The Information P...
Follow
Find tag "open-data"
15.8K views | +0 today
The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Librarians needed to facilitate Open Data, by Andrew Wesolek - Open Access Now

Librarians needed to facilitate Open Data, by Andrew Wesolek - Open Access Now | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Andrew Wesolek:

"Tim Poisot’s recent blog post on facilitating open data in ecology illustrates a desire to make ecology data open, while admitting that “there are so many peculiarities attached to datasets that sharing them is by nature a difficult task.” Mr. Poisot goes on to offer some interesting solutions to enhance the current practices in data formatting. Perhaps most interestingly, though, he does not mention engaging those who are specifically trained in the organization of information–librarians. This should provide further incentive for our efforts to effectively communicate the breadth of our value to our faculty.

In advocating for Open Access, we often focus on educating our colleagues to the benefits of making their research open, but how well are we supporting those who already want to make their research, or data in this case, open, but are unsure of how to share it effectively?"

Karen du Toit's insight:

Librarians needed to facilitate OA!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

TED Blog | Design Mind magazine highlights TEDGlobal 2012 - "Radical Openness"

TED Blog | Design Mind magazine highlights TEDGlobal 2012 - "Radical Openness" | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading -- through TED.com, our annual conferences, the annual TED Prize and local TEDx events.

 

"The theme of TEDGlobal 2012 was “Radical Openness” — a topic that caught the eye of Design Mind magazine. The publication, from longtime TEDGlobal supporter frog, has dedicated an entire issue to the conference. Including Q&As with speakers, behind-the-scenes looks at preparations for talks and an abundance of endeavors related to talks, we picked a few of our favorite articles from this unique vantage point of the conference.

Below, some pieces to peruse.

 

“What’s the Value of Collaborative Consumption?” by Hannah Piercy - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/what-s-the-value-of-collaborative-consumption.html

 

“The End of Education As We Know It” by Scott Barry Kaufman - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/the-end-of-education-as-we-know-it.html

 

“How Far Should Governments Open Up?” by Hannah Piercey - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/how-far-should-governments-open-up.html

 

“Brainiacs” by Ernest Beck - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/brainiacs.html

 

“The Maker Movement Meets Big Business” by Reena Jana - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/the-maker-movement-meets-big-business.html

 

 

 


Via Official AndreasCY
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Top Ed-Tech Trends: What's Changed from 2011 to 2012? - by Audrey Watters

Top Ed-Tech Trends: What's Changed from 2011 to 2012? - by Audrey Watters | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by AUDREY WATTERS:

"...the year’s major ed-tech developments. I’ve identified the 10 trends that I think have been 2012’s most interesting and important. I’ll string out the posts that cover these over the next 6 weeks — and not just because it’s time for the obligatory-end-of-year-wrap-up-crap posts that we bloggers churn out throughout the month of December. I find the reflection is useful (although time-consuming), and it’s a good process for me to go through all the news and all my writing to assess what’s innovative and what’s hype and what's changed and why."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Information Specialist's Scoop
Scoop.it!

Library catalog metadata: Open licensing or public domain? - Creative Commons

Library catalog metadata: Open licensing or public domain? - Creative Commons | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Timothy Vollmer:
"As reported a few weeks ago, OCLC has recommended (http://www.oclc.org/news/releases/2012/201248.htm) that its member libraries adopt the Open Data Commons Attribution license (ODC-BY) (http://opendatacommons.org/licenses/by/1.0/) when they share their library catalog data online. The recommendation to use an open license like ODC-BY is a positive step forward for OCLC because it helps communicate in advance the rights and responsibilities available to potential users of bibliographic metadata from library catalogs. But the decision by OCLC to recommend the licensing route — as opposed to releasing bibliographic metadata into the public domain — raises concerns that warrants more discussion."


Via Bibliodata, Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Building the Ecology of Libraries – An Interview with Brewster Kahle | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Building the Ecology of Libraries – An Interview with Brewster Kahle | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Interviewers:

"Kai Eckert is computer scientist and vice head of the IT departement of the Mannheim University Library. He coordinates the linked open data activities and developed the linked data service of the library. He held various presentations, both national and international, about linked data and open data.

