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The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed

The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Submitted by Patricia J Delois:

RT @sallyheroes: "It appears that the number one thing patrons use the library for is (prepare yourself) books": http://t.co/CEiQTtdC via @JustinLibrarian...

 

"[...] surprised they would select books when they have so many other things to choose from. I imagine he’s even more surprised to learn that something else patrons rate highly is personal interaction with the staff. I don’t know who designed the survey, but it couldn’t have been the director. It wouldn’t have occurred to him to put “human interaction” on the list of things patrons might value. He’s all about technology.

No one disputes that technology has improved the library experience for the patron. You can search the catalog from home and access our subscribed databases. You can place your own holds, request your own interlibrary loan materials, download books to your own devices.

The library is working towards self-checkout, presumably so you can conduct all your library business without ever having to interact with the staff. This must sound like a dream-come-true for the director, who hates to interact with the library staff, but for patrons, there’s more to the library than just the delivery of materials. They like human contact."

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7 Things Library Customers Want NOW | Customer Service and Library Patrons | Text a Librarian - Text Messaging for Libraries

7 Things Library Customers Want NOW | Customer Service and Library Patrons | Text a Librarian - Text Messaging for Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Lisa Carlucci Thomas:

"What attracts library customers to today’s libraries? The rise of mobile culture and the smart phone society brings a dynamic shift in expectations about how, when, and where to access information. Endless media streams, interactive news feeds, and autonomous research options provide numerous avenues for information-seeking customers. What factors draw their attention to the library, rather than a crowdsourced data channel, commercial service, or search engine?

1. Convenience.

2. Community

3. Immediacy

4. Accuracy

5. Customization

6. Privacy

7. Service"

 

Read more: http://www.textalibrarian.com/mobileref/7-things-library-customers-want-now-customer-service-and-library-patrons/

 

 


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Watch as public libraries reinvent themselves yet again, by Julie-Anne Cardellais

Watch as public libraries reinvent themselves yet again, by Julie-Anne Cardellais | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Amid ever-evolving trends in technology, the question has come to me: Is there a future for the public library? And if so, what will that library look like?

 

"The need to access information will only escalate and methods for interacting with the information will continue to evolve. Traditional library resources, dare I say print, are becoming more and more a medium of the past. The challenge for libraries – and librarians – is how (and in what format) to access and acquire information that can eventually be directed and channelled to its users.

The library of the future may not be the physical storehouse it was in the past, but it can remain the vehicle for accessing information. It can still be that powerful entity around which communities rally, and which gives credence to the concept of social hub or even community hub.

And so, I remain confident that its future is bright, engaged and vital, enhancing all aspects of community life.

Julie-Anne Cardellais a professional librarian, the director of the Westmount Public Library and past president of l’Association des bibliothécaires du Québec/Quebec Library Association."

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Watch+public+libraries+reinvent+themselves+again/6844165/story.html#ixzz1zdBnoSYz

 

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Digital age takes libraries off the shelf > Ryan Stokes - The Age

Digital age takes libraries off the shelf > Ryan Stokes - The Age | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Age: Digital age takes libraries off the shelf"

writes Catherine Armitage:

 

Ryan Stokes ... "new technology can enable more people to enjoy collections."

 

"In his own words, Stokes brings a "great interest" and ''passion'' for the "treasures that are in the library, the uniqueness of that material and its meaning to Australia"."

He is also an admirer of the world-leading work the library has done in digitising the physical collections and archiving material that originates in digital form, such as websites."

 

"The ability to interact with libraries via the internet means log-ins will be no less important than in-person visits as a measure of the reach of libraries, especially when the national broadband network is in operation.
"We are only at the beginning of conceiving how we can use that capacity," Schwirtlich says. The amount of data the library can supply and the way people interact with it will be transformed. Curatorial experts physically visible to community groups or classes on the other side of the country will be able to conduct virtual tours of collections.
Stokes says "continuing to enrich the experiences available for free" remains a core objective for the NLA under his stewardship.
Schwirtlich reminds that, powerful as it is, Google does not pay for and provide access to the mass of information resources in libraries, which have always played a vital social role in giving people access to information regardless of their wealth."
The ''purposeful, long-term, methodical, expert work of collecting, cataloguing and archiving'' remains vital to the nation, she says. "The future is tethered, shaped, informed and nourished by the past."

