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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Fixity Version 0.5, the free and open source fixity tool developed by AVPreserve, has been officially released for download

Fixity Version 0.5, the free and open source fixity tool developed by AVPreserve, has been officially released for download | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Chris Lacinak
AVPreserve

About Fixity:

Fixity creates a manifest of files stored in directories identified by the user, documenting file names, locations, and checksums. The user can then schedule regular automated scans of the directories to monitor for any changes to files. Fixity is ideal for monitoring of files in long term storage, complimenting tools such as Bagger and the BagIt specification that can be used to check fixity at points of transition.

 

Major recent updates include:

•           Created OSX version (64-bit systems only)

•           Added support for MD5 in addition to the SHA256 checksum algorithm

•           Added ability to change checksum algorithm for a project

•           Added ability to import projects between versions of Fixity

•           Added ability to update the location of a scanned directory

•           Implemented SQLite database for storing projects

•           Improved reporting

•           Updated logic for reporting on copied and moved files

•           Improved handling of special characters in file paths

•           Added history directory to store snapshots of the manifest over time

•           Create tasks as Administrator on Windows, allowing projects to run when logged off.

•           Code, stability and interface improvements

Karen du Toit's insight:

The user guide also available

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British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats, by Simon Sharwood

British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats, by Simon Sharwood | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @dhgermany: British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats http://t.co/mKz4Qhyk via @regvulture...

 

By Simon Sharwood, APAC Editor 


"File formats and the software capable of reading them are living longer than previously thought, according to a British Library and UK Web Archive study.

Formats over Time: Exploring UK Web History (PDF, slides as PDF) considers 2.5 billion files author Andrew N Jackson retrieved with the help of the Internet Archive and the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC). All the files come from “the UK web domain” and come from the period between 1996 and 2010."

 

"Our initial analysis supports Rosenthal's position; that most formats last much longer than five years, that network effects to appear to stabilise formats, and that new formats appear at a modest, manageable rate.

But he also warns that “a number of formats and versions that are fading from use, and these should be studied closely in order to understand the process of obsolescence.” ®"

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Paper vs. Electronic: The Not-So-Final Battle - by Jennifer Wright

Paper vs. Electronic: The Not-So-Final Battle - by Jennifer Wright | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

A common inquiry I receive from Smithsonian staff is whether it is better to keep their files in electronic or paper format.  The best answer to this question is "it depends."  There are several factors to consider.
1)      How long do the files need to be kept?

2)       Does one format have more value than the other?

3)      Is one format easier to use?

4)      In what format are the majority of the records already?

 

Photo: Jeanne Benas, by Strauss, Richard, 1990, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 90-877-11A.

Karen du Toit's insight:

The right questions to ask when deciding about keeping records or archives

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