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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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ICDL - International Children's Digital Library

ICDL - International Children's Digital Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

International Children's Digital Library (RT @deborahruf: Free online library for children.

 

"The mission of the International Children's Digital Library Foundation (ICDL Foundation) is to support the world's children in becoming effective members of the global community - who exhibit tolerance and respect for diverse cultures, languages and ideas -- by making the best in children's literature available online free of charge. The Foundation pursues its vision by building a digital library of outstanding children's books from around the world and supporting communities of children and adults in exploring and using this literature through innovative technology designed in close partnership with children for children."

 

"The ICDL Foundation is a non-profit corporation."

 

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If You Like Libraries, You’ll Love This Video! | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

If You Like Libraries, You’ll Love This Video! | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Larry Ferlazzo:

Just in case you haven't seen this yet: RT @PrincipalBerry: If You Like Libraries, You’ll Love This Video!

 

Funny library montage from movies & TV shows

 

 

 

 

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You know you are a 21st-century librarian when… - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog

You know you are a 21st-century librarian when… - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @jenniferlagarde: You know you are a 21st-century librarian when… http://t.co/rdoDA4VE #edtech #tlchat #edchat...

 

-You have to remind kindergarteners to turn off their smart phones before the story starts.

-You know what an IP number is but not an ISBN number.

-You have a student who does a better job troubleshooting the circulation system than the district technician.

-Your students think both The Princess and the Frog and Meet the Robinsons were written by Walt Disney.

-You know more librarians in Texas than you do in your home state because of your Personal Learning Network.

-The best way to remind a student about an overdue book through Facebook.

-You don’t talk in the teachers lounge about a project because it is not tied directly to a state test.

-When answering a reference question, you head to an Internet terminal.

-You’ve started dressing like your avatar.

-Kids look at you funny when you call it the “the card catalog.

-”You have more polo shirts with computer logos than you do book logos - and 25% of your wardrobe comes from vendor booths at conferences.

-Your students want to read the most popular YA lit on their phones.

-Your students show you how to get around the district Internet filter so you can teach a lesson.

-Your aid spends more time troubleshooting the network than reshelving books.

-You never see anyone copy out of the print encyclopedia anymore.

-Your index finger has a callous from tapping the interactive white board.

-You didn’t get your last grad class assignment turned in on time because the network was down.

-You’ve Googled the new teachers in your building - and all the kids have Googled you.

-You don’t remember the last time you’ve had to alphabetize something.

-You have all your passwords and PIN numbers are on your PDA - and you can’t remember the password for your PDA!

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Advanced Google Image Search -Finding Creative Commons Images

Learn how to find free copyright images using Google Advanced Search.


Via k3hamilton, Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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SABC Media Libraries: What do you do when you see a QR code?

SABC Media Libraries: What do you do when you see a QR code? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

How to scan a QR code.

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Undaimonia: Help! How much help should libraries be? by @SimonXIX

Undaimonia: Help! How much help should libraries be? by @SimonXIX | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

@SimonXIX's latest blog post http://t.co/xKkReJDL...

 

"The question comes down to: how do libraries best help people? Is it by addressing their short-term need for information or is it by addressing their long-term need for information literacy? And who gets to make this decision: the librarians; the students; the university management? And since ‘helping’ is part of a library’s raison d’être, the question of what level of help to provide leads to the question of what a library’s purpose is. Bob Usherwood wrote a great post for Voices for the Library about the purpose of public libraries and their corresponding level of help. Do we need to ask the same existential questions for academic libraries?"

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SABC Media Libraries: QR code for the SABC Media Library's blog

SABC Media Libraries: QR code for the SABC Media Library's blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

How to create a QR code via The Daring Librarian & the SABC Media Library's first QR code for their blog on mobile.

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BlogJunction » Blog Archive » The Why and What of Storytelling for Libraries

BlogJunction » Blog Archive » The Why and What of Storytelling for Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Betha's post about yesterday's Organizational Storytelling for Librarians webinar #libstory http://t.co/xoMB6MVu...

