The Information P...
Follow
Find tag "future-of-libraries"
16.9K views | +0 today
The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

10 questions about books, libraries, librarians, and schools, by Scott McLeod

10 questions about books, libraries, librarians, and schools, by Scott McLeod | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

BY SCOTT MCLEOD:

"October apparently was ‘Library Month’ for me. I was the keynote speaker for the Minnesota MEMO conference and did a breakout session for the Iowa Library Association (ILA) conference. I also brought Dr. Mike Eisenberg to Iowa for three days to talk with school administrators about technology and information literacy. As a result, I’ve been reflecting a lot lately on books, reading, and the future of libraries and librarians…"

"Random questions

What constitutes a “book” these days? When books become electronic and thus become searchable, hyperlinkable, more accessible to readers with disabilities, and able to embed audio, video, and interactive maps and graphics, at what point do they stop becoming “books” and start becoming something else?"...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Phil Bradley's weblog: Libraries, books, ebooks and the future

Phil Bradley's weblog: Libraries, books, ebooks and the future | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
There's a text version and 2 videos totaling 24 minutes below. There’s a phrase that I use every now and then; “It’s like dancing on quick sand” and never was it more appropriate than right now in respect of the eBook arena.

 

"Let’s look at the latest news. A new low cost eBook reader has been unveiled by txtr, a German eBook retail platform...

 

Oyster, which is a new startup has raised $3 million in order to become the ‘Spotify of books’....

 

HarperCollins is launching a new global publishing system which will provide them with an infrastructure that allows them to maximise it’s catalogue of books, eBooks and apps...

 

The final news item that’s caught my eye, and I assume has also caught yours is that Amazon is going to launch their lending service in the UK by the end of the month..."

 

[...]

"We are at an absolutely pivotal point within both our profession, and within the library service in the UK. I recently talked to an ex-librarian who has since left the profession, and she said ‘I’m glad I got out, we’re finished’. That is so patently not the case it’s painful. This is a superb time to be a professional, or to have a love of libraries, of reading, books and knowledge. This is because we are going to be able to shape the development of all of those things into the future. What we do now is going to set a pattern for the next 50 or 100 years. We just need to believe in the power that the information professionals have, and the key role that libraries play in society. But – and this is a big but, we can only do it if we all work together, because it’s only by holding out our hands to one another in trust that we can help drag ourselves out of the quicksand, rather than push each other under faster."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Future Librarian
Scoop.it!

The New Librarianship Worldview, by R David Lankes

"Your worldview dictates what is possible and often without even knowing it. Presentation at the Library 2.012 conference. Describes the rising view within librarinship focused on knowledge and community."

 


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Will Public Libraries Become Extinct? - Forbes

Will Public Libraries Become Extinct? - Forbes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Marc Bodnick:

"Will public libraries become extinct? This question was originally answered on Quora by Erica Friedman and Marc Bodnick."

 

[...]

 "the obvious:

Libraries provide many services, yes, but the most important service is lending books. Tablets & eReaders are a much better way to get a book than borrowing it or buying it at a bookstore. You can get the book right away, the split second you want it! More, and more, and more people are going to buy tablet devices & eReaders over the next ten years. Power readers are disproportionately more likely to buy tablets & eReaders. Anyone who really loves reading, buying, and borrowing books is likely going to buy an eReader. Once you really start enjoy reading on a Kindle or iPad, your interest in visiting a bookstore or library goes down precipitously. Buying a book cheaply on your Kindle or iPad is so much better than (1) go to a library, (2) cross-fingers hope they have the book in stock, (3) borrow the book, (4) read it, (5) remember to return it, and (6) drive back to the library to return it. That’s a lot of work."

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

TLC's Lists & Actions for Librarians on the Go - InfoToday.com

TLC's Lists & Actions for Librarians on the Go - InfoToday.com

"The LS2 Staff interface is a touchscreen-optimized, tablet-friendly design that allows a librarian to leave his or her desk and perform circulation tasks anywhere in the library.

The new Lists & Actions tab leverages this mobility to provide lists of items and associated transaction data wherever it’s needed using an array of filters associated with MARC record data and circulation statistics. Each selected filter opens a range of options to help narrow down the search. Librarians can view saved pick lists, create weeding lists on the fly, or limit collections from within the stacks, in the workroom, or anywhere in the library by any number of filters and variables.

Data from lists and saved searches can be exported to a spreadsheet, added to an existing list, or used to create new lists. Each filter has options available for further narrowing a search, and each column in the results table can be rearranged, resized, sorted, or deleted to customize a user’s list or saved search.

