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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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6 trends on the horizon for academic and research libraries - eCampus News

6 trends on the horizon for academic and research libraries - eCampus News | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
NMC’s Horizon Report details trends, challenges, and technologies that are impacting—and will impact—academic and research libraries.

 

6 trends, 6 challenges and 6 developments!

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Great for the Future Library insights!

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More public libraries, their relevance at stake, see helping homeless people as a core mission

More public libraries, their relevance at stake, see helping homeless people as a core mission | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Article by: TRAVIS LOLLER , Associated Press 

libraries are more important than ever to people who can't otherwise get connected: Nearly two-thirds provide the only free computer and Internet access in their communities, according to the American Library Association.

In the 25 years since the ALA adopted a policy urging full access for poor and homeless library patrons, few have taken this mission as far as Nashville's main downtown library, where Bailey arrives early each day, standing on an icy sidewalk in below-freezing temperatures with a half-dozen other people until the ornate bronze doors open.

Once inside, he goes directly to the third floor, where rows of computer terminals are quickly occupied by people carrying bags filled with their worldly possessions.

The library recently renovated this section with their homeless patrons in mind, ditching countless shelves of bound copies of "Popular Mechanics" and other periodicals that are now available electronically, and making way for 68 computers and more tables with ethernet connections and power outlets."


...

 

"Librarians can't solve people's problems, but we can provide them the resources to solve their own problems," she said.

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Library empowering people!

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How Libraries are Advancing and Inspiring Schools and Communities - KQED (blog)

How Libraries are Advancing and Inspiring Schools and Communities - KQED (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries are experimenting with some exciting ways to inspire and engage the community by creating meeting and maker spaces with old technology and new

 

"...

a report just released by the Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries asks us again to reconsider how the library can serve communities in the 21st century. “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries” aims to “capture the momentum and excitement of the innovations taking place in public libraries across the country, and the impact these are having on communities,” said the group’s director, Amy Garmer. The report asks: With all the new technology and layered networks, what can be done beyond current advancements?

“We are a place for the curious, for creativity, a place for learning, a place to experiment. It’s always been the mission of the library. We’re just using different tools.”

The Dialogue on Public Libraries group is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Libraries Program and is made up of 34 library field leaders, business executives, government officials, education experts and community development visionaries. The group aims for more than just holding up great examples of libraries working well in the digital age.

“We want to provide a catalyst for new thinking about libraries as platforms for learning, creativity and innovation in their communities, and the creation of new networked forms of libraries,” Garmer said. If the report could spark engagement at the local, state and national levels to rethink how to use libraries and then constructively act on it, Garmer said, then the group’s goal will have been achieved."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great end-of-year question regenerate services for next year!

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Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen

Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In the wake of Amazon’s announcement of a new ebook subscription service, Forbes published an article by a British think tank employee with the link-bait title of “Close the Libraries and Buy Everyone An Amazon Kindle Unlimited Subscription”. As you might gather, the idea put forth was that supporting this licensing approach might be more cost effective for enabling the public’s access to content than the traditional public library in the United Kingdom. While that might not be the greatest idea, there is still much that scholarly publishers can learn from Amazon’s business strategy.

As a historical footnote, subscription based libraries were big in Britain during the 18th and 19th century when reasonably affluent individuals might pay for access to the latest three volume novel. (For some historical background on subscription based lending libraries, see here and here respectively). In the context of the Kindle Unlimited subscription, the reader pays Amazon $120 per year (or $119.88, if we’re being sticklers for accuracy) and gains access to as much as they want from a collection of about 600,000 titles. Critics have noted that these are not the high-end titles found in a first rate public or academic library; Amazon’s offering doesn’t include best-sellers, textbooks or scholarly monographs."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The controversial debate about the future of libraries vs subscription based ebook services. 

