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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Indigenous Libraries As Social Venues · Global Voices

Indigenous Libraries As Social Venues · Global Voices | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

“One thing is that books satisfy users’ curiosity, and a very different one that is that it might represent the identity of the community them belong to”. Argentinian librarian Daniel Canosa questions the role and function of local libraries. On Infotecarios network he writes:

"Indigneous libraries [should] generate knowledge from local and community participation, provide a way of understanding, that in time is a way of building identity. The thing is if what libraries provide represent what each community knows, if what a librarian builds with their community allows a true affinity with people's historic memory. This is not about new ideas, but things should move forward questioning those ideas.
[...]
If libraries spread people's production from their own places, then not only the elites won't be then only ones in the world of information." (translation)

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries as builders and keepers of identity of a community!

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What 21st-century libraries can learn from this 19th-century institution, Angela Tung

What 21st-century libraries can learn from this 19th-century institution, Angela Tung | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Like most library students, I learned about the Dewey Decimal System, the Library of Congress, and the father of the American public library, Andrew Carnegie. But I also learned about the necessary transformation of the library in the 21st century. In order to survive, it was hammered into our brains again and again, a library has to be more than just a “brick and mortar” receptacle of books. It needs to be a technical hub, a community center, a place you might go instead of Starbuck’s."

[...]

Hull House offered a variety of services that seem like precursors to the services that libraries are providing today. Like the Arizona libraries that have added public health nurses, Addams and her Hull House co-founder Ellen Gates Starr “volunteered as on-call doctors when the real doctors either didn’t show up or weren’t available.” They also “acted as midwives, saved babies from neglect, prepared the dead for burial, nursed the sick, and sheltered domestic violence victims.”

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Volunteers “held classes in literature, history, art, domestic activities (such as sewing),” and practical courses such as bookbinding, “which was timely—given the employment opportunities in the growing printing trade,” which sounds a lot like the free computer classes offered by many public libraries today."

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Via Trudy Raymakers
Karen du Toit's insight:

Thoughts around the Hull House which rendered a variety of community services, the same as expected from a public library today!

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Rebranding Removes the Term Library, by Dr Steve Matthews

Rebranding Removes the Term Library, by Dr Steve Matthews | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"At the risk of sounding like I’m bragging, I knew this was coming when I wrote The Revolutionary Library in April of 2011, and again in August with The Physics of Your Library Brand. I just didn’t know where it would break out or exactly when.

A library no more . . . Idea Exchange is born. Library rebranding is underway in Cambridge according to the Cambridge Times reporter Bill Jackson in his article last Thursday, February 20. The Cambridge Public Library – Art Gallery • Library • Community Center – in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada was established in 1973 by combining the separate libraries of Galt, Preston and Hespeler with a history over 100 years at that time. In 1992 renovation and expansion of the Library & Gallery in Galt included new space to house a climate controlled art gallery, a studio and greatly enlarged children’s facilities. Additional expansions over the years have created the multipurpose entity that exists today.:


Via Dr. Steve Matthews
Karen du Toit's insight:

Future libraries!

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Karen du Toit's comment, February 28, 4:05 AM
Changing the name to incorporate all the new functions /spaces/services the "library" offers! To get past the stereotypical idea of a "library" with only books and a quiet place of study!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 1, 5:19 AM
Rebranding Removes the Term Library
LibrarianLand's curator insight, March 1, 6:37 PM

This is really b.s. The term library and it associations are still very important and vital to the institution in most of its forms. "Digital Idea Space" or "Ideal Village"  or "You can make it happen here!" or what ever the heck you want to rebrand it does not convey the wonderful history and values that make libraries great and sound trendy and hollow.

 

I agree that libraries need to be marketed better and often times differently but just as importantly they need to hire and retain the best and brightest who will actively provide and support the creation of new knowledge. A trendy new name that obliterates a very powerful concept in many folks' minds, LIBRARY, does not do the history or values of the idea justice. Perhaps a hybrid name that involves both is OK, like "Library Resource Center" or "Digital Learning Library" or even a name that does not include the word but clearly markets the traditional values of intellectual freedom, equity, learning, and yes, still preserving and collecting traditional things like books.

