The Information P...
Follow
Find tag "digital"
16.9K views | +0 today
The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Would used e-books work, redux | TeleRead

Would used e-books work, redux | TeleRead | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Chris Meadows:

"Since the ReDigi lawsuit surfaced a few days ago, some of the e-book blogs have been taking notice.

[...] TeleRead has already looked at these issues a couple of times, with a reprint of a post on first sale by Marilynn Byerly and my own look at digital resale efforts that didn’t get off the ground. Fundamentally, digital and resale currently just don’t mix.

Even if copyright laws permitted the copying necessary for such a resale (which they currently do not), it’s unrealistic to expect people not to try to have their e-cake and eat it too. Just as you can’t make uncrackable media DRM, you can’t really ensure someone is being honest about getting rid of all copies of media he has “resold”."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The Archivist Detective – Digital Forensics for Archivists | AuthentiCity

The Archivist Detective – Digital Forensics for Archivists | AuthentiCity | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The Archivist Detective – Digital Forensics for Archivists http://t.co/skTkHPJ3...

 

"Archives Manager Heather Gordon likes to say that being an archivist is like “playing detective”. There has always been an aspect of detective work in what archivists do—from digging through boxes left abandoned in a garage searching for records to helping researchers find the documentation that helps them accomplish their work.

 

In the age of digital acquisitions, her statement couldn’t be more true. Unlike their physical analogue counterparts, donations that come to us in folders on digital media can’t be easily leafed through and assessed at first glance. Those folders and their contents are made of bits that don’t have meaning without some kind of hardware and/or software intermediary."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The Posterity Project: Thinking outside the box in the digital age... #archivists

The Posterity Project: Thinking outside the box in the digital age... #archivists | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Gordon Belt:

"While there are many individual archivists doing outstanding work in productively applying social media in the workplace, as a whole our profession is very far behind our colleagues in the library community.

As a member of the Special Libraries Association, I see first-hand the efforts made by that organization to embrace technology, and the initiative among special collections librarians to be "future ready" in the information age. But what are archivists doing in a collective way to prepare for work that is increasingly being done in "The Cloud?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Libraries collaborate to increase digital content offerings

Libraries collaborate to increase digital content offerings | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Local libraries are participating in a statewide pool to buy a lot of new digital content in 2012 for increasingly popular electronic reading and listening devices.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

We're Still in Love With Books - The Chronicle of Higher Education

We're Still in Love With Books - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

http://t.co/RmdXQY3w. An ode to books and libraries by a writer who also embraces digital technologies.

 

"Contrary to many futuristic projections—even from bibliophiles who, as a group, enjoy melancholy reveries—the recent technological revolution has only deepened the affection that many scholars have for books and libraries, and highlighted the need for the preservation, study, and cherishing of both."

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

A Not Too Technical Explanation of XML in the library

A Not Too Technical Explanation of XML in the library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

At the heart of every librarian is the desire to organize information so that it is accessible; a library without a cataloging system is just a pile of books. ....

 

The challenge before librarians today is to take the seemingly unknowable expanse of electronic resources, and catalogue it so that it is available to users searching from many different portals, in different languages and in different platforms. In this present challenge, XML is the best option for organization and delivery of information. Once translated and catalogued under XML standards, the bibliographic information of any scanned text or object is comprehensive, with more depth and cataloguing detail than ever before. This in turn affects library applications such as inter library loans and the storing and accessing of digital libraries or archives.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Library Usage On The Rise Across Canada As Libraries Adapt To New Technology

Library Usage On The Rise Across Canada As Libraries Adapt To New Technology | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"MONTREAL - It's a sunny fall afternoon — likely one of the last warm days this year — yet Montreal's largest library is buzzing.The Grande Bibliotheque's rows of sofa chairs and sleek desks are packed with people tapping on laptops, flipping..."

 

"Despite the rise of smart phones and ebook readers, many Canadian libraries are busier than ever.

And the renaissance may be due in part to the very technology that was expected to threaten their existence.

Across the country, library usage is up 45 per cent over the past decade, from 16.6 to 24.1 transactions on average per capita, according to a recent report prepared by Lumos Research for the Canadian Urban Libraries Council.

Much of that growth has been driven by digital information.

The use of electronic databases more than doubled, and Internet visits to library websites and catalogues grew five-fold in the period, according to the report."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Facilitating Access to the Web of Data - a guide for librarians

Facilitating Access to the Web of Data - a guide for librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @magnusenger: "Facilitating Access to the Web of Data: A Guide for Librarians" http://t.co/vAoOKZiI"

 

"The web is changing from a web of documents to a web of data; from a web that can be read by humans, to one that can be read by machines. These are fascinating advances for anyone interested in the changing nature of the web and the way we access information. The technologies being forged in this new landscape will provide a host of opportunities for library and information professionals to shape the information landscape of the future."