Adrian Pohl has been working at the Cologne-based North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Center (hbz) since 2008. His main focuses are Open Data, Linked Data and its conceptual, theoretical and legal implications. Since June 2010 Adrian has been coordinating the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Working Group on Open Bibliographic Data."

 

"At OKCon 2011, we had the opportunity to interview Brewster Kahle who is a computer engineer, internet entrepreneur, activist, and digital librarian. He is the founder and director of the Internet Archive, a non-profit digital library with the stated mission of “universal access to all knowledge”. Besides the widely known “Wayback Machine“, where archived copies of most webpages can be accessed, the Internet Archive is very active in the digitization of books, as well, and provides with the “Open Library” a free catalog that aims to describe “every book ever published”. Kahle and his wife, Mary Austin, created the Kahle/Austin Foundation that supports the Internet Archive and other non-profit organizations.

As open data enthusiasts from the library world, we were especially interested in how the activities of the Internet Archive relate to libraries. We wanted to know how its general approach and service could be useful for libraries in Europe.

Brewster Kahle, what is the Internet Archive and what is your vision for its future?..."

Interview here: http://blog.okfn.org/2012/03/23/building-the-ecology-of-libraries-an-interview-with-brewster-kahle/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

WSIS Knowledge Communities: Global Open Access Portal Launched

WSIS Knowledge Communities: Global Open Access Portal Launched | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Global Open Access Portal (GOAP), aiming at presenting a top level view of Open Access to scientific information, was launched at a special side event organized during the UNESCO General Conference, on Tuesday 1 November 2011, at Paris Headquarters.

The portal has country reports from over 148 countries with weblinks to over 2000 initiatives/projects in Member States. The GOAP is a knowledge portal that has the following features:

 

Country-wise distilled knowledge on the status of Open Access

Key organizations engaged in OA in Member States

Thematic focus areas of OA

Important publications on OA coming from different regions of the world

Critical assessment of major barriers to OA in each country

Potential of OA in UNESCO Member States

Funding and deposit mandates

Links to OA initiatives in the world

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Welcome to Open Access Week! - Open Access Week

Welcome to Open Access Week! - Open Access Week | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Learn. Share. Advance

Open Access Week, a global event now entering its fourth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.

 

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

 

Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

Get involved. Participating in Open Access Week can be as simple or involved as you like. It can also be a chance to let your imagination have full rein and come up with something more ambitious, wacky, fun.

 

OA Week is an invaluable chance to connect the global momentum toward open sharing with the advancement of policy changes on the local level. Universities, colleges, research institutes, funding agencies, libraries, and think tanks have used Open Access Week as a platform to host faculty votes on campus open-access policies, to issue reports on the societal and economic benefits of Open Access, to commit new funds in support of open-access publication, and more.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Talk point: Why don't more academics use open educational resources?

Talk point: Why don't more academics use open educational resources? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Many are happy to share their research but far more are reluctant to do the same with teaching resources. Do you value open educational resources? (RT @GdnHigherEd: We'd like to hear from librarians: are your #digital skills in demand?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Aaron Swartz and Too-Comfortable Research Libraries, by Bohyun Kim at Library Hat

Aaron Swartz and Too-Comfortable Research Libraries, by Bohyun Kim at Library Hat | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

If you are a librarian and do not know who Aaron Swartz is, that should probably change now. He helped developing the RSS standard, was the co-founder of Reddit, worked on the Open Library project, downloaded and freed 20% (2.7 million documents) of the Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER) database that charges fees for the United States federal court documents, out of which about 1,600 had privacy issues, played a lead role in preventing the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), and wrote the Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto.


