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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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5 Things That People Don’t Realize their Librarians Do - Rebecca Tischler

5 Things That People Don’t Realize their Librarians Do - Rebecca Tischler | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Rebecca Tischler, Head Editor, INALJ Tennessee 

"...

here are five things that you may have been unaware that librarians do (just a few of their caps), or that libraries offer.

1. Librarians are teachers. 

2. Librarians are tech savvy.

3. Librarians are advertisers.

4. Librarians are event planners.

5. Librarians are researchers.

 

[...]

With just those 5 things, librarians have to learn graphic design, communications, how to interview, public relations, writing, computer literacy and information literacy.

Karen du Toit's insight:

5 of the MANY caps that librarians wear

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International Open Access Week 2013 - 21-27 Oct #OA - suggestions on what to do

International Open Access Week 2013 - 21-27 Oct #OA - suggestions on what to do | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"The 6th Open Access Week is next week. "The week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. “Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole. Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward." - Open Access Week
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Suggestions of things to do for librarians!
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New Report From OCLC Research: “Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users” | LJ INFOdocket

New Report From OCLC Research: “Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users” | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users details findings from a survey of users of archives to learn more about how researchers find out about systems like ArchiveGrid, and the role that social media, recommendations, reviews, and other forms of user-contributed annotation play in archival research. oclc Research logo New Report From OCLC Research: Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive UsersWritten by OCLC Research Consulting Software Architect Bruce Washburn, Research Assistant Ellen Eckert, and Senior Program Officer Merrilee Proffitt, this report will be of interest to those working with archival discovery services, or those investigating the utility of social media in discovery environments. Key Findings E-mail and word of mouth continue to be the primary ways archival researchers share information about the resources they discover. Features such as tags, reviews, recommendations and user comments are viewed as useful by fewer than half of those responding. However, researchers value recommendations given by librarians and archivists. One-quarter of all survey respondents identified themselves as “unaffiliated scholars,” representing a significant number of those interested in making use of archival material. Full text report: http://www.oclc.org/content/dam/research/publications/library/2013/2013-06.pdf
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Survey of users of archives and the role of social media!
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New Research Tools Kick Up Dust in Archives

New Research Tools Kick Up Dust in Archives | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Advances in technology have transformed the methods of historians and other archival researchers, a change that carries both benefits and consequences.

 

In just a few years, advances in technology have transformed the methods of historians and other archival researchers. Productivity has improved dramatically, costs have dropped and a world distinguished by solo practitioners has become collaborative. In response, developers are producing an array of computerized methods of analysis, creating a new quantitative science.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Technology greatly enhances research in archives, but also bring new challenges 

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Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences

Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Many librarians are still unwilling to fully embrace Google Scholar as a resource. Michelle C. Hamilton, Margaret M. Janz and Alexandra Hauser investigate whether Google Scholar has the accuracy, authority and currency to be trustworthy enough for scholars."


Via University of Nicosia Library
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Keeping and Deleting Patron Records in Law Libraries » VoxPopuLII

Keeping and Deleting Patron Records in Law Libraries » VoxPopuLII | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Benjamin Keele:

"As researchers use materials in libraries, their actions tend to generate records—research trails in digital databases, lists of borrowed books, and correspondence with librarians. Most of the time, these records are innocuous, but to facilitate freedom of inquiry, librarians generally hold these records as confidential. This confidentiality is especially important in law libraries because legal matters can be very sensitive and stressful. Researchers implicitly trust librarians with at least hints of concerns the researchers would prefer not be generally known. If researchers knew any records of their questions could become known to others, some researchers would avoid using library collections or asking librarians for advice, guidance that very well may help them find valuable information.

In her interesting post, Meg Leta points out that, despite some exhortations that information on Web lasts forever, most information now online will disappear at some point. Websites go down when their owners fail to pay hosting fees. Data is deleted, either by purpose or mistake. A file sitting on a drive or disc will, without maintenance, eventually becomes inaccessible because the storage media has decayed or because the hardware and software needed to read the file has become obsolete. Since information will tend to vanish without action on our part, Leta suggests we should instead focus on actively saving information that is worth keeping.

Leta makes an excellent point, but I’d suggest that in addition to thinking carefully about what information needs to be kept, legal professionals also should consider whether certain types of information warrant purposeful destruction. I’d also suggest that for law libraries, patrons should be given the ability to retain, either through the library or themselves, records of their use of library resources."

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Can’t tweet or won’t tweet? What are the reasons behind low adoption of web 2.0 tools by researchers? | Impact of Social Sciences

Can’t tweet or won’t tweet? What are the reasons behind low adoption of web 2.0 tools by researchers? | Impact of Social Sciences | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Cheryl Brown:

 

"So why aren’t researchers using web 2.0 tools more? Broadly speaking, the reasons fall under three categories: researchers don’t know that the tools exist, researchers are unable to use them, or researchers choose not to use them. In this last category, the reluctance can spring from:

- lack of time to try new tools and lack of institutional incentives to make time to use them;

- their value not being made clear or the tools not being seen as credible;

- concerns around sharing ideas and data online;

 

For researchers in developing countries there are also serious legal, cultural, technological, and language barriers to adopting web 2.0 tools for collaboration and knowledge-sharing."

 


Via Dailin Shaido
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How #librarians can help researchers navigate open access choices #webinar #OA

How #librarians can help researchers navigate open access choices #webinar #OA | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Webinar: 

Open-access publishing has grown dramatically in the last five years. There have been many positive initiatives to help researchers communicate and access information in a sustainable way. However, as with many paradigm shifts, there are growing pains associated, including predatory journal practices and lack of clarity around terms and options.