Tuesday’s webinar on Organizational Storytelling for Librarians answered two burning questions about the topic: why the library should use storytelling and what makes a good story.
[Photo: Pawnee Story Bundle, courtesy of Kansas Historical Society]

 

Entire webinar here: http://www.webjunction.org/events/webinars/webinar-archives/-/articles/content/132383604

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For Reading and Learning, Kids Prefer E-Books to Print Books | Digital Book World | School Librarian In Action @ Scoop It!

For Reading and Learning, Kids Prefer E-Books to Print Books | Digital Book World | School Librarian In Action @ Scoop It! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A new study suggests that children prefer e-books to print books and that they retain and comprehend an equal amount of information from both print- and e-books."

 

"A new “QuickStudy” – so named for its short duration and the small size of its sample group – from the Joan Ganz Cooney Center observed 24 families with children ranging in age from three-to-six reading both print and e-books in the Summer and Fall of 2011. Most of the children in the study preferred reading an e-book to a print book and comprehension between the two formats were the same.

“If we can encourage kids to engage in books through an iPad, that’s a win already,” said Carly Shuler, senior consultant for industry studies at the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop is a New York based non-profit organization dedicated to understanding how children learn through digital media."

Read more at DigitalBookWorld.com: For Reading and Learning, Kids Prefer E-Books to Print Books | Digital Book World http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2012/for-reading-and-learning-kids-prefer-e-books-to-print-books/#ixzz1j8QPvsIc

 

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Milwaukee Public Library's Brilliant Ad Campaign To Get People Reading More Books

Milwaukee Public Library's Brilliant Ad Campaign To Get People Reading More Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Milwaukee Public Library's Brilliant Ad Campaign To Get People Reading More Books: Love this.

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Can’t tweet or won’t tweet? What are the reasons behind low adoption of web 2.0 tools by researchers? | Impact of Social Sciences

Can’t tweet or won’t tweet? What are the reasons behind low adoption of web 2.0 tools by researchers? | Impact of Social Sciences | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Cheryl Brown:

 

"So why aren’t researchers using web 2.0 tools more? Broadly speaking, the reasons fall under three categories: researchers don’t know that the tools exist, researchers are unable to use them, or researchers choose not to use them. In this last category, the reluctance can spring from:

- lack of time to try new tools and lack of institutional incentives to make time to use them;

- their value not being made clear or the tools not being seen as credible;

- concerns around sharing ideas and data online;

 

For researchers in developing countries there are also serious legal, cultural, technological, and language barriers to adopting web 2.0 tools for collaboration and knowledge-sharing."

 


Via Dailin Shaido
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Karen du Toit's comment, January 10, 2012 6:44 AM
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Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert

Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"Learners are doers, not recipients."—Walter J.

 

"Learning" no longer means sitting passively in a lecture hall or on in front of a television or in a library and waiting to receive the "authoritative" version of what the experts think is up as if it were a Communion wafer.

For nearly 20 years we have had the Internet, now grown into a medium of almost infinite paths, where "learning" means that you can Twitter directly to people in Egypt to ask them what they really think about ElBaradei (and get answers), ask an author or critic to address a point you feel he may have missed (ditto), or share your own insights in countless forums where they will be read and admired (and/or savaged.) Knowledge is growing more broadly and immediately participatory and collaborative by the moment."

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How should Libraries prepare for eBooks and mobile devices?

Mandy Callow and Kaye England (2011)  Preparing your library for mobile devices m-libraries Conference, 11 – 13 May, 2011

This paper had its beginnings in a discussion at the USQ Library...

 

Get full paper here: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/19095/1/Callow_England_m-libraries_2011_AV.pdf

 

Quote from the last paragraph:

"Even though the idea of a mobile device has been around for a considerable period of time and was forecast as early as 1978 by Becker (p.412) who said "in time individuals may have a small information terminal. Much like a pocket electronic calculator, which will bring individual information messages on command"…, when it comes to mobile delivery, the Library world in many ways isn‟t ready for it. This includes our vendors, our institutions, our staff, and our students. It is up to us to try to rectify this. We need to investigate technologies, we need to expose staff to technologies, we need to educate students on using technologies, we need to be advocates for mobile platforms and delivery to our vendors and institutions. We are our own worst enemy. We spend so much time doing the daily grind, that we don‟t give time and resources to developing, researching and educating. How many libraries have staff who are dedicated, at least partly, to investigating new and developing technologies and how they can be applied to the Library?