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Bringing Yoga to Public Libraries - Christa Avampato

Bringing Yoga to Public Libraries - Christa Avampato | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Bringing Yoga to Public Libraries - The Huffington Post (RT @yoga: Inspiring interview with Christa Avampato (@christanyc), on bringing yoga to the public via libraries: http://t.co/wmEzKFqA52)...

 

This is an interview with Christa Avampato, who started a yoga program in 2005 at the Darden School at UVA (where she received an MBA degree). Not surprisingly, many of her classmates were under a lot of stress, so she began teaching a free weekly class at the school. In 2009 her apartment building caught fire; she lost nearly all of her belongings, and almost lost her life. Her yoga practice, coupled with therapy, helped her to heal from the resulting PTSD. She wanted to share that with others who need healing.

Living in New York City, she saw so many people who need the healing power of yoga and can't attend studio classes for a variety of reasons, teachers who want to teach and don't know how to get started, and spaces such as the New York Public Library that are under-utilized. Christa started Compass Yoga to create a bridge between the people who need yoga and don't have a means to access it, teachers who want to give their time and talents, and spaces that might house these connections.

Her one weekly class at the local New York Public Library branch two years ago has expanded to 12 weekly classes at five different NYPL branches and two senior centers. All of these classes are free and open to the public; they draw an average of 25 students to every class. 

Karen du Toit's insight:

One of the great services that can be done for the community in a public library! Love it!

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How to put libraries back at the heart of communities, by Brian Ashley - The Guardian

How to put libraries back at the heart of communities, by Brian Ashley - The Guardian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it


"Libraries have long been social gathering centres and provided sources of information for local communities.

But how is this role changing with the financial landscape and changes in the way we consume information?

We published a report recently called Envisioning the Library of the Future. In just over a year, and after speaking to more than 800 people, we have a piece of research that demonstrates the vital role that libraries can play in the success and wellbeing of the communities they serve.

Writing this report was important to us because we wanted to bring the research in this area up to date.

[...]

We always hoped that Envisioning the Library of the Future would energise the sector, looking beyond the immediate and important issues of funding and library closures towards formulating an approach that will ensure that libraries are seen as vital and relevant long into the future.

In the coming months and years, the aim is to see libraries at the heart of communities, helping us to understand ourselves, our place in the world, and the heritage of the communities in which we live."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Visions for libraries of the future! 

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Parents feel special bond with libraries and what they offer to children, families | Deseret News

Parents feel special bond with libraries and what they offer to children, families | Deseret News | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Lois M. Collins:

Parents value libraries as a safe place for children, a source of education and entertainment, a tech hub. They feel great affection for a library's ability to instill a love of reading in young minds, too, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life project.

In fact, 94 percent of parents say libraries are important for their children and 79 percent say "very important," according to the survey of 2,252 Americans 16 and older conducted last fall, including 584 interviews with parents of minor children. "Parents" in the results refers only to those children younger than 18.

The survey found that among all adults, parents are more likely to have library cards, visit the library, use the library website and participate in programs there, said Lee Rainie, who directs the Internet and American Life Project for Pew.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries are truly community spaces for families!

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Are social enterprises the future for libraries? - Tim Smedley on The Guardian Professional

Are social enterprises the future for libraries? - Tim Smedley on The Guardian Professional | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Public sector cuts have led to a rise in the number of social enterprises running library services, but sustainability is a problem

 

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Social enterprises are, however, offering much more than books and computer access – the mixed-use community hub, argues Dunn, is the library model for the next 30 years: "We're open longer now than when the local council ran the libraries. I really believe that there's a wider range of services that we offer from our libraries now... There are things that the local council do well, no question. But they are unable to move quickly and introduce new services quickly when the community asks for it." The reason why social enterprises can, he says, "is that we are the local community – there is no them and us."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Social enterprises are the future of libraries! Definitely!!

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Engaging Our Communities | American Libraries Magazine

Engaging Our Communities | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Laurie D. Borman:

If I were predicting a library theme for 2013, it would be community engagement. Libraries and librarians are looking for ways to better serve the needs of their local populations, whether that community is a city, a campus, or a school. TheJanuary/February issue of American Libraries reflects part of that broad spectrum of engagement efforts. For example, we found that libraries across the country are scaling back the stacks and even putting trailers in parking lots to make room for makerspaces.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Community engagement at libraries - reflected in articles from American Libraries Magazine

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Libraries in Brimbank have a constructive program

Libraries in Brimbank have a constructive program | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Brimbank libraries have a range of children programs available to encourage social interaction, learning and fun with the Lego Club being one of them.

