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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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29 Moments Any Librarian Knows Too Well

29 Moments Any Librarian Knows Too Well | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"I'm looking for this book, I forget the title, but there's a dog on the cover...?"
Karen du Toit's insight:

All of these! We can relate!

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Libraries Changed My Life

Libraries Changed My Life | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Real life accounts from library patrons whose lives have been changed for the better by libraries.

 

Libraries Changed My Life (LCML) is the brainchild of two librarians from two parts of the country. Ingrid is a children’s and teen librarian from New York City. Natalie is a systems librarian from rural Florida. Together we’re hoping to create a place where people can tell their library stories, and those who are questioning the value of libraries can see their amazing impact. LCML is an independent, grassroots movement to spread library love across the country.

Why we’re here:

Libraries are valuable—and valued. In addition to traditional services like book lending, research help and children’s programs (still the services Americans value most), libraries offer free wifi, technology training, free or low-cost public meeting spaces, affordable printing, access to music and the arts, and other services our neighborhoods need.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries are valubale - accounts from patrons!

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Libraries built by users- Expert Discussion with Anette Klein- Goethe-Institut 

Libraries built by users- Expert Discussion with Anette Klein- Goethe-Institut  | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries Built by Users – An Interview with Annette Klein http://t.co/J2pHyiw0...

 

[...] the library can use an acquisition profile to select relevant eBooks from the total collection of titles available. Library users are given access to the desired titles on the aggregation platform, and the title data are entered into the library’s online catalogue.

When a user comes across a PDA eBook in the catalogue, it will look just like any other eBook in the library’s collection. Via a link contained in the title data, the user is rerouted to the provider’s platform, where a free preview of the book is initially available prior to purchase.

Full access, which requires payment, is only triggered by more intensive use – just what constitutes intensive use is defined differently from one platform to another: it may be if the same title is accessed several times, if it is accessed beyond a certain time limit or if the book is copied, printed or downloaded."

[...] The library can determine whether a book should be purchased permanently upon initial intensive use, or whether access should first be granted in the form of a temporary personal loan."

 

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Scholars and the Public Can and Must Co-Exist - Howard Dodson / New York Times #libraries

Scholars and the Public Can and Must Co-Exist - Howard Dodson / New York Times #libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Scholars and the Public Can and Must Co-Exist New York Times

Howard Dodson Jr., director of the Howard University library system, was formerly the director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, part of the New York Public..."

 

"The plan to renovate the New York Public Library’s main building is a return to the past as well as a gateway to the future. It does not pose the threats to scholarship that many of its critics assert.

The plan, more than a decade old, was the library’s initial response to the post-9/11 economic crisis that challenged the futures of all cultural institutions. The New York Public Library could not sustain four research centers and 85 branch libraries.Then, the digital revolution, coming on the heels of 9/11, forced all libraries to rethink their identities and missions."

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Stepping Out of the Library | The User Experience

Stepping Out of the Library | The User Experience | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Stepping out of the library to increase user satisfaction and use.

 

Aaron Schmidt:

User experience, librarian-style http://t.co/FqP6ubnc ;

 

"It takes practice to get the hang of thinking and talking about user experience. Here are some tools that will help you develop these skills and offer some insights about your library at the same time."

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Libraries and Ebooks: What’s Going On?

Libraries and Ebooks: What’s Going On? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Libby Fischer Hellmann:

A discussion about ebooks for patrons with four librarians...

 

"With all of the discussions, opinions, and analyses of ebooks these days, one of the aspects we don’t hear enough about are libraries and how they’re adapting to the e-verse. An article in PW recently discussed the situation from a library’s point of view and pointed out some issues that are impeding the growth of ebook borrowing. As both an author and an avid user of libraries, I decided to approach it a little differently.

