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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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The Ultimate Who-To-Follow Guide for Tweeting Librarians, Info Pros, and Educators - Ellyssa Kroski, OEDB.org

The Ultimate Who-To-Follow Guide for Tweeting Librarians, Info Pros, and Educators - Ellyssa Kroski, OEDB.org | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Wondering about who you should be following on Twitter to keep up with the steady stream of updates in Libraryland?  Well, here’s a list of lists!

This quick guide will give you 30 great lists of librarians, instructors, and information professionals that you’ll want to follow on Twitter as well as tweeting authors’ accounts and people and publications to follow to gain tech insights.  Check out each of these and start subscribing!!

Karen du Toit's insight:

Fantastic list!!

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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, October 5, 2013 1:21 PM

Great list!

Natural Health Library's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:48 AM

So much happening on Twitter in regards to libraries and innovation. Follow this list to be in the thick of it! R

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Tech E-book Roundup | Law Technology Today

Tech E-book Roundup | Law Technology Today | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"From mobile security to Facebook to iPad apps, LPM has an e-book to answer all your pressing technology questions. LPM e-books are available on the ABA Webstore (for reading on all your devices and readers) and the iBookstore or iTunes (for Apple devices).

 

Here’s a handy list of the latest tech e-books now available for download. Be sure to check them out–your law practice will thank you! (Next week, we’ll be discussing even more essential e-books from LPM.)"

 

> Technology and social media for lawyers!

>> Very handy to know about for law librarians!

 

1. iPad in One hour for lawyers (https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/ipad-in-one-hour-for-lawyers/id560206652?mt=11)

2. iPad apps in one hour for lawyers (http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/ipad-apps-in-one-hour-for/id521115322?mt=11)

3. Facebook in one hour for lawyers (https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/facebook-in-one-hour-for-lawyers/id564858548?mt=11)

4. LinkedIn in one hour for lawyers (http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/linkedin-in-one-hour-for-lawyers/id521113611?mt=11)

 


Via Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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How Open is it? Open Access Toolkit #openaccess #OA

"This guide will help you move beyond the seemingly
simple question, “Is this journal open access?” and toward
a more productive alternative, “How open is it?”
Use it to:
• Understand the components that define Open Access
• Learn what makes a journal more open vs. less open
• Make informed decisions about where to publish

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SilviaArano's comment, October 23, 2012 3:24 AM
Thanks for this!
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Author's Corner: An Excerpt from What Do Employers Want? - Hiring Librarians

Author's Corner: An Excerpt from What Do Employers Want? - Hiring Librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Priscilla Shontz and Richard Murray, the editors of LISCareer, a rich collection of articles written by practicing librarians on a variety of career development topics, are the authors of a new book entitled What Do Employers Want? A Guide for Library Science Students. Shontz and Murray cover topics such as Practical Experience, Professional Identity and How Employers Hire, basing their advice on interviews with people who hire librarians. The book moves beyond job search insights, outlining career development strategies for students and new graduates in a manner that is both funny and frank. I am pleased to be able to offer you an excerpt from chapter one: “What Do Employers Want?”

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Twitter for Librarians: The Ultimate Guide | College@Home

"Twitter for Librarians: The Ultimate Guide | College@Home: http://t.co/R6QZYRKN...

 

Here are all the resources you’ll need to make an informed decision on whether or not to become part of the growing number of Twitter users.

 

Ways To Use Twitter

Guides

Studies & articles

Tools & add-ons

 Libraries using Twitter"

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A Must Have App Evaluation Rubric

A Must Have App Evaluation Rubric | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"The choice of which apps to use with your students in the classroom is not an easy one. It ,in fact , calls for a lot of attention from the part of the teacher. You are responsible for your students learning and this responsibility grows riskier when learning becomes digitally based.This is particularly the case when integrating apps into your teaching."
Via Ove Christensen, Dr. Laura Sheneman
Karen du Toit's insight:

Valuable for librarians when asked or consulted about the use of apps in learning/teaching!

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Cristian Cerda's comment, December 8, 2012 8:32 PM
Interesting application, but the content has the same trouble that many of the rubric available on the web: It says nothing:
Ove Christensen's comment, December 9, 2012 6:38 AM
Well I think you should see it as a help for reflection on apps and use of apps. No tools are doing the hard work for you but they help you to remember what to cover.
Jim Lerman's comment, December 9, 2012 5:44 PM
@Cristian...I don't see it the same way. The criteria, in my opinion, do provide a useful framework for judging the efficacy of a web app. The value in the criteria is implicit; if one shares the values inherently stated in the criteria (for example, "authentic practice of targeted skills"), then I think the criteria are indeed helpful. If the values and meaning of the criteria do no speak to you, the reader, then I can see where one could feel they do not say anything. As Ove says, "no tools are doing the hard work for you."
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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Teacher-Librarians

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Teacher-Librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

>A great list of resources for all levels of librarians.

 

"Here's a megalist for my fellow media specialists/teacher-librarians. It's taken a while to gather all the information and I will continue to add to this page. Currently there are close to 185 sites listed. There is SO MUCH information out there! Please feel free to add your suggestions!"


Via Dr. Laura Sheneman
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Fair Use in Libraries - A Best Practice Guide

Fair Use in Libraries - A Best Practice Guide | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"...Hat tip to the people over at BoingBoing for linking to an excellent new resource for librarians, a Code of Best Practice in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries, developed by librarians under the aegis of the Association of Research Libraries.

The Code (its aims and objectives are discussed in greater length here) deals with frequently asked questions in higher education, such as:

When and how much copyrighted material can be digitized for student use? And should video be treated the same way as print? How can libraries’ special collections be made available online? Can libraries archive websites for the use of future students and scholars?

It’s a fascinating and very worthwhile resource, which is free to download here. We’d strongly recommend anyone with an interest in research librarianship, and/or issues in copyright take a look."

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A Guide to Ebook Purchasing | American Libraries Magazine

A Guide to Ebook Purchasing | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

American Libraries Magazine, the magazine of the American Library Association, delivers news and information about the library community.

 

"For anyone contemplating purchasing ebooks, asking why is the most important question. What are the primary goals of purchasing ebooks in your library or your consortium? Is it to expand the collection or to increase the buying power of a group of libraries? Is it to replace existing print collections, offer new services, or experiment with new business models in the hope of saving money? Whatever the reason, it is imperative to keep one’s goals in mind throughout the process.

Buying ebooks is a complicated process. To do it effectively is an even greater challenge due to the many ways to procure ebooks."

 

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