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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Interview with Coca-Cola archivist Phil Mooney

Interview with Coca-Cola archivist Phil Mooney | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Archivist Phil Mooney Reflects on 35 Years of Preserving Coca-Cola’s History and Helping Shape its Future (Archivist Phil Mooney Reflects on 35 Years of Preserving Coca-Cola’s History http://t.co/BA8ivcQaXS...

 

Aside from chronicling, cataloging and curating the company’s advertising materials and more – including rare artwork and collectibles worth hundreds of thousands of dollars – Mooney has served as the brand’s storyteller-in-chief, bringing a historian’s perspective to interviews with The Today Show, the History Channel, CNN and CNBC. He was even once an answer on the trivia game show, Jeopardy!

Karen du Toit's insight:

Coca-Cola Archivist Phil Mooney on 35 years in archiving.

> Interesting that he became the brand's storyteller-in-chief!

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Archivist Puts the History in Historical Drama “Boardwalk Empire” - By Virginia C McGuire, Library Journal

Archivist Puts the History in Historical Drama “Boardwalk Empire” - By Virginia C McGuire, Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Archivist Puts the History in Historical Drama “Boardwalk Empire”
- Library Journal

Archivist Heather Halpin Perez has become something of a celebrity since HBO's hit show about Prohibition-era Atlantic City, Boardwalk Empire, launched in 2010. But Perez, who manages the Alfred M. Heston Collection at the Atlantic City Free Public Library, says the work she does for the show is just another part of her job."
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Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians - recommendations for archives - review by Kate Theimer

Ithaka S+R’s Research Support Services for Scholars program has released the report of their NEH-funded study, Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians.

Here’s a brief description of the project from the report’s Executive Summary:

In 2011-2012, Ithaka S+R examined the changing research methods and practices of academic historians in the United States, with the objective of identifying services to better support them. Based on interviews with dozens of historians, librarians, archivists, and other support services providers, this project has found that the underlying research methods of many historians remain fairly recognizable even with the introduction of new tools and technologies, but the day to day research practices of all historians have changed fundamentally. Ithaka S+R researchers identified numerous opportunities for improved support and training, which are presented as recommendations to information services organizations including libraries and archives, history departments, scholarly societies, and funding agencies.

Link to report: http://www.sr.ithaka.org/news/understanding-historians-today-%E2%80%94-new-ithaka-sr-report
Karen du Toit's insight:

6 Recommendations for archives - Author feels that archivists would have predicted it! But worth checking out!

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Archivists and historians–Am I giving archivists too much credit? | ArchivesNext

RT @archivesnext: Thanks for the lively discussion on "Archivists and historians–Am I giving archivists too much credit?

 

"In case you’re not following me on Twitter, I’m nervously preparing to participate in my first annual meeting of the American Historical Association, where I’m part of a panel that will be discussing Processing the Past: Contesting Authority in History and the Archives by Francis X. Blouin, Jr. (Bentley Historical Library) and William Rosenberg (Univ. of Michigan). You can read more about Blouin and Rosenberg’s arguments in this interview.

 

I only have fifteen minutes or so to convey something I hope will be brilliant and provocative, so I’m planning to focus on the two concluding recommendations the book makes for archivists. The first concerns the perceived inability of archivists to understand the historical context of their records or the potential value of those records for researchers:

 

'Many archivists schooled in the technologies of information management may resist the idea, but the inherent historicity of all archives leads us to suggest that understanding the kinds of questions scholars might want to put to their documents may be as important as assessing their evidentiary and institutional value. Records in digital archives clearly have to be understood in these terms if they are to have some value beyond their current use, if they are to serve as future testimony to past processes and practices. . . . Moreover, archivists will only be able to maintain their important roles as reference counselors and curators if they have some understanding of the historical issues implicit in their materials. This will also help assure that their repositories remain at least partially connected to the needs and cultures of all their users . . . [211]' "

 

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