 

A large percentage of my readers, maybe even a majority, have borrowed my books from the library in the past, so I’m especially interested how and if library patrons are able to download my ebooks easily. So far, the answer is “kinda-sorta.” The only way I know that patrons can download ebooks is through Overdrive, and there seems to be some issues with Overdrive’s inventory, ie some libraries have titles that other libraries don’t. In other words, no consistency. Which is not a good thing for a mid-list author."

 

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Is It About Us, or Is It About Them? Libraries and Collections in a Patron-Driven World | ALA Editions

Is It About Us, or Is It About Them? Libraries and Collections in a Patron-Driven World | ALA Editions | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

New post to the blog from @Looptopper on the tension between librarian selection and a patron-driven acquisition http://t.co/LH7LTCa4...

 

"As budgets get tighter and prices keep rising, libraries are increasingly forced to think about ways to minimize waste in their collections. A sudden sharp interest in patron-driven acquisition solutions is one indicator of this concern, the idea being that when we let patrons select the books we buy, the less likely we are to buy books they don't want.

 

But this trend gives rise to deeply uncomfortable questions.

What does "waste" actually mean in a library collection—especially in a research library?

Can we ever know for certain that an uncirculated book won't be important at some point in the future?

Won't patron-driven processes lead to a breakdown in the collection's coherence?

And if we're just here to "give the people what they want," what meaningful function do librarians serve?

Do we just become shipping-and-receiving clerks?"

 

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It Is My Library! The public can change your mind | by John Berry at Blatant Berry | Library Journal

It Is My Library! The public can change your mind | by John Berry at Blatant Berry  | Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By John N. Berry III:

"Although it is often perceived as interference, or “meddling,” the presumption of ownership by people who live in the jurisdiction of a local public library and their resulting strong opinions about how the place should operate are assets to be nurtured and treasured. Yes, the phenomenon regularly causes disputes about library policies and purposes and makes for controversial community debate. Indeed, library professionals and managers are frequently forced by public opinion, bolstered by media coverage, to operate libraries in ways quite different from their preferred practices."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good reminder!

Who's library is it anyway?

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The Not-So-Secret Keys to Great Customer Service | Public Libraries Online

The Not-So-Secret Keys to Great Customer Service | Public Libraries Online | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Is good customer service giving patrons everything they want when they want it? Is it being nice to everyone all the time, no matter what? How can you inspire and maintain positive customer service throughout your library? These essayists agree that the impetus comes from the top, but the effect spreads throughout the organization. I hope that the following insights help your library to become a truly welcoming place for everyone!"


Via Robin Illsley
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7 Things Library Customers Want NOW | Customer Service and Library Patrons | Text a Librarian - Text Messaging for Libraries

7 Things Library Customers Want NOW | Customer Service and Library Patrons | Text a Librarian - Text Messaging for Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Lisa Carlucci Thomas:

"What attracts library customers to today’s libraries? The rise of mobile culture and the smart phone society brings a dynamic shift in expectations about how, when, and where to access information. Endless media streams, interactive news feeds, and autonomous research options provide numerous avenues for information-seeking customers. What factors draw their attention to the library, rather than a crowdsourced data channel, commercial service, or search engine?

1. Convenience.

2. Community

3. Immediacy

4. Accuracy

5. Customization

6. Privacy

7. Service"

 

Read more: http://www.textalibrarian.com/mobileref/7-things-library-customers-want-now-customer-service-and-library-patrons/

 

 


Via Sophie D.F.
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New survey confirms librarians’ commitment to protecting privacy rights | American Libraries Magazine

New survey confirms librarians’ commitment to protecting privacy rights | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American Libraries Magazine, the magazine of the American Library Association, delivers news and information about the library community.