(Photo from Wikipedia)

Karen du Toit's insight:

Extensive argument for libraries and librarians to advocate and continue the activism that was started by Aaron Swartz in his open access campaign!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The impact of open access on librarians | by Fin Galligan, SwetsBlog

The impact of open access on librarians | by Fin Galligan, SwetsBlog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Exploring the potential impact of open access on the librarian and their role within the institution.

 

"...the future of open access for libraries will involve:

More advanced discovery services
Communication, training and networking with own institutional community
Repository building and curation
And to further summarise the above, they all point at developing a strong(er) service culture to look at end-users’ needs directly, rather than focusing on pure collection building. Not by coincidence, these themes are echoed in a paper presented in May 2012 by Lorcan Dempsey (Vice President and Chief Strategist at OCLC), which are nicely summarized on the OCLC’s website. It is easy to apply each of these points to the current and future OA landscape:

“Education, local government, and publishing are being reshaped by economic and networking pressures. Changes here will increasingly drive library changes and libraries need to understand those environments.
Libraries continue to shift from a collection-based view to a service-based view, with deeper engagement with the research, learning and information behaviors of their users.
Community engagement drives the need for new skills, more responsive organizational structures, and a readiness to reallocate resources to important areas.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Web 3.0
Scoop.it!

A roadmap to openness: short report from the Internet of Open Stuff seminar | the internet of things

"The Internet of Things & Services is a major driver for technological development and will dramatically change products, services, and markets. It not only empowers people to collaborate, but any product or service developed by people – or those emerging from such collaboration. The technology will definitely change business, but the social implications will change our society beyond our wildest dreams. We are in the transition to a new society: We are in the 2nd Renaissance."


Via Pierre Tran
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

What is Linked Open Data? Europeana releases an animation to explain | Open GLAM - Vimeo animation

What is Linked Open Data? Europeana releases an animation to explain | Open GLAM - Vimeo animation | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Joris Pekel is a Berlin based Community Coordinator for the OKFN and works specifically with digital heritage. He is co-editor of the Open GLAM blog:

 

"Linked Open Data is getting more attention from the information world, as well as from memory institutions. But what exactly is it and more important, why is it a good thing? To explain this, Europeana has released an animation."

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Facilitating Access to the Web of Data - a guide for librarians

Facilitating Access to the Web of Data - a guide for librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @magnusenger: "Facilitating Access to the Web of Data: A Guide for Librarians" http://t.co/vAoOKZiI"

 

"The web is changing from a web of documents to a web of data; from a web that can be read by humans, to one that can be read by machines. These are fascinating advances for anyone interested in the changing nature of the web and the way we access information. The technologies being forged in this new landscape will provide a host of opportunities for library and information professionals to shape the information landscape of the future."

 

"Key topics covered include:

• open data
• A semantic web: one that’s meaningful to computers
• data silos
• the semantic web: the RDF vision
• embedded semantics
• the library and the web of data
• the future of the librarian and the web of data."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Librarians -- Ideas - Open Access Week

Librarians -- Ideas - Open Access Week | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Librarians have played a crucial, leading role in advocating for Open Access worldwide.

 

As a traditional focal point for scholarly communication innovation, libraries continue to exercise their leadership by encouraging faculty members, administrators, and students to engage in Open Access Week activities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Archives Outside » What is #LODLAM ?

LODLAM stands for Linked Open Data in Libraries, Archives and Museums.

 

This is a very exciting, innovative area. If you do a Google search on “LODLAM” you bring up a lot of hits, however, sitting right at the top of the list is lod-lam.net. I’ve embedded an Introductory talk on LODLAM by Jon Voss from that site which is a great place to start the LODLAM journey. If you’d like to learn more then I’d highly recommend exploring the websites resources further; they include talks, slideshows, reading lists and information on upcoming events. For those of us in the Southern Hemisphere it’s also worth noting the LODLAM-NZ is coming up in Wellington on 1 December 2011 (Bookings Open).

 

- Fiona Sullivan 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Europe’s national librarians support opening up their data via CC0 - Creative Commons

Europe’s national librarians support opening up their data via CC0 - Creative Commons | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators.
more...
No comment yet.