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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Five minutes with the College Archivist « Royal Holloway Library Blog

RT @RHUL_Library: What does an Archivist actually do? Find out here http://t.co/NeKKq0uFiC #LibraryLoves #Archives #explorearchives

 

Annabel Gill is the College Archivst for RHUL and is based in Founder's library. Fin out more about our collections at www.rhul.ac.uk/archives

Karen du Toit's insight:

The work of a college archivist!

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Librarians give old books new life when space becomes scarce - The Collegian

Librarians give old books new life when space becomes scarce - The Collegian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
When library books age, it's up to the librarians to save them — or artists, in some cases. By Kirsten Mahon/nw/multimedia editor To avoid destroying library books deemed old, SE Campus librarian Lillian Cano constructed a wall of books with colors arranged in a rainbow. Photo by Taurence Williams/The Collegian When library books age, it’s up to the librarians to save them — or artists, in some cases. NE library director Mark Dolive has trouble letting books “get chewed up” when it’s time to weed out the dusty novels. “When you buy new books, you may have to get rid of books,” he said. Libraries have limited space, so the process of elimination is complicated. Librarians rely on content, age and relevance to determine which books need the “chew” and which ones get to stay. Historical books normally stay longer while health, science and technology textbooks must be consistently replaced, Dolive said. “Technology can go out of date,” he said. “For health programs, it’s no more than five years.”
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A very creative use of old books
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Collection Visualisation | Blog post | UTS Library

Collection Visualisation | Blog post | UTS Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Posted by Mal in 

University Librarian: 

"This post is a collection of examples that relate to the visualisation of collections.

Several researchers are doing some interesting work in this space and I think it is pretty important. Adding some kind of visual layer to catalogues, search or discovery tools provides us with a capabilty that is largely missing in the cultural sector at present. Most searches focus solely on text-based initiators or they provide text-based lists of search results. Open data, the encouragement to collaborate in coding and the need to either search visually or to visualise search results is leading towards much improved collection discovery. This makes the collections we provide more easily found, used, explored, enjoyed, linked and shared."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting concept of visualization collections in libraries!

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Archivists and the power they have, #quote by Nare Monyai | via @SABCRadioArc #archives #archivists

Archivists and the power they have, #quote by Nare Monyai | via @SABCRadioArc #archives #archivists | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
SABC Radio Archives wrote: Archivists and the power they have!

 

News & Actuality Archivist Nare Monyai: " #Archivists wield substantial power over records in the way they select, appraise and shape the collections they work with which is fundamental to how experiences, narratives and memory are structured."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Archivists and the power they wield over their collections!

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Exploratory Design for Curated Collections: Empowering Spatial, Experiential Interaction Through Information Landscapes

Exploratory Design for Curated Collections: Empowering Spatial, Experiential Interaction Through Information Landscapes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Robin Good:

"Tim Wray explores the new frontiers of curated collections (from a museum perspective), and in doing so, he analyzes the concept of "landscapes", a possible emerging metaphor for how large sets of relevant information items could be better organized for viewing, even outside the specific museum setting.

 

His goal in doing this is one of finding out how to build effective interfaces that reveal and unravel narratives within collections. How can that be designed into the collection?

 

Tim Wray is particularly interested in this research, because he is also the brain behind a new and upcoming app called A Place for Art, and which has likely lots to do with art exploration and discovery.

 

The key point he makes in this interesting article (part of a longer series) is the illustration of the two concepts of "containers" and "landscapes", and about how they closely relate to the organization and access of curated collections.

 

In Tim Wray's view, the future, especially when we look at large collections, is in the increased adoption of "landscapes" organizing approaches versus the ever-present "container" approach we use for most collections today.

 

He writes: "I hint at the necessary shift from the former to the latter as a mechanism for providing context for objects, and how landscapes – combined with engaging interaction designs and the notion of pliability – can used as a way of providing immersive experiences for museum collections."

 

I think that Tim's ideas reflect a growing critical issue for anyone who attempts to curate large collections of information items: having an organization and navigation system that helps the newcomer, find and discover what it may interest him the most.

 

I myself feel quite frustrated by the absence of curation tools that truly allow me to organize and make accessible / discoverable large lists of information items in more effectives ways than the typical list, table or grid.

 

But I am positive that the future of curation will inevitably revolve around those who will find, invent and design new and effective ways to do so.

 

P.S.: Tim Wray is a PhD student that looks at how computational methods and interaction design can be used to create beautiful, engaging experiences for museum collections."