 

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/digital-life-news/digital-age-takes-libraries-off-the-shelf-20120629-217fj.html#ixzz1zS744at1

 

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Exploring new roles for libraries and mediating technologies in addressing the DIY mindset of library patrons > Slideshare

Presentation given at the American Library Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA. June 23, 2012.

 

by Bohyun Kim on Jun 20, 2012

"Presentation given at the American Library Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA. June 23, 2012.

Speaker: Bohyun Kim, Digital Access Librarian, Florida International University
Speaker: Jason Clark, Head of Digital Access and Web Services, Montana State University Libraries
Speaker: Patrick T. Colegrove, Head, DeLaMare Science & Engineering Library, University of Nevada, Reno"

More program details: http://ala12.scheduler.ala.org/m/node/806

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Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012

Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
An innovative course yields new products, services, and experiences that model the possible future of libraries.

 

by Jonathan Shaw:

“WHAT IF YOU THOUGHT seriously about the library as a laboratory, as a place where people do things, where they make things?” asks Jeffrey Schnapp, addressing his “Library Test Kitchen” class. Libraries as centers of knowledge and learning have a rich history—but an uncharted future. The digital revolution, besides changing the nature of books, is transforming the role of libraries in preserving and disseminating information. “What if the Library of Congress were to become a digital library?” continues Schnapp. “What, then, is the role of the physical public library? This is a source of enormous anxiety at the local level because public libraries” face increasing political pressure, including budget cuts, but “play absolutely fundamental civic roles, often as the only public space that remains in smaller communities.”

[...]

"By semester’s end, the brainstorming sessions had generated dozens of good ideas, and a few had become student projects: Biblio, a conceptualization of a hand-held device for scanning books that tracks and shares research and even makes bibliographic recommendations for further study (see the online video); Timeslice, a “graphical electronic bulletin board” that lets library users post event announcements to a community calendar that incorporates digital graphics; Neo-Carrel, a study chair with a raised platform in front that doubles as a laptop stand and a comfortable place to rest one’s head for a nap (now installed in Lamont library); and a WiFi cold spot, a radically designed room for reflection or refuge from an increasingly connected world.

“We think this is an opportunity to be real catalysts for thoughtful change that can’t easily come from other quarters,” explains Schnapp. “Because we’re not librarians, but instead a community of artists, scholars, engineers—people interested in knowledge—we come at the questions a little bit differently. So we think we can be innovative and breathe some fresh air into a conversation that often is about how many jobs are going to be cut, or what will happen to all the space that is freed up once the stacks move out to the Harvard Depository. That’s a conversation that may have to happen, but it would be a tragedy if that were the only framework in which we thought about the possibilities for enhancing the mission of libraries.”


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Cataloging Then, Now, and Tomorrow - American Libraries

Cataloging Then, Now, and Tomorrow - American Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Elise (Yi-Ling) Wong:

"There’s no question that the art of cataloging and the role of its practitioners are evolving. Where specialization is preferred, catalogers remain steadfastly the guardians of library catalogs to ensure their accuracy, currency, comprehensiveness, and user-friendliness. But catalogers are also mediators between libraries and other information organizations (e.g., museums and archives), as they are charged with understanding the interoperability between the MARC standard and the different non-MARC metadata systems.

The notion of catalogers “just” being catalogers is gradually being replaced by a philosophy that all library staff be cross-trained and have hands-on experience working directly with library users. At SMCL, all librarians (including catalogers) take at least one reference shift. In collection development, we are subject selectors allocated funds to purchase materials in our subject areas. In addition, selectors are responsible for maintaining their subject pages on the library website. In library instruction sessions, we collaborate with faculty members in their teaching and research."

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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Futurist Thomas Frey:

"Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books.
Libraries exist to give us access to information. Until recently, books were one of the more efficient forms of transferring information from one person to another. Today there are 17 basic forms of information that are taking the place of books, and in the future there will be many more…"

 

"Here is a list of 17 primary categories of information that people turn to on a daily basis. While they are not direct replacements for physical books, they all have a way of eroding our reliance on them. There may be more that I’ve missed, but as you think through the following media channels, you’ll begin to understand how libraries of the future will need to function:
Games 
Digital Books 
Audio Books 
Magazines 
Music 
Photos 
Videos 
Television 
Movies
Radio 
Blogs 
Podcasts 
Apps 
Presentations 
Courseware 
Personal Networks 
Each of these forms of information has a place in future libraries. Whether or not physical books decline or even disappear has little relevance in the overall scheme of future library operations."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Perspectives on SAOIM 2012, via SAOUG

Perspectives on SAOIM 2012, via SAOUG | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Southern African Online Information Meeting with the theme: "Innovation in an Age of Limits"

 

By Phillipa Mitchell

"The SAOIM conference 2012 was a wonderful place for someone on the other end of the book spectrum – that of bookselling as opposed to being a librarian – to immerse themselves."

