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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Law Librarians Survey: The New Normal - The American Lawyer

Law Librarians Survey: The New Normal - The American Lawyer | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Alan Cohen:

Librarians have gotten accustomed to squeezing more out of their budgets, according to our 12th annual Law Librarian Survey.

Read more: http://www.americanlawyer.com/PubArticleTAL.jsp?id=1202607834446&Law_Librarians_Survey_The_New_Normal#ixzz2ZCG2aKZv

Karen du Toit's insight:

Law Librarians (and others, for sure) working smarter!

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What is a librarian without a library? – another perspective

What is a librarian without a library? – another perspective | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
By Felicity Cross of the Scottish Law Librarians Group
"Recently whenever I have been thinking about being a law librarian and what that means the issue of space has kept popping up.
To try and come to some conclusions about what it is exactly that I do, I thought about the different parts of my job role. And distilling them all down to their smallest common denominator; I found that it is to provide our fee earners with time and space. This may sound a little bit grandiose but bear with me.

We save time for our fee earner by analysing and searching through the best resources to make sure they have the right information at the right time, that it is up-to-date and reliable. We provide space by filtering that information, providing them with only what is relevant to their specific circumstances; clearing a space for them to think in a world filled with seemingly endless amounts of information. We give them the space and time that they need to provide the best service possible to our clients."
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Law Librarian Blog: Now You See It, Now You Don't, Part I: Free Legal Research Services on the Web

Law Librarian Blog: Now You See It, Now You Don't, Part I: Free Legal Research Services on the Web | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @LIICornell: Law Librarian Blog: Now You See It, Now You Don't, Part I: Free Legal Research Services on the Web.

 

"In the early days of free caselaw research services, it seemed like new search services were popping up all over the web. But without strong financial support, many disappeared almost as quickly as they had appeared."

 

- Google Scholar for Legal Opinions and Journals http://scholar.google.co.za/

- Public Library of Law (supported by Fastcase) http://www.plol.org/Pages/Search.aspx ;
- the semi-"useful" FindACase (supported by VersusLaw). http://www.findacase.com/

 

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Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries

Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Michel-Adrien:

"At a session this morning at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) in Toronto, New York-based consultant Nigel Holloway outlined some of the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among CALL members."

 

"Some 140 law librarians responded, about one quarter of the CALL membership, with two fifths of respondents coming from law firms, a bit over one third from from courthouse libraries, and about one sixth from universities. More than 50% of respondents worked in small libraries (1-3 staff), more or less 20% in medium-sized libraries (4-9), and about one quarter in libraries with more than 10 staff members."

[...]

"The survey is quite revealing about the trend toward digital content. Right now, some 45% of respondents state that more than 40% of their content is in digital format. 70% of respondents expect this to be the situation by 2014."

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The Running Librarian: Evaluating e-books in Law Libraries - Slideshare

The Running Librarian: Evaluating e-books in Law Libraries - Slideshare | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @aallnet: RT @WestlawSmallLaw: RT @erroladamsjdmls: The Running Librarian: Evaluating e-books in Law Libraries http://t.co/OsqVg6ox...

 

by JAMES MULLAN:

"The iLibrarian [Ellyssa Kroski] has published the slides from a recent presentation on e-books, which I've embedded below. In her talk she outlines some of the benefits and downsides to purchasing and maintaining e-book collections. If you've not thought about e-books before, this is a good introduction to the topic."

 

Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/ellyssa/evaluating-ebook-offerings?from=ss_embed&nbsp

 

 

Valid information for librarians from any library to consider, with statistics of tablet and ebook use 

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Yale Law School Library leads open access | Library Stuff

Yale Law School Library leads open access | Library Stuff | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The Law School Library added roughly 3000 faculty-published scholarly articles from legal journals to an open access database on its website over the past year — giving it the largest online repository of its kind.
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Dewey B Strategic: ALM Releases 2013 Librarian Survey. Spending Down, Embedding . Complex Research and Competitive Intelligence Surge. How Do Law Librarians Do It All?

Dewey B Strategic: ALM Releases 2013 Librarian Survey. Spending Down, Embedding . Complex Research and Competitive Intelligence Surge. How Do Law Librarians Do It All? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

American Lawyer Media Legal Intelligence released the 2013 Law Librarian Survey data earlier this week.

 Library Director's Rule Contract Negotiations

Firms recognize the special expertise of Library Directors in high ticket and complex licencing negotiations. 87% of the firms have kept this responsibility in the hands of the Library Director. 

