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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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YALSA » An Interview with the Roadtripping Librarian - video

Over the summer Talya Sokoll traveled across the United States to learn about library services and collections for teens. Talya paid particular attention to space and collections that support the needs of LGBT teens.

 

Interview here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUw729Hk50E

 

You can read Talya’s article on trans* teens in YA literature in the summer issue of YALS, she updated the article on the YALS site and published a list of trans* YA titles there as well. You can also read her Roadtripping Librarian blog posts on this site."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting findings about libraries and their offerings for teens in the USA

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Welcome · Digital Public Library of America

Welcome · Digital Public Library of America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Digital Public Library of America brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world. It strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. The DPLA aims to expand this crucial realm of openly available materials, and make those riches more easily discovered and more widely usable and used, through its three main elements:

 

1. A portal that delivers students, teachers, scholars, and the public to incredible resources, wherever they may be in America. 

2. A platform that enables new and transformative uses of our digitized cultural heritage. 

3. An advocate for a strong public option in the twenty-first century."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Digital Public Library of America - a free resource!

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New AAUP Publishes New Guidelines on Librarians – Stephen's Lighthouse

New AAUP Publishes New Guidelines on Librarians – Stephen's Lighthouse | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The American Association of University Professors has updated guidelines for  librarians to reflect their changing roles as teachers and researchers. The  joint Statement on Faculty Status of College and University  Librarians (http://www.aaup.org/report/joint-statement-faculty-status-college-and-university-librarians) now includes language on technology in the library and recommends  that institutions adequately compensate librarians for the 12-month cycles in  which they typically work.


http://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2013/01/14/aaup-publishes-new-guidelines-librarians


Karen du Toit's insight:

An update to the original draft of 1973 guidelines!

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The Wrong War Over eBooks: Publishers Vs. Libraries, David Vinjamuri - Forbes

The Wrong War Over eBooks: Publishers Vs. Libraries, David Vinjamuri - Forbes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
This column is the first in a two-part series about libraries and their role in the marketing and readership of books. This first part addresses the present conflict.

Do libraries increase book sales or cannibalize them? This is the issue at the heart of the struggle between libraries represented by the American Library Association (whose president is Maureen Sullivan) and the Big Six publishers.
Karen du Toit's insight:

Very informative!

 

He looks at 1. The Issue 

                  2. The Library Perspective

                  3. The Publisher Perspective

                  4. Where the Big 6 Publishers stand today

                  5. Evaluation of the arguments

                  

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ALA Chapters Issue Joint Statement on E-Content Pricing | American Libraries Magazine

ALA Chapters Issue Joint Statement on E-Content Pricing | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American Libraries Magazine, the magazine of the American Library Association, delivers news and information about the library community.

 

Submitted by George Eberhart:


"A majority of the 57 state and regional chapters of the American Library Association have signed a joint statement in opposition to the practices of publishers and distributors that have established unfair pricing in the sale of ebooks to libraries.

ALA President Maureen Sullivan commented, “This joint statement underscores how critical this issue is for the public. Librarians across the country daily face questions from their readers about why access to ebooks is restricted. ALA fully supports this grassroots effort.”

So far, 33 ALA chapters (see list below) have signed on to the statement, and Indiana Library Federation Executive Director Susan Akers expects that a few more will join in the next few weeks."

 

List here: http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/inside-scoop/ala-chapters-issue-joint-statement-e-content-pricing

 

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Libraries and Museums Become Hands-On Learning Labs | MindShift

Libraries and Museums Become Hands-On Learning Labs | MindShift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @changeequation: Libraries and Museums Become Hands-On Learning Labs http://t.co/GHMWchLh @MindShiftKQED...

 

"Recognizing the importance of museums and libraries as sites for hands-on learning, the MacArthur Foundation and IMLS-sponsored competition plans to take the YOUmedia model and spread it nationally. The hope is for the new learning labs to serve as places where teens can explore science, technology, art, and literature — not just to not just to read about it — through building and making.

New teen learning labs will be built in San Francisco, CA; Thornton, CO; Columbia, MD; St. Paul, MN; Kansas City, MO; New York, NY; Columbus, OH; Portland, OR; Allentown, PA; Philadelphia, PA; Nashville, TN; and Houston, TX."

 

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The public library: historic artifact or adaptive success? - Infographic

The public library: historic artifact or adaptive success? - Infographic | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

With the rise of online resources, public libraries are facing the challenge of having to adapt in order to remain engaging in their communities. Take a look at this infographic to see how they are making their mark in the digital age.

