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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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The Case For Keeping Libraries Alive

The Case For Keeping Libraries Alive | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Ariel Schwartz:

"It’s not about checking out more books. An initiative is focusing on libraries around the world as centers of social and economic change, as well as centers to help the most disadvantaged citizens."


Via Trudy Raymakers
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Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012 by Colleen Egget

We are talking about reference and how it is changing in UPLIFT this week: August 15 at the Utah State Library & August 17 2012 in Ephraim, at the Karen A. Hunstman Library on the Snow College campus.

 

Reference and Services Trends in Public Libraries, 2012:

 

- Traditional reference work is less relevant to the needs of users
- Rather than worrying about reference’s demise, many librarians have been energized by their newly expanded roles
- Reconfigured or eliminated reference desks
- Consolidated desks and services
- Librarian and support staff work together on the one main desk
- Librarian can handle more complicated questions
- Increased training for support staff to handle basic reference questions
- The reference interview is as pertinent as ever
- Roving reference is more important—getting out to where people are
- Expansion of self-service options (self-checkout, online group study room reservations, self-service holds, and touch screen frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) on your website/ library catalog
- Reconfiguring online reference resources for smartphones and other mobile devices
- Librarians are exploring new roles in reaching out to meet information needs
- Reference through the stacks and other indirect means
- Reduction/elimination of print reference collections
- Greater marketing and promotion of online resources and services
- Librarians will spend less time staffing desks and more time outside of library walls
- Online reference: email, chat, Instant Messaging, and SMS (short messaging services) reaches users who may not visit the library
- Online reference requires continual marketing to be successful
- Collaborating with other organizations will do as much to keep libraries alive as any project or program
- Embedded librarianship: becoming an integral part. Getting close to users by getting out into the community; being actively present with the user at the point of need.
- The big shift: we’re not doing things “for” the community, but we’re being a part “of” the community
- Libraries are shifting from the physical to the virtual facilities and media; from an individual to a community focus; from being a collection library to being a creation library; from being an archive to being a portal

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The Future of Libraries : Beyond Search, by Cynthia Murrell

Cynthia Murrell:

"News and Information from ArnoldIT.com about Search and Content Processing" (New blog post: The Future of Libraries http://t.co/T41wMdxQ...)...

 

"The Republic perceives the inevitable winds and encourages us to adjust our sails in “The Bookless Library.” No matter how much some of us would like to believe otherwise, the traditional library with its stacks upon stacks of wood pulp tomes is on its way out. In a lengthy article that is worth a read, journalist David A. Bell suggests we proactively manage the shift in a way that will best benefit society.
This paragraph was particularly poignant to me:
“Specialized scholars will always have reasons to consult the original paper copies of books. Marginalia, watermarks, paper quality, binding, and many other features of the physical book that digitization cannot always capture offer valuable clues about how the books were produced, circulated, and read, how they created meaning. But this sort of research . . . involves a small number of readers. Far more readers, of course, appreciate physical books for their aesthetic qualities: the feel of the paper, the crisp look of print on the page, the elegant binding, the pleasant heft of the volume in the hand, the sense of history embedded in a venerable edition that has gone through many owners. But this sort of pleasure, real and meaningful as it is, is harder to justify financially, as resources grow increasingly scarce.”

 

Read the article by David A. Bell here: http://www.tnr.com/article/books-and-arts/magazine/david-bell-future-bookless-library

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Startup culture and the future of academic libraries: An interview with Brian Mathews | Education Futures

Startup culture and the future of academic libraries: An interview with Brian Mathews | Education Futures | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Mathews is one of the most creative administrators in higher education today. He is the author of the popular Ubiquitous Librarian blog, part of The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Blog Network, and the 2009 book “Marketing Today’s Academic Library: A Bold New Approach to Communicating with Students”.

Recently, Brian gained international attention for his work “Think Like A Startup: a white paper to inspire library entrepreneurialism” intended to inspire transformative thinking in higher education using insight into startup culture and innovation methodologies."

 

White paper here: http://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/18649


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R. David Lankes Presents New Librarianship

R. David Lankes Presents New Librarianship | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
A series of presentations and lectures on participatory and new librarianship.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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LibraryCamp: crowdfunded UK unconference for libraries - Boing Boing - YouTube video

"Library Camp: crowdfunded UK unconference for libraries - Library Camp brings together people who are interested in modernising and transforming libraries for one day of intensive debate, knowledge sharing and ideas."

 

"Sue Sez, "If the LibraryCamp Crowdfunder pitch reaches its target, library workers from across the UK be heading to Birmingham in October to attend LibraryCamp 2012 (think Barcamp). The volunteer organisers decided to set up their own DIY conference last year because traditional conferences were too expensive and often staff on the frontline weren't allowed to go. But Library camp is different - it's an unconference for a start, so anyone can lead a workshop or facilitate a session. It's also free to attend and you don't have to be a librarian or even work in a library, you just need to be passionate about the future of libraries."