 

More chronicles here: http://saoug.org.za/category/saoim2012/

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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"People who think libraries are going away simply because books are going digital are missing the true tectonic shifts taking place in the world of information.


Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books."

 

"Libraries have always had a mandate to archive the records of their service area, but it has rarely been pursued with more than passing enthusiasm. Archives of city council meetings and local history books made the cut, but few considered the library to be a good photo or video archive.
Over time, many of the newspapers, radio, and television stations will begin to disappear. As these businesses lose their viability, their storerooms of historical broadcast tapes and documents will need to be preserved. More specifically, every radio broadcast, newspaper, and television broadcast will need to be digitized and archived.
With the advent of iCloud and other similar services libraries will want to expand their hosting of original collections, and installing the equipment to digitize the information. The sale of this information to the outside world through an iTunes-like service could become a valuable income stream for libraries in the future.
Final Thoughts
Libraries, much like any living breathing organism, will have to adapt to the complex nature of the ever-changing world of information. As information becomes more sophisticated and complex, so will libraries.
Libraries are here to stay because they have a survival instinct. They have created a mutually dependent relationship with the communities they serve, and most importantly, they know how to adapt to the changing world around them.
I am always impressed with the creative things being done in libraries. As Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” There are a lot of beautiful dreams taking place that will help form tomorrow’s libraries."
By Futurist Thomas Frey


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Have a look at the future Kirkintilloch library

Have a look at the future Kirkintilloch library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
THIS is how Kirkintilloch’s popular library will look in three months time.

 

"The library area’s floor space will be reduced and a customer services zone created – including interview and meeting rooms, self-service computers, telephone and enquiry booths, and customer service pods.

The revamped library will feature a new children’s section, a cafe, a study group area and learning suite, free Internet access and a self-service point where users can check books in and out.

A central seating area, staffed desks, self-service payment kiosks and a multi-media display are also part of the plans."


Via Patrick Provencher
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Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica

Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Curt Hopkins:

"Libraries are changing, despite their facades. And they're changing to high-tech service companies with embedded librarians, according to some library professionals."

 

"This transition time is one of great opportunity for those involved in libraries, but all transitions, all borders and verges, are places of great vulnerability as well. Grand changes are possible here, but so are operatic failures. The future seems promising. It’s the present that worries some librarians.

“The myth that the information scholars need for research and teaching is, or soon will be available for free online is a dangerous one,” said Bourg, “especially when it is used as an excuse to cut funding to libraries. Right now libraries face enormous but exciting challenges in maintaining print collections and services where they are still necessary, while simultaneously developing strategies for collecting, preserving, organizing, and providing access to digital objects. I fear that if libraries across the nation don’t get the resources we collectively need to meet these challenges that we may be at risk of losing big chunks of our cultural record because of a lack of funding for digital collecting and preservation."

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Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries

Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Michel-Adrien:

"At a session this morning at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) in Toronto, New York-based consultant Nigel Holloway outlined some of the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among CALL members."

 

"Some 140 law librarians responded, about one quarter of the CALL membership, with two fifths of respondents coming from law firms, a bit over one third from from courthouse libraries, and about one sixth from universities. More than 50% of respondents worked in small libraries (1-3 staff), more or less 20% in medium-sized libraries (4-9), and about one quarter in libraries with more than 10 staff members."

[...]

"The survey is quite revealing about the trend toward digital content. Right now, some 45% of respondents state that more than 40% of their content is in digital format. 70% of respondents expect this to be the situation by 2014."

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R. David Lankes Presents New Librarianship

R. David Lankes Presents New Librarianship | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
A series of presentations and lectures on participatory and new librarianship.