Source: The Library Corporation"

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Libraries as Sites of Enchantment, Participatory Culture, and Learning
Scoop.it!

Project Profiles Your Friendly Neighborhood Library: An Inviting Space, a Family Place

Project Profiles Your Friendly Neighborhood Library: An Inviting Space, a Family Place | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Stacey A. Aldrich:

"When an initiative known as Family Place introduced a new children’s programming model that encourages libraries to go beyond summer reading programs and story hours to reach their full potential as community hubs, the California State Library took notice.

As a collaboration that began in 1996 between New York’s Middle Country Public Library and the now-defunct nonprofit Libraries for the Future, the Family Place model promotes spaces within libraries that focus on the learning and literacy of children ages 0–3, while also supporting the needs of the entire family. Family Place principles have now been refined and translated into a replicable framework that gives all libraries the chance to look at their children’s services in a fresh way. More than 300 sites in 23 states are currently part of the expanding Family Place Libraries network.

Stacey Aldrich, state librarian for the California State Library, was impressed by Family Place when she was introduced to the concept through Libraries for the Future.

"Family Place is amazing," says Aldrich. "They really make libraries think about the environments they’re creating for families. Family Place library spaces are designed for the family to fully engage and interact—parents and caregivers, as well as children."


Via Buffy J. Hamilton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from SocialLibrary
Scoop.it!

“Come Write In” library programs for NaNoWriMo | Library as Incubator Project

“Come Write In” library programs for NaNoWriMo | Library as Incubator Project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The “Come Write In” initiative is a sub-program of NaNoWriMo that encourages writers, or Wrimos, to use libraries as writing studios during NaNoWriMo. The initiative is part active programming, part marketing campaign – meaning that libraries can get involved to whatever degree they are comfortable with and however works best for their programming schedule"

 

> Great initiative for libraries of the future!


Via Buffy J. Hamilton, Doug Mirams
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Learning to Thrive in a Culture of Change - how to geek your library

Learning to Thrive in a Culture of Change - how to geek your library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Amanda Clay Powers 

 

"The future of libraries is caught up in our ability to change and continually respond to the rapid changes around us. But in order to have meaningful change that will make our libraries thrive, rather than continually exhausting our resources, we have to find a way to discriminate among the changes we could make, implement the ones that make sense, and then keep them going while we continually evaluate them. But how can we ever keep up? And how can we become the libraries of the future when we are relied upon to be pillars of our communities, not revolutionaries? Well, lean in. I’m going to share with you the secrets I’ve learned from five years of applying social technologies in an academic library.

First—find yourself a geek with good tech radar and listen to her. Second, bring new ideas into the library any way you can. Third, set up a system to evaluate the resulting innovations that emerge from your library staff so you can sustain them. That’s it."

 

STEP ONE: CREATE YOUR GEEK FILTER COMMITTEE

STEP 2: BUILD A BROAD CONSENSUS


 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The bookless library – Is that the future of libraries? | ePublish a Book

The bookless library – Is that the future of libraries? | ePublish a Book | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The bookless library is increasing a reality, staring in places meant to be the repository of knowledge, university libraries, and gaining ground outside academic grounds.
The New York Public Library is implementing its plan to move many of its books away from its main branch into offsite storage with 24-hour advance request required. Yet it is not the first library to do so. Opening the move was Kansas State University’s engineering school, which went bookless 12 years ago. The University of Texas at San Antonio ditched print for e-books and e-journals in 2010. Stanford University’s engineering school pruned 85 percent of its books last year. Drexel University opened a new library just last month with hardly a single print book – just rows and rows of computers. And Cornell recently announced a similar initiative." 

 

Read more: http://www.epublishabook.com/2012/08/31/the-bookless-library-is-that-the-future-of-libraries/#ixzz257b6gIeO


Under Creative Commons License: Attribution No Derivatives

more...
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

A Bold Future for Public Libraries | Public Libraries of New Zealand

A Bold Future for Public Libraries | Public Libraries of New Zealand | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @lianzaoffice: Strategic Framework for NZ Public Libraries promises a bold future.

 

"Public Libraries of New Zealand - A Strategic Framework 2012 - 2017" charts the future of public libraries in New Zealand. It is designed to help libraries, and their local councils to extend their services through new technology, and improve their efficiency through partnerships and alliances.