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Technology Game Changers for Libraries

Technology Game Changers for Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Dr Steve Matthews:

"A recent article by Technology writer Christina Farr for GOOD Technology titled The Top 10 Technology Game Changers for the Next Decade sparked my interest, since technology is changing the game in libraries.

 

"There were at least three of her 10 that I felt directly impacted libraries and the way we will have to do business. They are:

1. Visual Learning Robotics

2. Internet Data Expansion

3. Voice Recognition"


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms

Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Carl Grant:

"At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, I gave the keynote talk at the NISO Update Session. My goal was to give attendees some thoughts about how important it is that they participate actively in the shaping of the new cloud-computing platforms which are are emerging from a number of organizations, including OCLC, Ex Libris, Serials Solution, Innovative and Kuali. I stated that the main reason for our participation as librarians is simply this: So we can ensure the value of librarianship is contained within and amplified by these new technological foundations.

 

There were three key points I talked about us doing in order to accomplish this. They were:

1. The mission and value of librarianship have to be embedded in the software you’re using.

2. Defining our future is a task of participation, NOT representation.

3. For our services to have value they must offer differentiation."

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Sydney's first 24 Hour Library on its way? « Readers in the Mist

Sydney's first 24 Hour Library on its way? « Readers in the Mist | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Posted by Librarians with Altitude. Part of a larger proposal going before the City of Sydney Council this month is the possibility of the library in the Old Custom House building being open 24 hours.

 

"This is just one of many measures to attract a greater mix of people, events and businesses to the city at night and boost annual late-night turnover to $30 billion by 2030. The plan proposes developing a ”night cities global index” to rank cities by their night economies – with the goal of earning a top-three placing for Sydney. It said a 25 per cent increase in jobs in the city’s night economy by 2030 would count as a measure of success, as would increasing shops to 40 per cent of businesses open after 6pm."

 

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/about-town/plan-for-sydney-at-night-lets-go-to-the-24hour-library-20120614-20bhq.html#ixzz1z35fdLZF

 

 

 

 

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Beyond the Book Mobile | How Libraries are Reinventing Themselves for the Future | NewsFeed | TIME.com

Beyond the Book Mobile | How Libraries are Reinventing Themselves for the Future | NewsFeed | TIME.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By ALLISON BERRY:

"Many branches of these public institutions are dying from lack of funding—and reinventing themselves in surprising new ways (How Libraries are Reinventing Themselves for the Future: http://t.co/hNF4tlXm...)"

 

"Today’s libraries aren’t just trying to fulfill what a March study by the Pew Charitable Trusts calls the institutions’ “shadow mandate” of bridging the widening gaps in social services that used to be provided by non-profits and public agencies. Libraries are also trying to meet people where they are. The cash-strapped Free Library of Philadelphia, a stalwart system founded in 1891, has set up six “Hot Spots” to expand its reach in underserved areas. It’s much cheaper to open these freestanding mini-libraries, which are equipped with computers, printers, and a reference collection, inside facilities owned by community organizations than it is to open a new branch. In a similar move, the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh has opened what it calls a “library without walls” in the Pittsburgh Public Market in an effort to deliver library services on the weekends in a place where a lot of people do their food-shopping. Some libraries are even venturing outdoors. In response to recent branch closures in Detroit, the University of Michigan this spring partnered with students at a local elementary school to set up six outdoor libraries, whose waterproof bookcases, unlike book mobiles, don’t come with expensive gas bills."

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/06/22/how-libraries-are-reinventing-themselves-for-the-future/#beyond-the-book-mobile#ixzz1ynvY8uhf

 

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The Public Library of 2020, by Steve Matthews | 21st Century Library Blog

The Public Library of 2020, by Steve Matthews | 21st Century Library Blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"According to Pew Research Center's “Pew Internet & American Life Project” they think they know what public libraries will be by the year 2020. I wouldn't question their research, but I'm skeptical about some of their conclusions..."

 

Conclusions drawn by Dr Steve Matthews:

- "The nature of the library customer is changing and will continue to change toward technology being an integral part of their life."

- Volume, relevance & velocity... "These three factors will continue to be a constant. However, in another 8 years there will be more customers who do not need librarians to filter their information, nor manage their information stream."

- Anywhere, anytime, any device... "This is a fact of life that will never go away. Librarians need to understand that and begin to work within it."

- Sentries, evaluators, filters, certifiers... "Pew was trying to appease the “old guard library establishment”, because none of their reported facts unquestionably leads to these roles. I don’t know from where they drew these roles, but they got this wrong. Customers in 2020 will not need any of these roles from librarians. They will fill these roles for themselves."

- Aggregator/Synthesizer, Organizer, Network Node, Facilitator... "These will be the roles of the 21st Century librarian, and library."

 

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Libraries, Archives and Museums: A Strategic Conversation: Opening Talk

Monday, April 9 For generations Harvard's libraries, archives, and museums have been pre-eminent participants in support of the research ...youtube.com...