In anticipation of Open Access Week October 21 to 27, Elsevier's Library Connect program is hosting a free webinar: "How librarians can help researchers navigate open access choices." In this live event, a surgeon/scholar, publisher and librarian will equip librarians and authors with the terminology, models and best practices of open access publishing and journal choices in general.

What metrics and standards should librarians and authors consider in determining in which journals to submit? Does the journal have an ethical publishing statement? How can you find journals that best fit the audience and research? What tools are out there to assist?

 
Karen du Toit's insight:

Terminology, models and best practices for open access publishing!

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Free webinar on Sept. 12: How librarians are raising researchers' reputations

Free webinar on Sept. 12: How librarians are raising researchers' reputations | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Register for the free Library Connect webinar on Sept. 12 - How librarians are raising researchers' reputations: An exploration of academic networks, profiles and analysis. Presenters include Chris Erdmann, Heather Chisholm and Wouter Gerritsma.

 

"With the continued extension of the academic research enterprise - both locally and globally - librarians are being asked to support researchers and the research organization with new services.

Learn how 3 librarians from leading institutions are implementing data, tools and strategies to advance their researchers and strengthen their organizations' research mission during a free Library Connect webinar."

- See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/supporting-users-organizations/2013-08/free-webinar-sept-12-how-librarians-are-raising#sthash.5ziKKURG.EMalh7Q1.dpuf

 

"Topics:

• Establishing researchers' identity and authority
• Sharing and collaborating remotely
• Collecting, annotating and storing bibliographies
• Developing international visibility
• Applying academic networks and profiles, such as Mendeley, ORCID and Scopus
- See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/supporting-users-organizations/2013-08/free-webinar-sept-12-how-librarians-are-raising#sthash.5ziKKURG.EMalh7Q1.dpuf"

 


Karen du Toit's insight:

Librarians' input into research!!

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Examining The Future Role Of Libraries at #LIBER2013 | LIBER

by Friedel Grant “A university is just a group of buildings gathered around a library.”

– Shelby Foote

 

With this quotation, Dr. Professor Peter Strohschneider, Chairman of the German Council of Science and Humanities, began his keynote speech at LIBER’s 42nd annual conference in Munich, Germany.

 

“The library is a place in which learning and research happens, and in which knowledge orders are created,” continued Strohschneider. “As Foote suggests, the library lies at the very heart of the academic experience. A university without a library is more or less unthinkable. This being the case, Foote’s perspective raises some important questions when we consider the future of academic libraries.”

 

Strohschneider went on to explain how some of the most notable research discoveries can be attributed to serendipity. These accidental revelations can, however, be thwarted by the current enthusiasm for modern search engines which only lead researchers to targeted results.

 

From this opening talk, the future of libraries was repeatedly explored over the three days of the conference – particularly in relation to the vast quantities of data currently being created and the library’s role in helping researchers to manage and sift through that data.

 

With two new scholarly articles being published every minute, Dr. Jan Velterop asserted that structures such as nano-publications would become an essential tool for researchers to identify relevant material. This would, in turn, require libraries and publishers to adjust to a new world where the scientific journal was valued more as a source of raw material, in which researchers could look for knowledge patterns, than something to read.

 

4 Slideshares from the Conf:

1. 

The future of the science publishing ego-system http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/liber-munich-26june2013-2

2. 

Roadmaps, Roles and Re-engineering: Developing Data Informatics Capability in Libraries

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/roadmaps-roles-and-reengineering-developing-data-informatics-capability-in-libraries

 

3. 

A Revolution in Open Science: Open Data and the Role of Libraries (Professor Geoffrey Boulton at LIBER 2013

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/boulton-gsb-presentationlibermunich

 

4. 

Enabling Data-Intensive Science Through Data Infrastructures

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/morais-liber42-datainfrastructures-1

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Future role of libraries! 

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Reinventing our libraries

Reinventing our libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries are losing out to the Internet as the new generation of researchers is switching over to social network technologies to gather, create and share information, according to an expert. Addressing the National Conference on Reaching Out to Users Through Technology (ROUTE 2013) – Enhancing Innovative Library Services in Open Environment recently, R R Hirwani, director of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) Unit for Research and Development of Information Products, said the need of the hour is that libraries should plan for and build services that fit the work habits of new researchers, with an emphasis on the flexibility and remixing of content and services.
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Libraries of the future!
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10 Questions to Ask a Research Facility Before You Visit

By Kimberly Powell:

 

"Whether you're planning a trip to the State Historical Society, the Family History Library, the National Archives or the local courthouse, it pays to be prepared. Avoid frustration and increase your research time by asking these 10 question in advance of your visit.
1. What are the regular research hours?

2. Are there any holidays or special closures?

3. In what form are the records available?

4. Are there any record restrictions that will affect research?

5. What unique records or collections are available?

6. Are there restrictions on copying?

7. What can and can't I bring with me to the facility? Anything I absolutely need to bring?

8. What are the best times to visit?

9. Is there a lunchroom? Nearby parking? Public transportation?

10. Is there a particular archivist, librarian or staff member who specializes in my area of interest?"

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New LinkedIn Group: Library and Information Research Methods

New LinkedIn Group: Library and Information Research Methods | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

David Haynes (a member of the DREaM project workshop “cadre”) has set up a new group on LinkedIn for anyone interested in LIS research methods. 


Via Lia Sant
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