It addresses the challenges that public libraries face in meeting the changing needs of their communities. There has been a significant shift in how people access information and interact in a digital environment. Public Libraries are responding to these changes by using technologies to deliver their purpose in new ways. This means access anywhere, anytime, via smart phone or computer, having E-books to download for free, helping local groups to record and store local history digitally so that it can be both preserved and shared, and giving people access to unique New Zealand treasures stored in other places.

 

Framework here: http://www.publiclibrariesofnewzealand.org.nz/strategicframework

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The library's future in a digital world - Saugerties Public Library's director Sukrit Goswani

The library's future in a digital world - Saugerties Public Library's director Sukrit Goswani | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by SHARYN FLANAGAN:

"Interview with library director Sukrit Goswami. The subject? The future of libraries in an increasingly digital world:

[...]

"What are people interested in and what programs are they signing up for?

Up to now we’ve been letting the community tell us what they want, just putting the programs out there in front of them and letting them choose. The most popular are the health-related programs, particularly the yoga and fitness classes, and also the educational programs; people love those. Our own staff teaches the computer programs, and in the coming year we want to offer resume building workshops and classes for job seekers on how to write cover letters. I’ve taught these when I was at Glens Falls [library], and I love teaching classes, but can’t now due to time constraints.

We are constantly expanding our services and programs, and we do three to four teen programs a week now, too, that are all well attended. We have increased storytime for children, adding one session to Saturdays for parents who work on weekdays, and that’s been very successful."

 

Full interview here:: http://www.saugertiesx.com/2012/08/16/librarys-future-digital-world/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Libraries as Sites of Enchantment, Participatory Culture, and Learning
Scoop.it!

Cafe Poets at Melbourne City Library | Library as Incubator Project

Cafe Poets at Melbourne City Library | Library as Incubator Project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"One-off performances and workshops by poets, musicians, and other entertainers are hugely popular in libraries and serve as valuable additions to a library’s program roster. But long-term partnerships or residencies mean that an artist works closely with a library to facilitate a suite of programs, integrating inspiring performances with hands-on learning opportunities. Artists-in-residence may be visual artists, writers, or performers.

An excellent example of a poet-in-residence program is found in the Cafe Poet project in Australia. Established by Australian Poetry in 2009, the Cafe Poet program “aims to promote poetry while strengthening community relationships.” So far about fifty poets have been placed in cafes, bookshops, and, in the City of Melbourne’s case, the City Library.

The exchange is beneficial for everyone: poets are given space to write (and complimentary tea/coffee), as well as the chance to engage with their community; the host gets to be part of the poetry community, plan events in conjunction with the poet, and (hopefully) increase foot traffic."


Via Buffy J. Hamilton
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Private Library labours to be relevant again - New York Times

Private Library labours to be relevant again - New York Times | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Private Library Labors to Be Relevant AgainNew York TimesPublished: August 7, 2012.

 

[...] "the Huntington Free Library and Reading Room in the Bronx [...]

trying to reinvent itself in a more humble role: that of a traditional community library.

It still does not lend books and it remains privately owned and operated. But instead of catering to scholars studying American Indians, it now hosts monthly meetings about Bronx history. It invites children for arts and crafts, and it organizes an annual scavenger hunt for historical artifacts. Last month, it allowed HBO to make over its reading room as a backdrop for the series “Boardwalk Empire.”

“We don’t want to be ‘This is what a library used to look like,’ ” said Thomas X. Casey, the library’s president. “We want to be an active participant in the community, not just a museum.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

» University Librarians on Ebooks, Special Collections, and the Future of Academic Libraries

» University Librarians on Ebooks, Special Collections, and the Future of Academic Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Public Services Librarian Emily Couvillon took the time to share her opinions and observations of technology's role in engaging students, teachers, and administrators alike. And, of course, some books she thinks students should pick up and check out."

———
"Chris Galloway is a friend of mine who works as a library manager at University of Houston who also kindly shared his expert opinions on the topics at hand. He even queried some of his coworkers for a more in-depth look at what other Coogs think of M.D. Anderson's present and future! Perhaps I'm biased when I say this, but Chris also boasts pretty great taste in literature, so it's probably a good idea to listen to his recommendations."

 

Questions that were answered:

1. "How popular are ebooks at Doherty? Do you provide readers for students?

2. What are some of your recommended reads for students? Any for freshmen and non-traditionals in particular?

3. Where do you see things at Doherty headed within the next few years?

4. What upcoming releases are you and the other librarians excited about? Will they be recommended to the acquisitions department?