 

Very Interesting. Must-read for app designers. 9/10

 

Full article: http://timwray.net/2012/07/collections-as-landscapes-thoughts-in-experiential-interaction/

 

 


Via Robin Good
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Collection development for law libraries — Slaw

Collection development for law libraries — Slaw | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Shaunna Mireau:

"I attended an excellent session on collection development for law libraries at the Canadian Association of Law Libraries Conference last week."

 

"Collection development symposium – audience suggestions:

- Continuous need for re-evaluating your collection, talking to your users and finding out their requirements.
- Resource sharing agreements and relationships. Look to work together with different library units. Divide up responsibility for different topics.
- Negotiate for the portion of the content you want (commentary/analysis).
- Work with the publishers on bundling of the electronic commentary on their sites with pricing and licensing that works for the users.
- Consortia and interlibrary loans.
- Visit vendor booths and give feedback. Request bound formats – talk to authors.
- Needs assessments – feedback from front-line librarians.
- Get your library community involved. Building of relationships and review of collection.
- Communicate and build trust with the vendors.
- Collaboration with other library communities.
- Collection usage statistics are key.
I- mplementing rotational cancellation of loose-leaf services."

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Check out the New Image Café!

Check out the New Image Café! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Great way to stir up interest in your local history or digital image collections. University of Houston's Image Cafe lets you browse and download images from their collection.

-via INFOdocket

 

Great way to create interest for libraries & archives as well!


Via Doug Mirams
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Is It About Us, or Is It About Them? Libraries and Collections in a Patron-Driven World | ALA Editions

Is It About Us, or Is It About Them? Libraries and Collections in a Patron-Driven World | ALA Editions | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

New post to the blog from @Looptopper on the tension between librarian selection and a patron-driven acquisition http://t.co/LH7LTCa4...

 

"As budgets get tighter and prices keep rising, libraries are increasingly forced to think about ways to minimize waste in their collections. A sudden sharp interest in patron-driven acquisition solutions is one indicator of this concern, the idea being that when we let patrons select the books we buy, the less likely we are to buy books they don't want.

 

But this trend gives rise to deeply uncomfortable questions.

What does "waste" actually mean in a library collection—especially in a research library?

Can we ever know for certain that an uncirculated book won't be important at some point in the future?

Won't patron-driven processes lead to a breakdown in the collection's coherence?

And if we're just here to "give the people what they want," what meaningful function do librarians serve?

Do we just become shipping-and-receiving clerks?"

 

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Digital Librarianship & Social Media: the Digital Library as Conversation Facilitator

Digital Librarianship & Social Media: the Digital Library as Conversation Facilitator | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Digital Librarianship & Social Media: the Digital Library as Conversation Facilitator

Robert A. Schrier
Syracuse University
raschrie@syr.edu 

doi:10.1045/july2011-schrier

 

Abstract

Digital collections marketing is an important, yet often ignored aspect of digital collection management. While many collections are laudable for the quality of their pictures, metadata, and preservation techniques, they often remain obscure, unknown, and therefore inaccessible to their intended user populations. One of the ways digital librarians can cultivate a broader awareness of their collections is through social networking. More importantly, digital librarians who participate in conversations with users through the use of social media become inextricably intertwined with the knowledge creation processes relevant to their collections. This paper presents a set of five general principles (listening, participation, transparency, policy, and strategy) that provide digital librarians with straightforward, concrete strategies for successfully integrating social media into a digital library's overall strategic plan. In addition to these concrete strategies, I also explain the theoretical importance of each principle and its relevance for establishing a rapport with current and potential users of a digital collection.

 
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great article! Social Media helping to promote digital collections!

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Collection Bashing & Trashing | Michael Stephens - Office Hours

Collection Bashing & Trashing | Michael Stephens - Office Hours | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A few months ago in “Holding Us Back” (LJ 4/15/13, p. 42), I suggested that one of the things preventing librarians from working at web scale might be “a lingering emphasis on collections over users.” I and others have argued that the evolution of libraries and library service will include a pronounced shift from libraries as book warehouses to libraries as centers for discovery, learning, and creation via any number of platforms.

I might have been guilty of a bit of collection bashing in these discussions, and recent occurrences of collection trashing have given me pause. I still see the path forward detailed above as viable and inevitable, but we must also not forget that stewardship must not be sacrificed for a 3-D printer or a wall of monitors highlighting a digital collection.