 

"Key topics covered include:

• open data
• A semantic web: one that’s meaningful to computers
• data silos
• the semantic web: the RDF vision
• embedded semantics
• the library and the web of data
• the future of the librarian and the web of data."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Louder libraries for a digital age to open across U.S. | McClatchy

Louder libraries for a digital age to open across U.S. | McClatchy | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Imagine walking into a public library filled with PlayStations, Wii game consoles and electric keyboards pumped up to maximum volume. Teenagers are munching on snacks, checking out laptops and slouching on sofas or beanbags.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Physical libraries in a digital world

From 'Physical libraries in a digital world' http://t.co/uXwFKPZ5

...

"The final meeting of a Harvard course on the future of libraries, led by John Palfrey and Jeffrey Schnapp. They have three guests in to talk about physical library space."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Libraries throughout the world
Scoop.it!

Copyright Limitations and Exceptions for Libraries & Archives | IFLA

Copyright Limitations and Exceptions for Libraries & Archives | IFLA | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"To fulfil their mission, libraries need international copyright norms, together with limitations and exceptions. Legal flexibilities in copyright, known as limitations and exceptions, provide balance in a copyright system between users and creators of protected works."

 

"New technologies have created new opportunities for users to participate in an inclusive information society: Users moved from photocopying chapters from printed books to downloading chapters from e-books. Restrictive copyright laws continue to hamper access and reproduction of material for purposes of knowledge sharing.An updated system is needed to enable libraries to provide users with both historical and new services; in pace with ongoing technological changes, and to cooperate and share resources across national borders.

 

What is IFLA doing?

 

IFLA is working with WIPO Member States to gain support for a binding international instrument on copyright limitations and exceptions to enable libraries to preserve their collections, support education and research, and lend materials. To demonstrate what is needed, IFLA, together with the International Council on Archives (ICA), Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL) and Corporación Innovarte, has produced a Treaty proposal (‘TLIB') to guide WIPO's Member States in updating limitations and exceptions for libraries worldwide.

 

Find out more about limitations and exceptions for libraries at the following pages and learn what you can do to get involved supporting an international binding instrument that meets the needs of libraries in the 21st century."


Via Fabricio Cárdenas
more...
Karen du Toit's comment, November 21, 2011 4:13 AM
Thanks for this!
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The Myth of the Bookless Library | Inside Higher Ed

The Myth of the Bookless Library | Inside Higher Ed | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @IHEtech: Are "bookless #libraries" a myth?

 

"... academic libraries buy fewer and fewer books because the rent keeps going up. This rent, of course, is not for space – though that’s expensive, too. I’m talking about all that electronic stuff, the stuff that the would-be book burners and banners assume is free. When you know that a subscription you’ve been spending tens of thousands of dollars on will vanish if you fail to pay the rent, you trim where you can, and for the past thirty years, that’s been the book budget, which is more discretionary than those demanding subscriptions. No wonder university presses and other scholarly book publishers are banding together to license digital book collections by subscription. It seems the only way to guarantee your product will get into libraries is to charge a lot for something that disappears if you stop paying.

 

No matter how innovative the bookless library sounds, this isn't a situation we planned. If the academic library of the future is bookless, it won’t be because of vision. It will be because of the lack of it."

 

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/library-babel-fish/myth-bookless-library#ixzz1dwTmh8VA
Inside Higher Ed

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

What do Americans want from their libraries? Here’s our chance to find out | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

This study would be valuable worldwide as well: We will be following:

 

"What does your community want and need from a library? If you’re a librarian, chances are you’ve made efforts to find out, to strategically plan, to adjust services to local interests and changing needs.

What does your community want and need from a library? If you’re a librarian, chances are you’ve made efforts to find out, to strategically plan, to adjust services to local interests and changing needs. Rarely, though, do any of us get to see a broad view of our library community through the filter of independent data.

The Pew Internet & American Life Project is going to give us that view. Over the next three years, new research will investigate the role of libraries in the digital age, focusing on the ways libraries serve their users and their communities. Supported by a $1.4 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the study will be implemented by the Pew Internet Project, a nonpartisan “fact tank” that conducts nationwide surveys and qualitative research to help us understand the evolution of internet use."