5. What are some of your favorite holdings in the University's special collections?"

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Hackerspaces as 21st Century Libraries, by Ryan McDermott

Ryan McDermott explains hackerspaces as the 21st century library.youtube.com...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Envisioning the library of the future - online survey

Online survey:

 

"This website aims to capture your views on the purpose and value of public libraries.

This is part of a piece of research entitled Envisioning the library of the future, commissioned by Arts Council England. This programme of research will inform the development of the Arts Council’s long-term vision for public libraries in England. This research began in February 2012, with the findings due to be published in a final report in the Autumn 2012.

Along with this online element, we are also undertaking focused research in face-to-face workshops with members of the public in various parts of the country so that we have a wide range of people contributing to our discussion and developing ideas.

The website is open for receiving your comments until Sunday 21 October 2012."

 

Envisioning the library of the future: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/supporting-libraries/libraries-consultation

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from LibraryLinks LiensBiblio
Scoop.it!

Career Services at the Library without Spending a Dime | Lead the Change

Career Services at the Library without Spending a Dime | Lead the Change | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

“People comment that they prefer coming to the library [rather than the OneStop]. It’s welcoming; it’s open; it’s easy to deal with,” Poland said. “The OneStops had this feel of the unemployment office.” Besides that positive atmosphere (and potentially less stigma), the library is centrally located, and already attracts high traffic, likely making more people aware of the services. (The reverse is true as well: Poland says the services are bringing new people into the library.)

 

But the library location’s most important advantage to CTWorks is what Poland calls “wraparound services”: the career agents refer their clients to the library-offered citizenship resources, language classes, and digital literacy help as needed. “Where better to do that than the library? It’s where we do it anyway,” Poland commented.

 

-Meredith Schwartz


Via Robin Illsley
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

21st-century-libraries, changing forms, changing futures, by Ken Worpole

This document was already out on 18 January 2011, but the findings and conclusions still seems relevant:

 

"A number of significant trends are evident:
• In future, it is likely that more libraries will be developed in partnership with other organisations or services, whether commercial supermarkets or adult education providers
• Greater adaptability may be required in areas such as internal design, circulation, access
and hours of services in library buildings, even though the buildings themselves are only
a part of wider library services delivered through many physical and electronic media
• Libraries could become key communications centres for mobile populations, and their design will need to reflect different ‘levels and layers of entry’ or different temporal
zones: hot-desking, browsing, long-term study
• As the need for lifelong learning continues to increase, long stay use of libraries for
study purposes will require more friendly and efficient support services - toilets,
catering, recreational quiet zones – meaning that libraries are likely to become more
like members’ clubs
• Electronic links between homes and libraries are likely to increase, so that the library service and the ‘customer’ are in constant contact with each other as and when required
• Children’s services may grow in importance as the library becomes a secure, supervised, electronic safe haven in the city, and as government investment in early years provision continues to grow
• Virtual library services could be provided 24 hours a day, while other services
will be offered out of hours"

 

Pdf document here: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110118095356/http:/www.cabe.org.uk/files/21st-century-libraries.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Reconceptualising the School Library as Collaborative Makerspace | Services to Schools

Reconceptualising the School Library as Collaborative Makerspace | Services to Schools | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Peter M
"According to leading educational thinker, Sir Ken Robinson, in order to meet the challenges of living and working in the 21st century, we need to deliberately and systematically create spaces and processes in our schools that foster creativity and innovation. We shouldn’t be anaesthetising our children, he argues, we should be waking them up."

[...]

"Since 2009, a growing wave of library ‘makerspaces’ have emerged in public libraries, museums and community facilities in the United States to foster collaboration and creativity. Focussing particularly on engaging and inspiring teens and pre-teens, it is only very recently however that the ‘makerspace’ model has been considered as a good fit for school libraries.
A ‘makerspace’ is a collaborative learning environment where young people can come together to explore their own interests, learn to use tools and materials, and develop creative projects. They are dynamic workshop spaces for creative multimedia learning and doing. Not so much defined by the space or the specific activities but by a mindset of collaboration and creativity."

[...]

"It is essential that school leaders apply the same spirit of innovation and future focus to the re-imagination of their school library environments as they do to other aspects of both their built and virtual school environment. Library as creative collaborative makerspace is an exciting, transformative idea that warrants exploration."

 

Read more: http://www.schools.natlib.govt.nz/blogs/libraries-and-learning/12-09/reconceptualising-school-library-collaborative-makerspace

more...
No comment yet.