LEARNING FROM #BOOKGATE

I followed with great interest the weeding kerfuffle now known as #bookgate at the Urbana Free Library(UFL) in Illinois. Tweets, news stories, and Facebook shares painted a grim picture of a weeding project gone horribly wrong. In a nutshell: books more than ten years old were removed from the nonfiction collection without reference to any other criteria..."

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Some thoughts on collections in a New Librarianship paradigm!

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Europeana Releases First Free iPad App | europeana

Europeana Releases First Free iPad App | europeana | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
‘Europeana Open Culture’ introduces you to hand-picked and beautiful collections from some of Europe’s top institutions, and allows people to explore, share and comment on them. Designed by Glimworm IT during a Europeana hackathon, the app provides an easy introduction to Europe’s glorious art treasury through five specially curated themes: Maps and Plans, Treasures of Art, Treasures of the Past, Treasures of Nature and Images of the Past.
Karen du Toit's insight:

Downloaded and it looks like a very rich collection!

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Timbuktu Update – Blog – Tombouctou Manuscripts Project

Timbuktu Update – Blog – Tombouctou Manuscripts Project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it


(http://www.tombouctoumanuscripts.org)
Huma (Institute for humanities in Africa)
University of Cape Town

Since the start of this week there are reports about the destruction of library buildings and book collections in Timbuktu. It sounds as if the written heritage of the town went up in flames. According to our information this is not the case at all. The custodians of the libraries worked quietly throughout the rebel occupation of Timbuktu to ensure the safety of their materials. A limited number of items have been damaged or stolen, the infrastructure neglected and furnishings in the Ahmad Baba Institute library looted but from all our local sources – all intimately connected with the public and private collections in the town - there was no malicious destruction of any library or collection.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Luckily it seems that most have been saved by the hard work of the custodians of the collections!

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Key Issues for e-Resource Collection Development: A Guide for Libraries | IFLA

Key Issues for e-Resource Collection Development: A Guide for Libraries | IFLA | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
#Libraries Key Issues for e-Resource #CollectionDevelopment: A Guide for Libraries http://t.co/3s6ozryN (via @Eileen_Shepherd)...

 

"The purpose of this Guide is to help develop an awareness of the key issues that every library will need to consider and address in developing an e-portfolio. The Guide is not intended to be exhaustive, but is written to provide a reasonable and informed introduction to the wide range of issues presented by electronic resources.
A guide that addresses an evolving subject area, such as electronic resources, requires updates. Thus, updates to this Guide at appropriate intervals, as determined by the Standing Committee of the IFLA Acquisition and Collection Development Section, will replace the previous edition on IFLANet. The current document is simply a snapshot of best practices at this point in time."

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"Bad Libraries Build Collections, Good Libraries Build Services, Great Libraries Build Communities"

"Virtual Dave" Lankes is a professor at Syracuse University's School of Information Studies:

The tweet that led to this post:

“Bad Libraries build collections. Good libraries build services (of which a collection is only one). Great libraries build Communities”

 

"There is nothing that says that good and great libraries don’t or can’t build collections. It is a matter of focus. If librarians focus solely or disproportionately on the collection, that is bad...If we are talking focus, what is the difference between bad libraries and good ones? Good libraries focus on users. That is they evaluate the utility of the collection [in] relation to user needs. What do people want and need in terms of the collection, and how does that balance with all the other things the library does (reference, programming, digital resources, instruction, etc.). Here not only do we look at user data such as circulation and such, but the whole user experience."


Via Miguel Mimoso Correia, Robin Illsley, Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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Evolving Hurdles: Collection Development at libraries

Evolving Hurdles: Collection Development at libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"I was talking with a friend the other day about how the problems of one library often are not the problems of another."

 

"Libraries have classically claimed a variety of challenges to collection development and development planning, depending on the institution’s size and type. Outsourced development firms can homogenize a collection. Where development staff are unfamiliar with the demographics of a local usership, a library may incur a wealth of items doomed to be sight unseen, while omitting from its collection materials that are truly valuable to its patrons.

Academic research libraries, while attempting to address the information explosion and provide access to increasing research publications, face escalating material costs and associated headaches. Add now fluctuations in the publisher-library relationship, inherent contractual issues regarding downloads, and debate over whether student interest justifies huge expenditures tied to digital collections.

It’s at once interesting, concerning, and necessary to look at the varied barriers to collection development and to evaluate how these obstacles have evolved."

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