The grant will allow researchers to concentrate on libraries in a way they never have before. “It’s enormously exciting to be doing something very focused on libraries and librarians because they are primary stakeholders of our work,” says Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Internet Project. “I know from all the conversations I’ve had with librarians how interested they are to find out where they stand in the world, what services people expect of them, and where they might fit into the world of ebooks.”

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from SocialLibrary
Scoop.it!

Check out the New Image Café!

Check out the New Image Café! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Great way to stir up interest in your local history or digital image collections. University of Houston's Image Cafe lets you browse and download images from their collection.

-via INFOdocket

 

Great way to create interest for libraries & archives as well!


Via Doug Mirams
more...
Karen du Toit's comment, January 4, 2012 2:35 AM
Thanks!
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Metadata an overview - Slideshare

a brief overview and introduction to metadata from how it is used on the web (including seo and tagging) to its use in Flickr and library catalogs.
more...
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2011: The Digital Library

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2011:  The Digital Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Audrey Watters:

"Part 5 of my year-end series. As far as ed-tech trends go, 2011 was not the year of the e-textbook.

-Hooray E-Books

-Boo Textbooks

-Digital Textbooks: Not Quite

-The Library Innovates

-Amazon versus the Publishers versus Libraries

-The Library as Community Learning Space"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

School Libraries Count! 2011 Supplemental Report | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

School Libraries Count! 2011 Supplemental Report | American Association of School Librarians (AASL) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

School Libraries Count!2011 supplementary report on digital citizenship http://t.co/qGuzTTWr...

AASL's National Longitudinal Survey of School Library Programs

Supplemental Report on Digital Citizenship

 

 

Key Highlights:

Traditional School Library Curriculum Carried Over Into Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship Curriculum

Digital Citizen Content

Access as Barrier to Teaching Digital Citizenship

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Some University students prefer digital assistance to librarian interaction

Some University students prefer digital assistance to librarian interaction | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

For some students, validity of information takes a backseat to ease of access.

"A two-year study of students’ research habits at five Illinois universities found that the majority of college students did most of their research with Google and did not properly use scholarly databases.

Caroline Barratt, director of the Miller Learning Center Library Commons, said with so much information available online, students may overlook the services the libraries provide.

“People may be overconfident about the results they find in a Google search,” Barratt said. “For example, Google can be really useful, but it is often the case that a librarian can find a better source for you that your professor will look on with approval.”

Kyle Boutte, a senior middle school education major from Athens, said she studies at the library but has never asked a librarian for assistance."

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

A People’s Digital Library and Prefigurative Politics

A People’s Digital Library and Prefigurative Politics | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

This is part one of a two part series.

"As a People’s Library librarian one question I get asked over and over again is why we don’t offer a digital library for our readers. It’s a good question and one I think is worth exploring in some detail.

To start, we have to address the question of what a digital library is— is it an institutional repository or archive? Is it a search engine for curated links? Or is it a virtual library? It’s an open question and one that I think different people can reasonably answer in radically different, but still valid, ways. A digital library can be and is all of those things.

And if by digital library you mean archive, there is one, and probably there are plenty more I don’t know about. OWS also has its own Archives group working to preserve the ephemera and other documents of the movement. So, in that sense, there is a digital library for Occupy Wall Street. But that doesn’t answer the question about bringing content to our readers.

The next question then is what the People’s Library takes as its mission. As a leaderless library, the question of mission is tough to answer; the mission is fluid depending on who is asking and who is answering. The simplest answer is that the People’s Library and the other occupation libraries exist to support both the full-time activists who live at the various occupations and the Occupy movement as a whole. We also exist to serve the local communities surrounding the occupations, whether in lower Manhattan, LA, or Washington, DC. Given that, a digital library seems a perfectly legitimate undertaking, especially after the raid and seizure of the books."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Bridges over the digital divide #libraries

Bridges over the digital divide #libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Libraries have been playing a key role in reducing isolation and improving job prospects among those with no internet access, writes David Batty."

 

"At a time when many local authorities have cut back on their library services, Brighton & Hove city council has made them central to improving its performance and the experience of service users.

The Council Connect project provides local residents who lack internet access or online skills with information technology training and support. This is aimed at enabling them to use other local authority services online more easily and develop skills useful for employment and in their personal lives.

The project began last year to bridge the divide between web-savvy local residents who save time and money by going online to pay council bills, resolve enquiries or arrange services, rather than visiting council offices, and those with no internet access or skills.

The council noted that the latter often live in more deprived communities or belong to more marginalised social groups, such as older people, those with mental health problems, unemployed people and some ethnic minorities."