Via Buffy J. Hamilton, Dennis T OConnor
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LibraryCamp: crowdfunded UK unconference for libraries - Boing Boing - YouTube video

"Library Camp: crowdfunded UK unconference for libraries - Library Camp brings together people who are interested in modernising and transforming libraries for one day of intensive debate, knowledge sharing and ideas."

 

"Sue Sez, "If the LibraryCamp Crowdfunder pitch reaches its target, library workers from across the UK be heading to Birmingham in October to attend LibraryCamp 2012 (think Barcamp). The volunteer organisers decided to set up their own DIY conference last year because traditional conferences were too expensive and often staff on the frontline weren't allowed to go. But Library camp is different - it's an unconference for a start, so anyone can lead a workshop or facilitate a session. It's also free to attend and you don't have to be a librarian or even work in a library, you just need to be passionate about the future of libraries."

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Technology Game Changers for Libraries

Technology Game Changers for Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Dr Steve Matthews:

"A recent article by Technology writer Christina Farr for GOOD Technology titled The Top 10 Technology Game Changers for the Next Decade sparked my interest, since technology is changing the game in libraries.

 

"There were at least three of her 10 that I felt directly impacted libraries and the way we will have to do business. They are:

1. Visual Learning Robotics

2. Internet Data Expansion

3. Voice Recognition"


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms

Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Carl Grant:

"At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, I gave the keynote talk at the NISO Update Session. My goal was to give attendees some thoughts about how important it is that they participate actively in the shaping of the new cloud-computing platforms which are are emerging from a number of organizations, including OCLC, Ex Libris, Serials Solution, Innovative and Kuali. I stated that the main reason for our participation as librarians is simply this: So we can ensure the value of librarianship is contained within and amplified by these new technological foundations.

 

There were three key points I talked about us doing in order to accomplish this. They were:

1. The mission and value of librarianship have to be embedded in the software you’re using.

2. Defining our future is a task of participation, NOT representation.

3. For our services to have value they must offer differentiation."

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Sydney's first 24 Hour Library on its way? « Readers in the Mist

Sydney's first 24 Hour Library on its way? « Readers in the Mist | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Posted by Librarians with Altitude. Part of a larger proposal going before the City of Sydney Council this month is the possibility of the library in the Old Custom House building being open 24 hours.

 

"This is just one of many measures to attract a greater mix of people, events and businesses to the city at night and boost annual late-night turnover to $30 billion by 2030. The plan proposes developing a ”night cities global index” to rank cities by their night economies – with the goal of earning a top-three placing for Sydney. It said a 25 per cent increase in jobs in the city’s night economy by 2030 would count as a measure of success, as would increasing shops to 40 per cent of businesses open after 6pm."

 

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/about-town/plan-for-sydney-at-night-lets-go-to-the-24hour-library-20120614-20bhq.html#ixzz1z35fdLZF

 

 

 

 

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Beyond the Book Mobile | How Libraries are Reinventing Themselves for the Future | NewsFeed | TIME.com

Beyond the Book Mobile | How Libraries are Reinventing Themselves for the Future | NewsFeed | TIME.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By ALLISON BERRY:

"Many branches of these public institutions are dying from lack of funding—and reinventing themselves in surprising new ways (How Libraries are Reinventing Themselves for the Future: http://t.co/hNF4tlXm...)"

 

"Today’s libraries aren’t just trying to fulfill what a March study by the Pew Charitable Trusts calls the institutions’ “shadow mandate” of bridging the widening gaps in social services that used to be provided by non-profits and public agencies. Libraries are also trying to meet people where they are. The cash-strapped Free Library of Philadelphia, a stalwart system founded in 1891, has set up six “Hot Spots” to expand its reach in underserved areas. It’s much cheaper to open these freestanding mini-libraries, which are equipped with computers, printers, and a reference collection, inside facilities owned by community organizations than it is to open a new branch. In a similar move, the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh has opened what it calls a “library without walls” in the Pittsburgh Public Market in an effort to deliver library services on the weekends in a place where a lot of people do their food-shopping. Some libraries are even venturing outdoors. In response to recent branch closures in Detroit, the University of Michigan this spring partnered with students at a local elementary school to set up six outdoor libraries, whose waterproof bookcases, unlike book mobiles, don’t come with expensive gas bills."

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/06/22/how-libraries-are-reinventing-themselves-for-the-future/#beyond-the-book-mobile#ixzz1ynvY8uhf

 

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