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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Content Curation: Beyond the Institutional Repository and Library Archives - Crystal Renfro

Content Curation: Beyond the Institutional Repository and Library Archives - Crystal Renfro | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Crystal Renfro:

"If you are an academic librarian, you have been hearing about Data Curation, Content Curation, Information Curation or Digital Curation for years. And the terms can be applied in several different ways. There are the curation activities surrounding purchased library materials and the curation of faculty and student items (like theses and dissertations for example). Archivists have been intimately involved with all sorts of curation activities since archives existed, and were early adopters of digital curation and finding aids for the items they maintained. Most recently, Data Curation has been in the forefront of librarian discussions in response to government mandates to make research information widely available; first with the medical field, and more recently with the National Science Foundation requirements for data curation plans in all NSF grants."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Curation for librarians and archivists explained!

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From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge

From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China. (...) - by Adrian Giordani, MyScienceWork blog, 27 november 2012


Via Julien Hering, PhD, Pavlinka Kovatcheva
Karen du Toit's insight:

"Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China.

This article was originally published in International Science Grid This Week as “Enabling knowledge creation in data-driven science”
http://www.isgtw.org/feature/enabling-knowledge-creation-data-driven-science

[...]

 

"To answer this problem [of data deluge], some are creating infrastructures and software that are set to radically transform the way scientific publishing is done, which has been little changed for centuries.

Research publishing 2.0

While a number of scientific institutes, European Commission-funded projects, and research communities work on establishing common data policies and open-access infrastructures to make research data more searchable, shareable, and citable, the life sciences are looking at data analysis and publishing approaches that move the computer to the data rather than moving the data to the computers"

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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Extremely valuable skills for Infrmation Professionals of the future:

 

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf 

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf  


Via Robin Good, janlgordon
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Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 7:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 7:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 4, 2014 2:34 AM

Curating Information and Data Sense-Making Is The Key Skill for the Future [Research]

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Humanrithm: why data without people is not enough

Slides of talk at DataWeek 2012 by Guillaume Decugis, Co-Founder & CEO of Scoop.it.
From introduction of presentation:
"We engineers love data and algorithms. They help create amazing things. But if and when we forget that people create data and that data can be improved by people, we will miss the promise of Big Data. It's time we all thought of this not as social vs algorithm but as humanrithm."
"Curation starts when Saerch stops working" - Clay Shirky

View full presentation here:
http://www.slideshare.net/guillaumedecugis/humanrithm-why-data-without-people-is-not-enough
Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Alessio Manca's comment, November 30, 2012 8:02 AM
Impacting! TY
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2012 top ten trends in academic libraries

A review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee

"Three leaders in academic librarianship were the catalysts for this discussion: Martin Halbert, dean of libraries at University of North Texas; Joan Lippincott, associate director of Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), and Mark Puente, director of diversity and leadership programs, Association of Research Libraries (ARL). This discussion forum augmented the trends identified by the committee.

These top trends are listed alphabetically. Each trend includes a brief discussion and references to the literature. The committee also compiled additional resources that may be of interest."

 

- "Communication value

- Data curation

- Digital preservation

- Higher education

- Information technology

- Mobile environments

- Patron driven e-book acquisition

- Scholarly communication

- Staffing

- User behaviours and expectations"

 

The committee would like to thank Erin Hood, research assistant at OCLC Research, for her assistance in producing this document."

 

   
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More Technology for the Rest of Us: A Second Primer on Computing for the Non-IT Librarian

More Technology for the Rest of Us: A Second Primer on Computing for the Non-IT Librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

More Technology for the Rest of Us: A Second Primer on Computing for the Non-IT Librarian From cloud computing to data curation to open-source software, the world of technology offers great opportunity—and potential frustration.

 

"Nancy Courtney and her team of IT experts have set out to enhance the former and alleviate the latter. More Technology for the Rest of Us: A Second Primer on Computing for the Non-IT Librarian follows up on Courtney's 2005 technology volume by tackling the most recent advances in IT. Each chapter describes a technology important to the library field..."

 

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