 

"For generations Harvard's libraries, archives, and museums have been pre-eminent participants in support of the research, teaching, and learning carried out both within the university, and also beyond its walls. In an increasingly connected global society, interdisciplinary work is becoming the norm and researchers increasingly seek and share information across formats, genres, and institutional settings. To support users and to continue to grow and thrive, libraries, archives, and museums must work and grow together as never before. This "strategic conversation" brings together those who have given thought to these issues. They have inspired changes and faced challenges along the way. Three presenters, one of each from the domains of libraries, archives, and museums, will outline the vision they bring to their institutions, how they envision the major points of commonality, their greatest hurdles, and how the lessons learned in collection development of physical collections, do or do not apply to collection development in the digital domain.
Libraries: Tom Hickerson, Vice Provost of Libraries and Cultural Resources, University of Calgary

Archives: David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States

Museums: Holly Witchey, Professor, Johns Hopkins University; Interim Director, Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts

Moderator: Gunter Waibel, Director, Digitization Program, Smithsonian"


Via Dave Allen, Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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Technology & innovations in libraries and their impact on learning, research & user / Singapore iatul keynote

My keynote for the 33rd IATUL (International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries) conference in Singapore.

 

"Keynote speaker, Joe Murphy, delivers his presentation on the topic,  Technology & innovations in libraries and their impact on learning, research and user, on Day 2 on the theme "Technology & New Media" of the 33rd IATUL Conference held at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, 4-7 June 2012."

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Cafe Poets at Melbourne City Library | Library as Incubator Project

Cafe Poets at Melbourne City Library | Library as Incubator Project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"One-off performances and workshops by poets, musicians, and other entertainers are hugely popular in libraries and serve as valuable additions to a library’s program roster. But long-term partnerships or residencies mean that an artist works closely with a library to facilitate a suite of programs, integrating inspiring performances with hands-on learning opportunities. Artists-in-residence may be visual artists, writers, or performers.

An excellent example of a poet-in-residence program is found in the Cafe Poet project in Australia. Established by Australian Poetry in 2009, the Cafe Poet program “aims to promote poetry while strengthening community relationships.” So far about fifty poets have been placed in cafes, bookshops, and, in the City of Melbourne’s case, the City Library.

The exchange is beneficial for everyone: poets are given space to write (and complimentary tea/coffee), as well as the chance to engage with their community; the host gets to be part of the poetry community, plan events in conjunction with the poet, and (hopefully) increase foot traffic."

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Who says Poetry is dead!

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Private Library labours to be relevant again - New York Times

Private Library labours to be relevant again - New York Times | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Private Library Labors to Be Relevant AgainNew York TimesPublished: August 7, 2012.

 

[...] "the Huntington Free Library and Reading Room in the Bronx [...]

trying to reinvent itself in a more humble role: that of a traditional community library.

It still does not lend books and it remains privately owned and operated. But instead of catering to scholars studying American Indians, it now hosts monthly meetings about Bronx history. It invites children for arts and crafts, and it organizes an annual scavenger hunt for historical artifacts. Last month, it allowed HBO to make over its reading room as a backdrop for the series “Boardwalk Empire.”

“We don’t want to be ‘This is what a library used to look like,’ ” said Thomas X. Casey, the library’s president. “We want to be an active participant in the community, not just a museum.”

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Beyond the Bullet Points: It is Time to Stop Trying to Save Libraries » Virtual Dave...Real Blog

Beyond the Bullet Points: It is Time to Stop Trying to Save Libraries » Virtual Dave...Real Blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

R David Lankes:

"Beyond the Bullet Points: It is Time to Stop Trying to Save Libraries" » Virtual Dave...Real Blog - http://t.co/4NaBjGxy...

 

"I believe the future of libraries is bright. I believe that libraries improve society. I believe that libraries are key to positive social transformation. I believe that librarians are facilitators of knowledge. I believe that librarians are the most important assets of any library. It is in my demonstration of these beliefs that I help ensure the future of libraries and librarians. I don’t need to save libraries. Libraries have survived for over 3,000 years. Libraries have survived famine, plagues, prejudice, censorship, and anti-intellectualism well before either of us came along. I don’t need to save libraries, I need to help transform them. The test of that transformation is not in a building, or a collection, or a service, or even the librarians; it is in the achievements of the community."

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The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed

The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Submitted by Patricia J Delois:

RT @sallyheroes: "It appears that the number one thing patrons use the library for is (prepare yourself) books": http://t.co/CEiQTtdC via @JustinLibrarian...

 

"[...] surprised they would select books when they have so many other things to choose from. I imagine he’s even more surprised to learn that something else patrons rate highly is personal interaction with the staff. I don’t know who designed the survey, but it couldn’t have been the director. It wouldn’t have occurred to him to put “human interaction” on the list of things patrons might value. He’s all about technology.

No one disputes that technology has improved the library experience for the patron. You can search the catalog from home and access our subscribed databases. You can place your own holds, request your own interlibrary loan materials, download books to your own devices.

The library is working towards self-checkout, presumably so you can conduct all your library business without ever having to interact with the staff. This must sound like a dream-come-true for the director, who hates to interact with the library staff, but for patrons, there’s more to the library than just the delivery of materials. They like human contact."

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