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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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3D Printing Is Just the Beginning: The Future of Makerspaces within Academic Libraries | Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)

"Live Webcast
November 7, 2012
11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern

90 minutes

Description: The maker movement is growing across the country and world. With interactive, participatory events and growing local communities, we've seen a shift. Individuals, professionals, and hobbyists from areas such as engineering, design, science, art, and more are coming together with one common thread: the desire to make.

Public libraries were the first on the scene to take notice and respond, but now we're beginning to see academic libraries recognize this untapped potential for their own communities. This emerging learning trend holds the promise of enormous change, bringing many researchers and students together from across disciplines in a truly collaborative way. This movement is about more than just the purchase of expensive equipment; it involves engagement, outreach, and knowledge about what drives the academic community. The academic environment is shifting toward content creation in a variety of forms, in turn reshaping learning, curriculums, and research across the board. In order for libraries to continue to support the research and learning needs of their institutions, it is critical to go beyond traditional library materials, to understand what new resources and technologies the library can support for all on campus to use."

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Palm City library branch goes high tech with Idea Lab - Palm Beach Post

Palm City library branch goes high tech with Idea Lab - Palm Beach Post | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Michael Readling:

" The Idea Lab at the Cummings Library offers patrons the opportunity to use new technologies such as a MacBook Air, iPad, iPod Touch and even a recording studio which comes complete with a green screen for digital productions.
The lab offers the ability to get acquainted with the new technology – much of which is being taught in grade school – as well as put together productions for school projects, or just for fun."

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The Labs @ Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Developing Policies & Ordering Equipment | Library as Incubator Project

The Labs @ Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Developing Policies & Ordering Equipment | Library as Incubator Project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Guest blogger Emily Fear to showcase a new digital literacy initiative at CLP called The Labs. For this installment, we examine the nuts and bolts of launching a digital makerspace in a large library system by taking a look at policies and equipment.

"The official launch of the The Labs is two months away, and the team is laying the groundwork for what the project will become. Building a functional infrastructure for a project like this requires developing a set of uniform policies and procedures for each Lab site, as well as researching, ordering and cataloging the necessary equipment. While these processes don’t offer the immediate thrills of watching teens develop their filmmaking or music production skills, they are necessary steps to ensure The Labs are a success.

New cables and equipment!
The selection process for equipment and software is based on several factors. Ideas were gleaned from pre-existing digital learning lab models, such as Chicago Public Library’s YouMedia and the Digital Media Lab at Skokie Public Library. The Labs coordinators also consulted with Drew Davidson of Carnegie Mellon University’s Entertainment Technology Center and Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s programming partners Hip Hop On L.O.C.K and Pittsburgh Filmmakers and the CLP – Main Teen Advisory Council. The overall mission of The Labs also has influence over equipment and software purchases; items are assessed for how accessible and easy they will be to use."

"Corey Wittig, Digital Services Librarian at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, took the number of Lab spaces and the program’s budget into account and had to limit purchases to what is absolutely necessary for each site, prompting the current emphasis on ordering items that have the most potential for use. Quality and affordability have been important in choosing key Labs software and equipment– iMacs, MacBook laptops, basic audio and video recording devices and cables–but accessibility is also a top concern. Most teens should be able to come into a Labs site and use the resources with relative ease. Digital media recording and editing software like Apple’s iMovie and GarageBand, however basic, are perfect for beginners, yet still handy for more advanced creators. As Wittig says, “You don’t necessarily need top of the line equipment or software,” because what most Pittsburgh teens need are the tools to get started."

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Something Old, Something New: Dicing Data At NYPL Labs | Meredith Schwartz

Something Old, Something New: Dicing Data At NYPL Labs | Meredith Schwartz | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Meredith Schwartz:

"The home base for the New York Public Library (NYPL) Labs is a strange mix of old and new. A bunch of modern cubicles hover incongruously amid the stately marble walls of what used to be a courtyard in the venerable Schwarzman Building, before the need for more space convinced the library to press it into service. It’s not a bad metaphor for what the labs do: turn the library’s substantial historical holdings into something new, useful, and a little bit quirky.
Thus far, the labs has spearheaded four projects, all of them aimed at not only digitizing physical collections but at turning their digital versions into data that can be sliced and diced with all of today’s tools. Ben Vershbow, manager of NYPL Labs, sees the first stage of his mission as “extending the machine-readable data so it can be recontextualized—the library as data clearinghouse.” As a vision, it adheres more strictly to the library’s traditional role of information collector and provider than many of today’s library reinventions—library as community center, for example. At the same time, it removes the “book warehouse” or even “digital book virtual warehouse” connotations by giving the library a front and center role in parsing the data into meaningful categories that make it usable."

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Director sees library's role as creation hub / LJWorld.com

Director sees library's role as creation hub / LJWorld.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Current plans for the library expansion include what Allen is calling “creation zones” that will be set up in the basement of the library. There will be sound equipment, there will be video equipment, there will be computer tools to help people create everything from logos to funky photos.“But I want people to understand we’re not just talking about art here,” Allen said. “We might have the tools for you to create a commercial for your business or design a website. We think this is a way we can help the town grow and create vibrant local businesses.”


Via Trudy Raymakers
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Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012

Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
An innovative course yields new products, services, and experiences that model the possible future of libraries.

 

by Jonathan Shaw:

“WHAT IF YOU THOUGHT seriously about the library as a laboratory, as a place where people do things, where they make things?” asks Jeffrey Schnapp, addressing his “Library Test Kitchen” class. Libraries as centers of knowledge and learning have a rich history—but an uncharted future. The digital revolution, besides changing the nature of books, is transforming the role of libraries in preserving and disseminating information. “What if the Library of Congress were to become a digital library?” continues Schnapp. “What, then, is the role of the physical public library? This is a source of enormous anxiety at the local level because public libraries” face increasing political pressure, including budget cuts, but “play absolutely fundamental civic roles, often as the only public space that remains in smaller communities.”

[...]

"By semester’s end, the brainstorming sessions had generated dozens of good ideas, and a few had become student projects: Biblio, a conceptualization of a hand-held device for scanning books that tracks and shares research and even makes bibliographic recommendations for further study (see the online video); Timeslice, a “graphical electronic bulletin board” that lets library users post event announcements to a community calendar that incorporates digital graphics; Neo-Carrel, a study chair with a raised platform in front that doubles as a laptop stand and a comfortable place to rest one’s head for a nap (now installed in Lamont library); and a WiFi cold spot, a radically designed room for reflection or refuge from an increasingly connected world.

“We think this is an opportunity to be real catalysts for thoughtful change that can’t easily come from other quarters,” explains Schnapp. “Because we’re not librarians, but instead a community of artists, scholars, engineers—people interested in knowledge—we come at the questions a little bit differently. So we think we can be innovative and breathe some fresh air into a conversation that often is about how many jobs are going to be cut, or what will happen to all the space that is freed up once the stacks move out to the Harvard Depository. That’s a conversation that may have to happen, but it would be a tragedy if that were the only framework in which we thought about the possibilities for enhancing the mission of libraries.”


Via Patrick Provencher
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