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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Combining America's Digitized Libraries, All In One Place : NPR - Digital Public Library of America

Combining America's  Digitized Libraries, All In One Place : NPR - Digital Public Library of America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries have been digitizing their collections for years, but the materials can be hard to find. Enter the Digital Public Library of America.

[...]

"Part of a series, Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries

Buried in the archives of America's public and academic libraries are historical treasures — old papers, photos and records — that flesh out a detailed picture of our past.

Many libraries are trying to make it easier to find that material by putting digital copies online. But with so many different websites and databases to turn to, it may still require a research degree in Web searching to find anything. This spring, a program launched that aims to put all that great stuff in one place: the Digital Public Library of America.

The DPLA has already drawn scholars like Lincoln Mullen, a graduate student at Brandeis University who is researching the history of religious conversion in the United States. Mullen says the DPLA uncovered some hard-to-find documents at the College of Charleston in South Carolina — handwritten letters by a slave owner, William H.W. Barnwell, in which Barnwell discussed religious instruction to slaves and how the North misunderstood the South in these matters."

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More about the The Digital Public Library of America!

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Andrea Barnaby's curator insight, August 29, 2013 11:35 AM

Digitisation makes primary information in the reach of everyone.

Darryl Barnaby's curator insight, August 29, 2013 11:53 AM

Digitization puts primary resources in the reach of everyone.

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DPLA Launches, Librarians Respond

DPLA Launches, Librarians Respond | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
First impressions of the new DPLA portal have been almost uniformly positive, though many have suggested avenues for further enhancements and refinements.

 

"Launched yesterday, the Digital Public Library of America’s portal offers browsing and search access to a still growing aggregation of cultural heritage records from dozens of US cultural heritage institutions. At the same time, DPLA began offering programmatic access to its metadata stores, urging developers to create their own interfaces and access points to the collections. First impressions have been almost uniformly positive, though many have suggested avenues for further enhancements and refinements."

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Librarian insights into the Digital Public Library of America!

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One Google Books To Rule Them All?

One Google Books To Rule Them All? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Hellzapoppin' in the world of intellectual property rights these days.

 

In 2002, Google began scanning the world's 130 million or so books in preparation for the "secret 'books' project" that eventually became Google Books. In 2004, they began offering access to these scans, displaying the irritatingly-named "snippets" of books in their search results. And in no time at all, they were getting sued by the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers for copyright infringement.

These lawsuits, plus two more that were filed subsequently against Google, resulted in a six-year rollercoaster ride that, like all good roller coasters, exhilarated, terrified and rattled all the participants, and ended by thumping their quaking bods to a halt, last March, in very nearly the same place from which they'd started out.

But during that time the world had changed, and an altogether new way of bringing printed books into the digital commons had emerged.

Enter the nonprofit alternative for bringing the world's books online for all readers: the newly-funded Digital Public Library of America."

 

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Welcome · Digital Public Library of America

Welcome · Digital Public Library of America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Digital Public Library of America brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world. It strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. The DPLA aims to expand this crucial realm of openly available materials, and make those riches more easily discovered and more widely usable and used, through its three main elements:

 

1. A portal that delivers students, teachers, scholars, and the public to incredible resources, wherever they may be in America. 

2. A platform that enables new and transformative uses of our digitized cultural heritage. 

3. An advocate for a strong public option in the twenty-first century."

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The Digital Public Library of America - a free resource!

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Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows

Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Chris Meadows

"On MIT’s Technology Review, Nicholas Carr takes an in-depth look at the creation of the Digital Public Library of America, an attempt at a non-commercial universal electronic library (which I also mentioned last month) that hopes to provide universal access to as much of human knowledge as it can. Carr first looks at Google’s attempt to create Google Book Search, and the negotiated settlement that was thrown out as too overreaching. Though Google is moving ahead with its legal defense, the search market has shifted toward social networking meaning that a book search might not be as attractive to Google as it once was."

 

"But the biggest problem facing the DPLA may be the same one facing Google Books: the question of copyright. While the DPLA’s nonprofit status does open some doors to it that remain shut to Google Books (such as possibly working out the kind of licensing agreements with publishers that have given the commercial Google such trouble), it doesn’t give it carte blanche to offer works that are still under copyright. Having a truly comprehensive digital library could require Congress to pass new laws."

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Archivist of the United States on Digital Public Library of America Plenary

"Archivist of the United States (he's also a librarian!) and host of the DPLA Plenary (at took place at "his house"), David Ferriero, has blogged a brief item about the event on his AOTUS blog.

 

On Friday more than 300 government leaders, librarians, technologist, makers, students, and others interested members of the public “occupied” the National Archives to share their visions for the DPLA. The Sloan and Arcadia Foundations announced $5m in additional funding for the Project. Europeana, the European Digital Library, announced its intention of collaborating on interoperability among libraries, museum, and archives in the United States and Europe. And David Weinberger announced that his “head and heart are exploding to interoperate!”

A series of nine Beta Sprint demonstration presented possible DPLA prototypes. I am especially proud of the one done collaboratively by the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Library of Congress. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to seamlessly search across all three collections?!"

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