between the haves and the have nots. It’s a problem you expect in developing nations (who we should be communicating with too, not ignoring), but you don’t expect that sort of problem in a country like the United States.

Sadly technological inequality is a huge problem in the United States. In Philadelphia, one of our major metropolitan areas, 40% of the households do not have internet access, in some neighborhoods only about 10% of households have Internet access. That’s at least 230,000 households in without access to the Internet in one city."

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