Aimed at children aged 7-12 years who would like to build and display their Lego works in the library, the free club runs weekly at the Sunshine and Sydenham libraries.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great idea!

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Make our libraries accessible, public and inspiring

Make our libraries accessible, public and inspiring | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
SmartPlanet's C.C. Sullivan looks at libraries across the country to assess the new scheme for the New York Public Library by Foster and Partner.

 

The scheme, first reported today by Robin Pogrebin at The New York Times, reinvents the library’s closed-off, seven-floor stacks as “a major new contemporary library within Carrère & Hastings’s neo-Classical one.” Tall windows will open to Bryant Park in a soaring new atrium, reached by a grand circulation zone opening through the middle of the building.

The original designs notoriously offered to relocate all the stacks’ books to an inaccessible warehouse in New Jersey. Yet the new plan still decimates the collection, hauling away 25% of the books that are now within the community’s reach.


Via Doug Mirams
Karen du Toit's insight:

Use of space in the public library > inspiring!

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Doug Mirams's curator insight, December 20, 2012 12:36 PM

Talks about how library plans have got it right in the past and discusses the new plans at New York Public Library.

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Teenagers, libraries, digital media, and learning | Reading, Writing, Research, by @dmguion

Teenagers, libraries, digital media, and learning | Reading, Writing, Research, by @dmguion | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries are beginning to design special spaces where teens paired with mentors use various digital media for learning and creativity.
Karen du Toit's insight:

"In November 2011, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, along with the Institute of Museum and Library Services, made grants of $100,000 to twelve museums and libraries across the country to develop digital learning laboratories for teenagers. They will announce another round of grants in November 2012.

Chicago Public Library’s YOUmedia

Chicago Public Library’s YOUmedia inspired the grant program. It is a special space where teenagers can use equipment provided by the library to create the same sorts of media that they consume. Creativity requires the development of certain skills.

Digital creativity, of course, requires digital skills. But creativity has always required a variety of intellectual, social, and emotional disciplines. The electronic age has not changed that fact at all.

It doesn’t work to plan a new program for a particular constituency and then dictate how it has to work. Development of YOUmedia has required some cultural adjustments. The YOUmedia space cannot enforce traditional library rules about food and noise levels and at the same time maintain a vibrant community of teenagers.

The entire concept of YOUmedia also requires access to and participation of the entire library to make it work. It is not a place for segregating either teenagers or their interests and learning style.

Sooner or later, the library will shape the teenagers’ behavior, but the teenagers will shape the library’s culture at least as much. That will result in short term discomfort and long term continued relevancy for the library as a whole.

Over the years, YOUmedia has started numerous separate projects. Some of them have continued for quite a while. The center has issued a literary magazine for a year and a half and a gaming podcast for three years. The longest-lasting programs have all come from the teenagers’ initiative, not from the library staff."

 

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Creating Communities Through Makerspaces by Buffy Hamilton / Atlanta Mini Maker Faire 2012

Creating Communities Through Libraries and Makerspaces Presented by Buffy J. Hamilton, The Unquiet Librarian 


Via Buffy J. Hamilton
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The Case For Keeping Libraries Alive

The Case For Keeping Libraries Alive | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Ariel Schwartz:

"It’s not about checking out more books. An initiative is focusing on libraries around the world as centers of social and economic change, as well as centers to help the most disadvantaged citizens."


Via Trudy Raymakers
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The Public Library Wants To Be Your Office, by Anita Hamilton

The Public Library Wants To Be Your Office, by Anita Hamilton | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"D.C. Public Library president Richard Reyes-Gavilán defends libraries’ growing role as business incubators, despite their tenuous connection to books, literacy, and information access. “Libraries have always been a place for personal betterment. We are providing a space for people to get a leg up on their lives, whether that’s someone running their own business or getting their library card for the first time so they’re better able to tackle first grade.”