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Library of future ready to open in Colorado Springs - Colorado Springs Gazette

Library of future ready to open in Colorado Springs - Colorado Springs Gazette | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Robin Intemann:


"When Library 21c, the Pikes Peak Library District's newest facility, opens next month, patrons will see more than a repository for stacks of material.
Read more at http://gazette.com/library-of-future-ready-to-open-in-colorado-springs/article/1520530#6pl3RhroDIgVRloj.99

 

The facility on the city's north side will promote experiential learning with the latest in technology, access to 3-D printers, sewing machines and other tools, plus space - lots and lots of space.

Traditional resources, including books, audio and visual media and e-books, will endure.

It will replace the nearby Briargate Library, which closed Sunday so that materials could be moved to the new building before its June 21 opening. The district's administrative offices also have moved to the new facility.

As libraries emerge as places to create and interact, PPLD, through Library 21c, is anticipating demands and desires, officials said.

"This is cutting edge," said Dee Vazquez Sabol, PPLD community engagement and outreach officer. "We have been planning for the past five years so we weren't struggling to catch up."

Library 21c is the first of its kind in the country, Sabol said. Several libraries around the country have similar components, but none has so many features that patrons can use in one place."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Future Library!

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Poly Library to Be a Digital Resource, by Mary Toothman - The Ledger

Poly Library to Be a Digital Resource, by  Mary Toothman - The Ledger | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Mary Toothman

"Polytechnic University will be non-traditional in many ways, but one of the most dramatic alternatives to a typical university setting will be seen in the library. Or, rather, not seen.

When the university opens its doors to students this fall, the library will be almost completely online, although certain hardcover books will be available on an as-needed basis.

Kathryn Miller, director of library services for the school, said the challenge of setting up and planning library services for the polytechnic is a very different and exciting one for her profession, and she is enjoying it. Hired in late January at an annual salary of $95,000, she said it's not every day a librarian has the opportunity to be in on a start-up system like this one.

Her job is to develop and administer library resources and services to support the school's academic programs, faculty teaching and research, and student learning. She will manage budgeting, purchasing and policy development and work to ensure the university's vision aligns with that of the library."

Karen du Toit's insight:

University Library of the future!

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The Closing of British Libraries - by Annoyed Librarian, Library Journal (blog)

"[...] the British situation seems to be getting even worse.

According to this column arguing for libraries as public spaces that don’t need to make a profit for someone, “it is estimated that cuts to local authorities will force 100 libraries to close by the end of 2015, with another 200-300 becoming reliant on volunteers.”

If we extrapolated that to the population size of the United States, that would be like 600 libraries possibly closing and 1200-1500 becoming reliant on volunteers. Something like that already seems to be happening with school libraries, but public libraries haven’t faced anything like this sort of devastation.

The column argues that it’s ideology that’s crushing the libraries, not any sort of budget issue, since Britain has plenty of money compared to most countries and it’s not in state of total war or anything.

The idea that there might be some worth in a public space that does not make a profit for someone or other is baffling to our ministers. It’s almost ideologically offensive. It undermines the whole philosophy behind the transformation of Britain over the past 30 or so years, where everything and everyone must justify themselves in economic terms.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Very sad scenario!

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Your Library Wants You to Make Some Noise! - Susan Kent

Your Library Wants You to Make Some Noise! - Susan Kent | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

BY SUSAN KENT:

“Does anyone go to libraries anymore?” A mayor, the president of a major foundation, a corporate executive, and several newspaper reporters have asked me that question.[...]

 

 

My answer to this question is a resounding, “Of course!” When I walk into almost any public library in any city—from my neighborhood branch in L.A. to Buffalo, New York—I see toddlers with their moms or dads, waiting for story time to begin. After school lets out, I see elementary school-age children working together on homework assignments and creating web-based reports. I see teens congregating in small groups to record digital music and videos. I see people being tutored in literacy and English or gathering for events. I overhear book club members engaged in conversation.

I was a librarian for more than 40 years and served as the director of the Los Angeles Public Library, the Minneapolis Public Library, and as the chief executive of the branch libraries of the New York Public Library. Now, I consult with libraries in the U.S. and beyond about their roles and strategies for the future."