 

'This infographic examines the current use of public libraries and challenges to their preeminence as providers (and symbols) of knowledge."


Via Luca Baptista, Michelle Bourque, Robin Illsley
Karen du Toit's insight:

Public libraries making it in the digital age! - Infographic based on a 2012 Pew Research study of American public libraries.

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Dawne Tortorella's curator insight, May 2, 2013 10:47 PM

An infographic based on well researched data and cited appropriately - nice to see as a best practice.

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RISD library fuses modern style with old architecture - The Brown Daily Herald

RISD library fuses modern style with old architecture - The Brown Daily Herald | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

A combination of old architecture and modern design, the library recently appeared on the list of “The 50 Most Amazing University Libraries in the world.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Beautiful library!

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America's first bookless public library will look 'like an Apple Store'

America's first bookless public library will look 'like an Apple Store' | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Bexar County, Texas says that it will open the first 100 percent digital public library system in the country, unveiling plans for its first location this past week. The plan has been in the works...
Karen du Toit's insight:

Fully digital!

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Toughing It Out in a Tight Job Market | By Janice Arenofsky, American Libraries Magazine

Toughing It Out in a Tight Job Market | By Janice Arenofsky, American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
You're all alone—with thousands of other information professionals—pursuing a library job in a down economy. If not for sheer stubbornness and hard-won self-respect, you might consider a career in the fast food industry.
Karen du Toit's insight:

"David Connolly, who compiles ALA’s JobLIST, a resource for career advice and job search information. The market is back to pre-2008, he said. “We may be treading water, but at least, it’s not getting worse.” In fact, according to Connolly, experienced librarians can anticipate a relatively strong job market because the first wave of baby boomers is retiring from such top-level library positions as director and department head. This trend should peak between 2015 and 2019. “There will be a trickle-down effect favoring promotions,” said Connolly, “although some libraries are not filling entry-level positions due to budgetary problems.”

So the advice for job searchers is compromise—in salary, work environment, and/or geographic location. For instance, consider academic library positions in the Midwest, where there is less competition because of fewer sought-after locations and subject-expert applicants."

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Data Shows Library Visits at Historic High (National Humanities Alliance)

1.59 billion visits in 2009  (Think libraries are dead?)

 

"December 2, 2011 – Data analyzed from the FY 2009 Public Library Survey (PLS), a census of public libraries in the 50 states, DC, and the territories, shows a 24.4% increase in library visits per capita in the last ten years, with total visits increasing by nearly 40%. In 2009 (the most recent data available) libraries were visited a record-breaking 1.59 billion times, reports the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

"People depend on libraries now more than ever," said IMLS Director Susan Hildreth in a press release. "Not only do visits and circulation continue to rise, the role of public libraries in providing Internet resources to the public continues to increase as well. Public libraries have also increased their program offerings to meet greater demand and provide more targeted services. Despite this demonstrated ability of libraries to adjust to meet the growing needs of the public, many libraries across the country face severe budget cuts. It’s important to remember that this data ends with 2009, before even more severe budget crises put so many libraries and library programs at risk."

The Institute’s analysis of the data showed that per capita visits and circulation rose in the century’s first decade. The number of public libraries increased during that period but not enough to keep pace with the rise in population. Library staffing remained stable, though the percentage of public libraries with degreed and accredited librarians increased."


Via Vesna Cosic
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Karen du Toit's comment, December 6, 2011 3:25 AM
Thanks!
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What do Americans want from their libraries? Here’s our chance to find out | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

This study would be valuable worldwide as well: We will be following:

 

"What does your community want and need from a library? If you’re a librarian, chances are you’ve made efforts to find out, to strategically plan, to adjust services to local interests and changing needs.

What does your community want and need from a library? If you’re a librarian, chances are you’ve made efforts to find out, to strategically plan, to adjust services to local interests and changing needs. Rarely, though, do any of us get to see a broad view of our library community through the filter of independent data.

The Pew Internet & American Life Project is going to give us that view. Over the next three years, new research will investigate the role of libraries in the digital age, focusing on the ways libraries serve their users and their communities. Supported by a $1.4 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the study will be implemented by the Pew Internet Project, a nonpartisan “fact tank” that conducts nationwide surveys and qualitative research to help us understand the evolution of internet use."

The grant will allow researchers to concentrate on libraries in a way they never have before. “It’s enormously exciting to be doing something very focused on libraries and librarians because they are primary stakeholders of our work,” says Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Internet Project. “I know from all the conversations I’ve had with librarians how interested they are to find out where they stand in the world, what services people expect of them, and where they might fit into the world of ebooks.”

 

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