 

Jennifer Petersen:

"Some of the highlights from the 2012 survey include:

1. Librarians remain concerned about privacy and individuals' desire to control access and use of personal information. Ninety-five percent agree or strongly agree that individuals should be able to control who sees their personal information, and more than 95 percent of respondents feel government agencies and businesses shouldn’t share personal information with third parties without authorization and should only be used for a specific purpose.
2. Librarians affirmed their commitment to the profession's long-standing ethic of protecting library users' privacy. Nearly 100 percent of respondents agreed that “Libraries should never share personal information, circulation records or Internet use records with third parties unless it has been authorized by the individual or by a court of law,” and 76 percent feel libraries are doing all they can to prevent unauthorized access to individual’s personal information and circulation records. Overall, nearly 80 percent feel libraries should play a role in educating the general public about privacy issues.
3. When compared to the 2008 survey, the results showed that the responses given by the 2012 respondents generally mirrored those of the 2008 respondents, with data showing a slight decline in the level of concern over privacy. For example, in both surveys, the vast majority (95 percent in 2008, 90 percent in 2012) of respondents expressed concern that "companies are collecting too much personal information about me and other individuals." However those who “strongly” agreed dropped from 70 percent in 2008 to only 54 percent in 2012."

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What Patrons Teach Us—and Publishers Should Learn — The Digital Shift

What Patrons Teach Us—and Publishers Should Learn — The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

What Patrons Teach Us—and Publishers Should Learn - http://t.co/bMG7Oo4a via @ShiftTheDigital #libraries #ALIA..."

 

A new report from LJ indicates that it is vital for libraries to connect with digital patrons, especially ebook readers, and satisfying their expectations has a meaningful upside for both the library users and the publishing community.
The report, “Mobile Devices, Mobile Content, and Library Apps,”(http://www.thedigitalshift.com/research/patron-profiles/)

 a part of LJ’s ongoing Patron Profiles series, points out that even though digital users—defined as a patron who uses a smartphone, ereader, or tablet—remain a minority, they are, nonetheless, more active than the general patron not only in digital services but also “in virtually every metric of library activity.”

As such, they could guide librarians in understanding the intersection of their print holdings and their growing digital collections.

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Library Journal’s Patron Profiles: Understanding the behavior and preferences of U.S. public library users — The Digital Shift

Library Journal’s Patron Profiles: Understanding the behavior and preferences of U.S. public library users — The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Based on in-depth research among a national sample of nearly 2500 participants and Library Journal editorial analysis, this groundbreaking study—the first to target library consumers in the context of all consumers—unveils who uses public libraries"

 

"... regular public library users don’t just borrow books. They are also active books buyers who make many of their purchasing decisions based on the authors or books they first discover in the library.

In fact, over 50 percent of all library users go on to purchase books by an author they were introduced to in the library.

This finding is just one of the many key insights to emerge from “Library Patrons and Ebook Usage,” the first issue of Library Journal’s Patron Profiles: Understanding the behavior and preferences of U.S. public library users. Based on in-depth research among a national sample of nearly 2500 participants and Library Journal editorial analysis, this groundbreaking study—the first to target library consumers in the context of all consumers—unveils who uses public libraries, why they use them, and how that use may change.
“Patron Profiles looks at the library patron as consumer of content—physical and digital—and analyzes the relationship between the library and other channels, from brick-and-mortar bookstores to ebooks to Netflix,” said Ian Singer, Library Journal’s VP and Group Publisher. “At a time of rapid technological and social change, librarians, publishers and technology providers need to understand consumer attitudes while developing approaches to meet market demand and needs, and this in-depth research will help inform strategic planning.”

 

http://www.thedigitalshift.com/research/patron-profiles/

 

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Library Journal Releases Patron Profiles Detailing Who Uses Libraries and Why

"They are also active books buyers who make many of their purchasing decisions based on the authors or books they first discover in the library.

In fact, over 50 percent of all library users go on to purchase books by an author they were introduced to in the library. This finding is just one of the many key insights to emerge from “Library Patrons and Ebook Usage,” the first issue of Library Journal’s Patron Profiles: Understanding the behavior and preferences of U.S. public library users.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/459725#ixzz1c3eLTsHoNew York, NY (PRWEB) October 19, 2011 You will never think of library users the same way again. Case in point: regular public library users don’t just borrow books."

 

 

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