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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast)

More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"More Podcast, Less Process is a podcast featuring interviews with archivists, librarians, preservationists, technologists, and information professionals about interesting work and projects within and involving archives, special collections, and cultural heritage. Topics include appraisal and acquisition, arrangement and description, reference, outreach and education, collection management, physical and digital preservation, and infrastructure and technology.

Hosts: Jefferson Bailey, Metropolitan New York Library Council & Joshua Ranger, AudioVisual Preservation Solutions.

Episodes are available here and through Internet Archive, SoundCloud, iTunes, and direct download. You can also follow via the RSS feed. All episodes are released CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US. For more information, email Jefferson at jbailey at metro dot org."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interview with archivists about video archiving.

Check series of podcasts (7 before this one) here: http://keepingcollections.org/more-podcast-less-process/

 

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Archives to Earbuds: Podcasting Digital Collections at the Kansas Historical Society at The Interactive Archivist

Archives to Earbuds: Podcasting Digital Collections at the Kansas Historical Society at The Interactive Archivist | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Case Studies in Utilizing Web 2.0 to Improve the Archival Experience.
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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Futurist Thomas Frey:

"Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books.
Libraries exist to give us access to information. Until recently, books were one of the more efficient forms of transferring information from one person to another. Today there are 17 basic forms of information that are taking the place of books, and in the future there will be many more…"

 

"Here is a list of 17 primary categories of information that people turn to on a daily basis. While they are not direct replacements for physical books, they all have a way of eroding our reliance on them. There may be more that I’ve missed, but as you think through the following media channels, you’ll begin to understand how libraries of the future will need to function:
Games 
Digital Books 
Audio Books 
Magazines 
Music 
Photos 
Videos 
Television 
Movies
Radio 
Blogs 
Podcasts 
Apps 
Presentations 
Courseware 
Personal Networks 
Each of these forms of information has a place in future libraries. Whether or not physical books decline or even disappear has little relevance in the overall scheme of future library operations."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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License to thrill: digital copyright | Lexology (Use of Images Online) - podcast

License to thrill: digital copyright | Lexology (Use of Images Online) - podcast | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Morton Fraser
Austin Flynn, Sam Price and Gordon White:

"Have you ever used an image from a Google search for a presentation or uploaded the image to your Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or Flickr account?

Have you ever thought about the implications of copyright?

Morton Fraser’s IP experts, Austin Flynn and Same Price, are joined by Gordon White from FatBuzz to discuss the use of images throughout social media networks; what exactly are the implications of ‘good, old fashioned’ copyright in the digital age?

Now that images are very much part of social media, with 240million uploaded to Facebook everyday (that’s 3,000 per second), and are ‘part of the public domain’ who exactly owns what and can you ‘innocently’ use another’s image?

They ask; what is the law surrounding the use of images online? How can you protect yourself and your images? Which license should you use - creative or commercial commons? What are the implications for bloggers? Are T&Cs of these licenses clear enough?"

 

Podcast: http://www.morton-fraser.com/publications/podcasts/3178_license_to_thrill_digital_copyright

 


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Searching Podcasts For Competitive Intelligence

Searching Podcasts For Competitive Intelligence | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

BY IAN SMITH:

"Here is a quick tip for online researchers looking for competitive intelligence data via the spoken word. Since the advent of Web 2.0, individuals has had the opportunity to share information in the form of audio clips which can be posted as podcasts. Podcasts are great outlets to listen to insights from experts in their respective domains. To access podcasts, researchers can use different approaches to find relevant content. Here are three ways that you can try out."


Via Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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RB 200: The Library Of The Future | Berkman Center - podcast

RB 200: The Library Of The Future | Berkman Center - podcast | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @trisaratop: Berkman Center for Internet & Society talks about the Future of Libraries (audio available): http://t.co/UrdYsybD...

 

"The technological advancements of the past twenty years have rendered the future of the library as a physical space, at least, as uncertain as it has ever been. The information that libraries were once built to house in the form of books and manuscripts can now be accessed in the purely digital realm, as evidenced by initiatives like the Digital Public Library of America, which convenes for the second time this Friday in San Francisco. But libraries still have profound cultural significance, indicating that even if they are no longer necessary for storing books they will continue to exist in some altered form. Radio Berkman host David Weinberger postulated in his book Too Big To Know that the book itself is no longer an appropriate knowledge container – it has been supplanted by the sprawling knowledge networks of the internet. The book’s subtitle is "Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room." Inspired by the work of Harvard Graduate School of Design students in Biblioteca 2: Library Test Kitchen – who spent the semester inventing and building library innovations ranging from nap carrels to curated collections displayed on book trucks to digital welcome mats – we turned the microphone around and had library expert Matthew Battles ask David, "When the smartest person in the room is the room, how do we design the room?" Matthew Battles is the Managing Editor and Curatorial Practice Fellow at the Harvard metaLAB. He wrote Library: an Unquiet History and a biography of Harvard’s Widener Library."

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