Via Miguel Mimoso Correia
Karen du Toit's insight:

Advocacy for the public library!

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Libraries & the Big Picture: Facts, Trends, & Next! - The Pew Internet and American Life Project

The Pew Research Center’s next report on public libraries in the digital age is being released in March—an in-depth analysis of library users' and non-users’ habits and attitudes. Research Associate Kathryn Zickuhr explains the findings and their implications for libraries as they plan for the future.

The International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) recently talked to key players (including Pew Internet Director Lee Rainie) in the information and technology industries and came up with key trends. Hear about the report as well as other trends our industry watchers see things we need to pay attention to as we plan for our communities in the future.

Includes discussion time with colleagues about what they see as well and what it means for libraries and their strategies going forward.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Looking forward to the report!

The future of libraries!

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Rubbish, Tech, Makerspace, Hackerspace: Maker culture has arrived in Danish libraries

Rubbish, Tech, Makerspace, Hackerspace: Maker culture has arrived in Danish libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Louise OvergaardTeam leader, Aarhus Main Library

"Euro pallets packed to the rim with used go-cart tires, defunct computer components, washing machine drums and ancient electric domestic devices – not to mention chipped tableware and vases – this is what awaits visitors entering the Main Library of Aarhus.

Some of the visitors don’t seem to register this atypical library deposit, a few are offended, but most are curious and want to explore the space. Some visitors take up painting old porcelain, converting empty beer cans into candlesticks, or sewing pencil cases from tattered banners. Others, more daringly, set to work dissecting devices with hammers and electric drills, reassembling the refuse into their own inventions and designs.

This is Skrotlab!, or Wastelab! to use its English name. October 2013 was all about waste materials, sustainability, and recycling. Users, along with library staff, got busy repairing, recreating, modifying, and developing the rubbish. There were also lectures, waste dates, repair cafès, basketweaving workshops, ethnographic workshops, and a variety of other maker-cultural activities."


Via Doug Mirams
Karen du Toit's insight:

Future libraries!

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Doug Mirams's curator insight, January 20, 2014 9:33 AM

Last October, upcycling came to the Aarhus Main Library with its Wastelab, or Skrotlab!
via @myleejoseph

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Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District)

Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Michelle Cingrani 

 

"The Arapahoe (Colorado) Library District (ALD) is making difficult-to-access technology available for patrons – like Google Glass, 3D printing, and The Studio, which is a state-of-the-art soundproof library space featuring a green screen and everything needed to create a masterpiece – including iMacs with Adobe Creative Cloud, iMovie, GarageBand, high-definition video cameras, a guitar, a keyboard, and more.  

“ALD is redefining libraries as warehouses of information to evolving centers where patrons can experience and use cutting-edge technology,” said ALD Executive Director Nicolle Davies. “Libraries are portals to the latest information – and offering access to technology is the newest version of that role.”

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future libraries!

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A New Year’s Vision of Libraries as Bookstores - Jamie Larue discussion | American Libraries Magazine

A New Year’s Vision of Libraries as Bookstores - Jamie Larue discussion | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
@ALALibrary asks whether libraries can and/or will make the transition to becoming ebook-sellers. Thoughts? http://t.co/IBMb0KxPew

 

"Beth Bacon, vice president of content management at Seattle publishing platform Booktrope, posted a piece December 30, 2013, on the idea of libraries as ebookstores. On the surface, there is much to commend it. Many bookstores have closed, and the more than 15,000 public libraries in the United States—more, ALA tells us (PDF file), than there are McDonald's in the country—would seem to provide a nationwide network of distribution, already established, already trusted."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Jamie Larue asks about the potential benefits and pitfalls to the library?

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What to expect from libraries in the 21st century: Pam Sandlian Smith at TEDxMileHigh - YouTube

"Why do we still need libraries in the age of digital, real-time information? In this emotional talk, Pam Sandlian Smith shows how she works to use the library as a hub for community-based knowledge creation and discourse."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great talk about the relevance of libraries!