 

In reviewing the data I am struck by the terrific challenge library chiefs face in the current 

environment. Law firm profits are reviving, lawyers continue to demand the best and most strategic information resources for their practices and yet  library chiefs have succeeded in containing costs. The survey give clues how they achieve this. Librarians are sharp negotiators who assess not only price but the comparative value and usability of the content. They also employ sophisticated tools for analysing the ROI for the resources they invest in. These talents are paying off big time for the firms which employ these experts. [...] A Sampling of Key Trends From the 2013 Law Library Survey

58% of Library Chiefs are responsible for overseeing Competitive Intelligences43 % of Library Chiefs are responsible for Knowledge managementThe average budget was down $500,000Fewer firms were purchasing eBools.  Number dropped from 24% to 21% of libraries.

Survey: http://www.almlegalintel.com/SurveyDescription.aspx?id=Q/K8nmK4pG4=&type=fEFgIaD+grg=

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Survey of legal librarians > Interesting!

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Beautiful Government Law Libraries

Beautiful Government Law Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

http://t.co/6QkhyomS

 

"These are libraries maintained for the use of government lawmakers and staff at the national, state or local levels. Some are open to the public, others are reserved for lawmakers and their staff."


Via NELLCO
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Kenna Johnson's curator insight, March 6, 1:18 AM

Besides the fact that these are designed for Gov, Officials, it doesn't really apply to government, but these are amazing! Take a look! It almost makes me want to be a government lawmaker. Almost.

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Collection development for law libraries — Slaw

Collection development for law libraries — Slaw | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Shaunna Mireau:

"I attended an excellent session on collection development for law libraries at the Canadian Association of Law Libraries Conference last week."

 

"Collection development symposium – audience suggestions:

- Continuous need for re-evaluating your collection, talking to your users and finding out their requirements.
- Resource sharing agreements and relationships. Look to work together with different library units. Divide up responsibility for different topics.
- Negotiate for the portion of the content you want (commentary/analysis).
- Work with the publishers on bundling of the electronic commentary on their sites with pricing and licensing that works for the users.
- Consortia and interlibrary loans.
- Visit vendor booths and give feedback. Request bound formats – talk to authors.
- Needs assessments – feedback from front-line librarians.
- Get your library community involved. Building of relationships and review of collection.
- Communicate and build trust with the vendors.
- Collaboration with other library communities.
- Collection usage statistics are key.
I- mplementing rotational cancellation of loose-leaf services."

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Keeping and Deleting Patron Records in Law Libraries » VoxPopuLII

Keeping and Deleting Patron Records in Law Libraries » VoxPopuLII | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Benjamin Keele:

"As researchers use materials in libraries, their actions tend to generate records—research trails in digital databases, lists of borrowed books, and correspondence with librarians. Most of the time, these records are innocuous, but to facilitate freedom of inquiry, librarians generally hold these records as confidential. This confidentiality is especially important in law libraries because legal matters can be very sensitive and stressful. Researchers implicitly trust librarians with at least hints of concerns the researchers would prefer not be generally known. If researchers knew any records of their questions could become known to others, some researchers would avoid using library collections or asking librarians for advice, guidance that very well may help them find valuable information.

In her interesting post, Meg Leta points out that, despite some exhortations that information on Web lasts forever, most information now online will disappear at some point. Websites go down when their owners fail to pay hosting fees. Data is deleted, either by purpose or mistake. A file sitting on a drive or disc will, without maintenance, eventually becomes inaccessible because the storage media has decayed or because the hardware and software needed to read the file has become obsolete. Since information will tend to vanish without action on our part, Leta suggests we should instead focus on actively saving information that is worth keeping.

Leta makes an excellent point, but I’d suggest that in addition to thinking carefully about what information needs to be kept, legal professionals also should consider whether certain types of information warrant purposeful destruction. I’d also suggest that for law libraries, patrons should be given the ability to retain, either through the library or themselves, records of their use of library resources."

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Law Librarian Blog: Digital Access Isn't Everything

Law Librarian Blog: Digital Access Isn't Everything | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Law Librarian Blog: Digital Access Isn't Everything: Digital Access Isn't Everything. 

 

There is a great article in the Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription required) by Brian Cowan, 'Digital Natives' Aren't Necessarily Digital Learners, which takes on the concept of digital natives as digital learners, and concludes that while technology may deliver information in convenient ways, it will not necessarily motivate individuals to learn.

 

Cowan describes four myths of digital learning:

Myth 1: Digital natives are automatically digital learners.

Myth 2: Students prefer using technology to learn.

Myth 3: Cyberspace is the new classroom.

Myth 4: Today's students are multi­taskers.

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