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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Librarians before, librarians now, librarians next, by Ned Potter

Librarians before, librarians now, librarians next, by Ned Potter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

>> Very short Prezi on the future of librarianship. Although done in April 2011, it is still valid!

 

"[...]The Gate. I’ve been thinking the role of the librarian as gatekeeper is completely dead – but it hasn’t occurred to me till today that in effect we’ll be manning (and womanning) the other side of the gate. The gate used to have a certain status, a certain gravitas to it – we, the librarian, hold the key to knowledge; come to us and we will let you through (probably). Now the gate is open and people can go through as they please to a large extent – no need to apply to us for permission to enter, just help yourself online. But in future as information perpetuates to such an extent that the diamonds are almost impossible to find in the avalanche of rough, perhaps the old gate will be dusted off and rehung on its hinges. And this time we librarians will be trying to hold back the flood of information, and just letting the legitimate and valued resources leak through to the people on the other side of the gate."

-thewikiman


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Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Health and Ageing
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6 Reasons to Visualize Your Data in the Age of Distraction - Loren Sorenson

6 Reasons to Visualize Your Data in the Age of Distraction - Loren Sorenson | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

This piece was posted by Loren Sorenson for Hubspot, I selected it because as she says "If you aren’t prepared for the visual content revolution, you may be left in the dust.

 

Not convinced? Let's take a look at exactly how visual contentis positively contributing to marketing strategies -- it may just give you the push you need

 

"Learn why visual content is a critical part of your content creation strategy.

 

Here are some highlights:

 

**People remember only 20% of what they read

 

**83% of learning is visual

 

Condenses and Explains Large Amounts of Information

 

**Today, there is too much information on the Internet you have about 3 seconds to catch someone’s eyes so they'll consume your information.

 

Gives Your Brand an Identity

 

**Visual content draws people in, letting viewers better understand your brand's identity

 

Drives User Engagement

 

**If you've ever read a book with a child, you probably know they find pictures more interesting than words; but are adults really that different?

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/Ifujbp]


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janlgordon's comment, April 11, 2012 3:21 PM
Beth Kanter
Thank you for adding me to the wiki and for your kind words, it's greatly appreciated. Yes this is the conversation of the moment so to speak. I'm sure your presentation was amazing. Would love to hear it if you have a replay.
Beth Kanter's comment, April 11, 2012 10:08 PM
Jan: There's a link in the wiki to the live stream of the session - and a lot of notes and resources ... I love this topic! I'm holding myself back from created another scoop.it on it ...
janlgordon's comment, April 13, 2012 10:05 PM
Beth Kanter
Thanks for looking forward to seeing this info. Knowing you, I can imagine that you want to start another scoopit on this topic but it's not necessary because you're already doing a wonderful job covering it now.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Practical Networked Leadership Skills
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7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter

7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

"The advice is from 1962 study and has been updated for today's daily battle with digital overload.   The techniques are very much still valid.

 

 

1. Omission – The concept is simple: you can’t consume everything, so just ignore some. This is a bit dangerous since some of the omitted information might be the most critical. Imagine that the email you ignored was the one where your most important client alerts you to a new opportunity.

 

2. Error – Respond to information without giving due consideration. While a seemingly poor strategy, this is more common than you might think; I mean, who hasn’t reacted to an email, report, or telephone call without thinking through all the consequences because of time constraints or lack of attention?

 

 

3. Queuing – Putting information aside until there is time catch up later. An example is processing email early in the morning, before the business day begins, or reading important reports late at night.

 

 

4. Filtering – This is similar to omission except filtering employs a priority scheme for processing some information while ignoring others. Automated tools are particularly well suited to help filter information. Recommendation engines, search tools, email Inbox rule engines and Tivo are all good examples of tools that can help filter and prioritize information.

 

5. Employing multiple/parallel channels – Doling out information processing tasks; for example, assigning the tracking of Twitter feeds to one person and blog coverage to another person on your team.

 

6. Approximation – Processing information with limited precision. Skimming is an example of approximation. Like omission and error, you can process more information by approximating, but you run the risk of making critical mistakes

 

7. Escaping from the task – Making this someone else’s problem. While it sounds irresponsible, admitting you can’t ‘do it all’ and giving an assignment to someone else is sometimes the best strategy of all."

 

 

 

 

 


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Robin Martin's comment, November 4, 2012 11:12 AM
Great info...thanks for "scooping" Deb!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 4, 2012 4:51 PM
You are welcome Robin. There's definitely some good interest in this topic!