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Library 2.015 Spring Summit

Library 2.015 Spring Summit | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Emerging Future: Technology and Learning
Join us on April 30th, 2015 for the Library 2.015 Spring Summit - 

...the Library 2.015 Spring Summit - The Emerging Future: Technology and Learning, a half-day conversation about technology issues and trends in the future of library and information services.  The Spring Summit will be held from 12pm - 3pm US Pacific / 3pm - 6pm US Eastern, and is designed to complement the fifth annualLibrary 2.015 Worldwide Virtual Conference on October 20th, 2015.  Facebook | Twitter | Google+ 

The technology landscape changes rapidly, and these changes have economic, social, and ethical significance for individuals, organizations, and the entire world. The Emerging Future: Technology and Learning brings focus to the planning skills that are needed, the issues that are involved, and the current trends as we explore the potential impact of technological innovations.

 

RSVP here:L http://www.eventbrite.com/e/library-2015-spring-summit-tickets-15818355126?ref=ebtn

Karen du Toit's insight:

Worth signing up for!

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Building libraries of the distant future today, Drew Brookhart - Columbus Telegram

Building libraries of the distant future today, Drew Brookhart - Columbus Telegram | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
It is exciting to feel energy build around a library and cultural arts center in downtown Columbus. The Columbus City Council has had their support galvanized by grant money coming

 

"So when you think of a library in 100, 300, or 500 years, imagine a beautiful building with spaces for discussion, contemplation and creation where wisdom can be shared. Imagine skilled librarians making sure that everyone has access to organized, meaningful resources that raise the level of public discussion above the din of the internet. Imagine all that topped off with a collection of the best hardbacks available."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Contemplative article about the "future Library"!

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Try Your Local Library Instead of a Coffee Shop to Get Work Done - Dave Greenbaum

Try Your Local Library Instead of a Coffee Shop to Get Work Done - Dave Greenbaum | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
When you think of a library, most people think of a quiet place to study. If you want to get work done and spread out, you go to a coffee shop. Newer libraries offer the same amenities as coffee shops, and sometimes even more.

 

Read more:

http://www.fastcompany.com/3034143/the-public-library-wants-to-be-your-office

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

The library of the future! Definitely

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The top technologies every librarian needs to know - ed. Kenneth Varnum / @facetpublishing

The top technologies every librarian needs to know - ed. Kenneth Varnum / @facetpublishing | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The Top Technologies Every Librarian Needs to Know: titles from @facetpublishing http://t.co/PJLGk8JSNB

 

Edited by Kenneth J Varnum

In this much needed book, Kenneth Varnum and his hand-picked team of contributors look ahead over the most important technologies likely to impact library services over the next five years. It shows librarians where to invest time and money to receive the greatest benefits. Their ideas will stimulate strategic thinking and help library staff make informed decisions about meeting user expectations and delivering services.

Highly informative for any library, the diverse chapters include: 

Impetus to Innovate: Convergence and Library Trends Hands-Free Augmented RealityImpacting the Library FutureLibraries and Archives Augmenting the WorldThe Future of Cloud-Based Library SystemsLibrary DiscoveryWeb Services as the New Websites for Many LibrariesText Mining Bigger, Better, Together: Building the Digital Library of the FutureOpen Hardware in Libraries.

This leading edge collection offers an expert-level view of library technology that’s just around the corner and is essential reading for systems librarians, students and all librarians who are looking to the technology future.

July 2014; 144pp; paperback; 978-1-78330-033-4; £49.95

 

Find out more: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=0334&utm_source=Communicator_facet_mailing_list&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=Varnum2&utm_campaign=The+top+technologies+every+librarian+needs+to+know&_ccCt=GqCK7eRmX931soBq1T0BNg_hUSnDuKhXE76qaN2plZUIBOeDaCj9bEVRsmNE3ff9

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future of libraries!

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