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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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High tech book return system at the new West Springfield Library

A behind the scenes look at what happens when you return your book to the new West Springfield library.

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YouTube video

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WorldCat - YouTube video

WorldCat is a union catalog that itemizes the collections of 72000 libraries in 170 countries and territories that participate in the Online Computer Library Center ...
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A good introduction to WorldCat!

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Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma...

Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to present “NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage,” an online video by Program Officers Joshua Sternfeld and Jesse Johnston: http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/featured-project/neh-and-the-preservation-and-access-audiovisual-cultural-her. ;

The three-part video—which you may watch in full or in separate parts (links below)--covers NEH’s ongoing commitment to preserve audiovisual cultural heritage.  Part I provides an argument for the significance of a/v collections as an essential media for understanding the history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Part II summarizes the full range of grant programming for a/v collections provided by NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access that covers areas in research and development, education and training, assessment for smaller institutions, reformatting, cataloging, and stabilization through sustainable preventive conservation.  Finally, Part III describes NEH’s strategic planning to address the current crisis in a/v preservation and access.

We invite you to share the video or its constituent parts widely not just with fellow audiovisual archivists, librarians, and engineers, but administrators, scholars, and anyone else who may be interested to learn more about moving image and sound collections. 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

NEH is an independent grant-making agency of the United States government dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities.

 

FULL VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFTk6OLctVI&feature=player_embedded

 

PART I: The Significance of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TjWQFOcaGo&feature=player_embedded

 

PART II: NEH Division of Preservation and Access Grant Programming and Audiovisual Collections: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugcaJpcAktg&feature=player_embedded

 

PART III: NEH Strategic Planning and the Crisis of Audiovisual Preservation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyfXXfgxEQY&feature=player_embedded

rn more about moving image and sound collections. 

 

 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

 

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

To be shared widely, and encourage feedback as well!

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Medical Librarians Making a Difference - YouTube

Hear librarians share their personal stories and thoughts on how they strengthen the healthcare community through their research and dependability.Filmed at the MLA Conference in Chicago, 2014 (MT @wkhealth: How do med librarians make a difference?

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Medical librarians ivd

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The Lively Librarians, Episode 1: Makerspaces!

The Lively Librarians, Episode 1: Makerspaces! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Buzzword of the month: makerspaces! We’re seeing TONS of articles, blog posts, and tweets on makerspaces, and for many of you, this is a new concept. Want to learn more about this exciting addition to your school? Check out the first vlog by “The Lively Librarians,” Emily Gover and Michele Kirschenbaum!

In this video, you’ll learn:

Why libraries are the ideal environment for makerspacesResources you will needCommon misconceptions about makerspacesClassroom managementFunding options
Karen du Toit's insight:

Makerspaces video!

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Interview with Chicago History Museum Archivist Peter Alter

"Peter Alter is key to taking care of and locating more documents for the Chicago History Museum's miles of archival material, supporting and adding to the fascinating puzzle that is Chicago history."

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Interview on YouTube!

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What to expect from libraries in the 21st century: Pam Sandlian Smith at TEDxMileHigh - YouTube

"Why do we still need libraries in the age of digital, real-time information? In this emotional talk, Pam Sandlian Smith shows how she works to use the library as a hub for community-based knowledge creation and discourse."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great talk about the relevance of libraries!

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The Basics of Blended Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The Basics of Blended Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

With the growing embrace of technology into education, there emerges a whole bunch of new concepts and technical terminology in the teaching and learning literature to the point that it becomes cumbersome to keep track of the novelties in this field. Sometimes the lines are blurred and you can not even differentiate between one concept and the other as is the case between flipped classroom and blended learning. The list of such technical terminology is growing bigger and bigger and now we have : virtual classroom,, MOOCs, Asynchronous learning, virtual learning environment, Online Lab, to mention but some.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Valuable to librarians as well!

Two videos to describe the basics of blended learning. 

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Showcasing the Smithsonian Institution Archives Through Video, by Adrienne Miranda

by Adrienne Miranda, Intern, Digital Services Division on August 29, 2013


"When I first applied for an internship at the Smithsonian Institution Archives, I admittedly did not know much about it. For my internship, I was asked to make a video that would explain to the general public what the Archives was, as well as what resources it could offer them. On my first day here I was told that the Archives held the records and history of the Smithsonian Institution. I thought this sounded straightforward enough, but as I began to work on the video I realized there was more to it than that. With each new interview, with each day of shooting B-roll footage, or simply being around the office I heard new stories and learned new things about the Archives. I learned that there was everything here from correspondence, books, and architecture plans to photographs, negatives, and film reels. The subjects of these items range from science and history to art and literature. They cover a large span and scope of American History and give unique insight into it. There really is something to interest everyone here.

What I also discovered is that this information is available to the public. While I grew up in the Washington, DC area and have always enjoyed going to the Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo, I never knew that the Archives were also there as a public resource. Visitors can request specific information from the reference archivists, explore the collections online through the Archives’ website, or get helpful advice on preservation through the forums. These resources are valuable for everyone from researchers, to archivists, or anyone simply interested in the history of just about any subject."

 

Video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=io8Sfc5ir3k

 

Also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=_so_CJqGFF0

 

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting! Archives are a arich source of content!

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Verna Allee on Incentivizing Knowledge Sharing

In a mini-interview with Alakh Asthana of eClerx Services, Verna talks about why deliberate incentives for knowledge sharing are not necessary. She explains ...
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Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian's curator insight, June 27, 2013 11:59 AM

"... people love to talk about their work - how they solved a problem, something that they ran into, that they had a really great idea and it worked out etc. It's very natural for employees to share their achievements, problems and other areas of interests over informal coffee table discussions."

Karen du Toit's curator insight, June 28, 2013 4:10 AM

People love sharing knowledge!

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Google lets users decide what happens to their email after they die

Google lets users decide what happens to their email after they die | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Google is the first major company to let people decide what happens to emails, photographs, blogs and social networks if their account becomes inactive.

 

[...]

"In a new feature called Inactive Account Manager, users can choose what happens to their emails, photographs, videos, blogs, social networks and other Google services if their account becomes inactive.

Users can decide to have their data deleted after a certain period of inactivity of between 3 months and one year. They can also choose to have some or all of their data sent to up to ten people they know.

The service applies to Gmail, Google + profiles, Picasa albums, YouTube, Blogger, Google Drive, Google Pages and Google Voice."

Karen du Toit's insight:

An option that should have been there from the start!