Adds NYPL President Marx, “libraries should be providing free access to information and physical space to engage in the life of the mind whether it is a new business idea or thinking up a new novel.” It’s a nice idea. But as demonstrated by the failed plan to gut the stacks at the crown jewel of the New York Public Library system, trying to accommodate everyone in a finite space is just begging for a turf war."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The case of the library as office space! Definitely the library of the future! There should be a work-around between the library loyalists and the library as community space enthusiasts!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 12, 12:49 AM

Libraries are becoming de-facto business incubators, and a few are actively targeting that market.

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Libraries invite artists and musicians to move in upstairs - Brooklyn Public Library

Libraries invite artists and musicians to move in upstairs - Brooklyn Public Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Bands and painters will soon be able to get their artistic groove on above the stacks at libraries in Williamsburg and Red Hook.

Spaceworks, an organization tasked with using taxpayer money to create art spaces around the city, plans to build practice and studio spaces in the Williamsburg and Red Hook branches of the Brooklyn Public Library. Taking over the public space for private use is the perfect way to provide much-needed cheap digs to creative types, an organizer said.

“We were created to address the issue of affordability for artists,” said Spaceworks executive director Paul Parkhill. “We are looking to do projects that are 15 or 20 years at least to make sure they are stabilizing forces in the community.”

Karen du Toit's insight:

The use of library spaces - future of libraries!

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Shhh…! Silence in the RSA Library – what do you think? : RSA blogs

Shhh…! Silence in the RSA Library – what do you think? : RSA blogs | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

he role of the library has evolved significantly. Once used exclusively for quiet reading and self-study, it is now a community space where people go for computer courses, children’s story times and even a cup of tea. A spokesperson for Blackheath Library in Greenwich comments:

‘”Libraries are places for everyone to use and enjoy. They’re our community centres, information hubs, spaces to learn or think and make ourselves feel better. We want to ensure libraries are developed in a way that means they stay at the heart of the community.”

As libraries evolve from silent self-study areas to community hubs, should we still be expected to be quiet whilst using them? Opinions differ! For instance, one of us was recently taken to task by a user of the RSA Library for being too noisy while dealing with a query from a Fellow. This made us reflect on our policy – or lack thereof – on users maintaining silence whilst working within it.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Silence in the library should be reconsidered since it changed to community hubs! Maybe there should still be designated quiet areas for study?

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A library is not just about books: it's also a place for the vulnerable

A library is not just about books: it's also a place for the vulnerable | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Angela Clarke: If another 400 UK libraries close by 2016, as predicted, the true loss to society will be even greater than we realise

 

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"My own fragility revealed that a library is not just a reference service: it is also a place for the vulnerable. From the elderly gentleman whose only remaining human interaction is with library staff, to the isolated young mother who relishes the support and friendship that grows from a Baby Rhyme Time session, to a slow moving 30-something woman collecting her CDs, libraries are a haven in a world where community services are being ground down to nothing. I've always known libraries are vital, but now I understand that their worth cannot be measured in books alone."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The library, a place without judgement, open to anyone and their needs! 

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Libraries must remain community hubs despite technological change > report says > LocalGov.co.uk

Libraries must remain community hubs despite technological change, report says http://t.co/64d7kM38Ys

 

Jonathan Werran

Public libraries will have to cope with technological advances yet remain the hubs of community life, Arts Council England has reported today.

In a major research project entitled ‘Envisioning the library of the future’, the quango sets out four priority areas for development; placing the library as the hub of the community; fully exploiting digital technology; ensuring libraries are resilient and ensuring librarians have the right skills.

Alan Davey, Chief Executive, Arts Council England said. ‘Envisioning the library of the future has shown us that collaboration is key.

‘If everyone with an interest in and passion for libraries works effectively together, we can help the sector to develop and respond to the challenges and opportunities that are presenting themselves,’ Mr Davey added.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries of the future > community hubs!

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Silence is not so golden in the modern library

Silence is not so golden in the modern library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Catherine Armitage:

The State Librarian of NSW, Alex Byrne, says librarians no longer expect or want libraries to be places of quiet solitude. Rather than walking around saying ''shhh'' and waving their steel rulers to enforce silence, he said contemporary librarians understand that ''using information, learning and reading are not just solitary activities''.

''We have quiet places in the library for people who want to concentrate but we don't insist on quiet libraries. That is because we realise it is a social activity'', Dr Byrne said. In navigating the complex new wor