Whilst staff may be overwhelmed by the rapid pace of technological change – as one staff put it "Stop the electronic advance, it‟s snowballing me!" we cannot afford to ignore new

technologies. From this project we have learnt that in order to provide a usable Library, it is vital to educate both staff and students, particularly in new and emerging technologies and resources. With eBooks and mobile devices we have only touched on one small aspect of technology. We need to investigate other technologies (such as QR codes) and resources which staff and students are unfamiliar with and unsure about, and develop appropriate training and promotional plans. We cannot assume (like our system staff have) that users and staff will become familiar with new technologies as their use in society becomes commonplace."

 

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Strike Against Sopa! 18 Jan 2011

Strike Against Sopa! 18 Jan 2011 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Internet goes on strike — blackout everywhere. This Wed Jan 18, many of your favorites sites will be unavailable to you to stop web censorship. Tell everyone, petition even more sites to join.

 

Sites are striking in all different ways, but they are united by this: do the biggest thing you possibly can, and drive contacts to Congress. Put this on your site or automate it by putting this JS into your header, which will start the blackout at 8AM EST and end at 8PM EST."

 

 

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New Report: "Social Metadata for LAMs. Part 2: Site Reviews" [OCLC]

Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Part 2: Survey Analysis.

 

"DUBLIN, Ohio, USA, 16 January 2012—This report analyzes the results from a social metadata survey that focused on the motivations for creating a website, moderation policies, staffing and site management, technologies used, and criteria for assessing success.

Metadata helps users locate resources that meet their specific needs. But metadata also helps us to understand the data we find and helps us to evaluate what we should spend our time on. Traditionally, staff at libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) create metadata for the content they manage. However, social metadata—content contributed by users—is evolving as a way to both augment and recontexutalize the content and metadata created by LAMs. Many cultural heritage institutions are interested in gaining a better understanding of social metadata and also learning how to best utilize their users' expertise to enrich their descriptive metadata and improve their users' experiences."

 

Report here: http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2011/2011-03r.htm

 

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Library Research Service| Public Libraries | Public Libraries and Web Technologies

Observational study of web technologies used by public libraries in the United States.

"In spring 2008, LRS undertook an observational study to assess the prevalence of certain web technologies in Public Libraries in the United States.

We repeated the study in spring 2010, including more libraries and newer technologies. Take a look at the reports below to find out what changed in the two years between studies, and to learn some of the differences between libraries that use web technologies and those that don't."

 

Publications here: http://www.lrs.org/public/webtech/

 

 

 

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Using tablet computers, e-libraries, and family literacy initiatives to encourage young children to read | LLRX.com

Using tablet computers, e-libraries, and family literacy initiatives to encourage young children to read | LLRX.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"David H. Rothman continues to articulate and comprehensively document the case that a public national digital library system should serve people of all income levels and all ages, centenarians included.

 

Recommendation #1: Aim for a mix of electronic and paper books

Recommendation #2: Investigate the efficacy not just of different kinds of e-book content but also of ways to use it

Recommendation #3: Strive for appropriate hardware, software, and connectivity

 

Needed more than ever--and not just for the disadvantaged"

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Preprint: Mobile Technologies & Academics: Do Students Use Mobile Technology in their Academic Lives and are Librarians Ready to Meet this New Challenge?

Title
Mobile Technologies & Academics: Do Students Use Mobile Technology in their Academic Lives and are Librarians Ready to Meet this New Challenge? (Preprint)

Authors
Angela Dresselhaus & Flora Shrode

"In this paper we report on two surveys and offer an introductory plan that librarians may use to begin implementing mobile access to selected library databases and services. Results from the first survey helped us to gain insight into where students at Utah State University (USU) in Logan, Utah stands regarding their use of mobile devices for academic activities in general and their desire for access to library services and resources in particular. A second survey that we conducted with librarians gave us an idea of the extent to which responding libraries offer mobile access, their future plans for mobile implementation, and librarians’ opinions about whether and how mobile technologies may be useful to library patrons. In the last segment of the paper, we outline steps librarians can take as they “go mobile.”

 

Full text: http://www.ala.org/lita/ital/sites/ala.org.lita.ital/files/content/prepub/dresselhaus.pdf

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