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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Futurist Thomas Frey:

"Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books.
Libraries exist to give us access to information. Until recently, books were one of the more efficient forms of transferring information from one person to another. Today there are 17 basic forms of information that are taking the place of books, and in the future there will be many more…"

 

"Here is a list of 17 primary categories of information that people turn to on a daily basis. While they are not direct replacements for physical books, they all have a way of eroding our reliance on them. There may be more that I’ve missed, but as you think through the following media channels, you’ll begin to understand how libraries of the future will need to function:
Games 
Digital Books 
Audio Books 
Magazines 
Music 
Photos 
Videos 
Television 
Movies
Radio 
Blogs 
Podcasts 
Apps 
Presentations 
Courseware 
Personal Networks 
Each of these forms of information has a place in future libraries. Whether or not physical books decline or even disappear has little relevance in the overall scheme of future library operations."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"People who think libraries are going away simply because books are going digital are missing the true tectonic shifts taking place in the world of information.


Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books."

 

"Libraries have always had a mandate to archive the records of their service area, but it has rarely been pursued with more than passing enthusiasm. Archives of city council meetings and local history books made the cut, but few considered the library to be a good photo or video archive.
Over time, many of the newspapers, radio, and television stations will begin to disappear. As these businesses lose their viability, their storerooms of historical broadcast tapes and documents will need to be preserved. More specifically, every radio broadcast, newspaper, and television broadcast will need to be digitized and archived.
With the advent of iCloud and other similar services libraries will want to expand their hosting of original collections, and installing the equipment to digitize the information. The sale of this information to the outside world through an iTunes-like service could become a valuable income stream for libraries in the future.
Final Thoughts
Libraries, much like any living breathing organism, will have to adapt to the complex nature of the ever-changing world of information. As information becomes more sophisticated and complex, so will libraries.
Libraries are here to stay because they have a survival instinct. They have created a mutually dependent relationship with the communities they serve, and most importantly, they know how to adapt to the changing world around them.
I am always impressed with the creative things being done in libraries. As Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” There are a lot of beautiful dreams taking place that will help form tomorrow’s libraries."
By Futurist Thomas Frey


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Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica

Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Chris Foreman:

Ars Technica"One of the biggest challenges in the field of digital librarianship is simply trying to evolve as fast as technology," Pike said, "because we need to also keep up..."

 

Robin Pike (certified archivist currently serving as a Digital Collections Librarian at the University of Maryland):

"We are the custodians of what has been created and are enabling access—ideally free and unlimited—for the future," Pike said. "No matter what is created and where it is created, if it is important, some librarian, archivist, or records manager is capturing it and saving it for the future. In addition to saving the digital objects, we need to make them accessible so people can use and reuse the materials."

"We are the custodians of human history."


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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LIS Trends: New IMLS Report: “Libraries and Museums in an Era of participatory culture"

LIS Trends: New IMLS Report: “Libraries and Museums in an Era of participatory culture" | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"New from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Salzburg Global Seminar.

From the Summary Announcement:

The report details the events of the October, 2011 convening of fifty-eight library, museum, and cultural heritage leaders from thirty-one countries. Together, the participants developed a set of recommendations to help libraries and museums embrace new possibilities for public engagement that are made possible by societal and technological change.

The deliberations identified “imperatives for the future” including accepting the notion of democratic access, placing a major emphasis on public value and impact, and embracing lifelong learning.

Building on the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) initiative The Future of Museums and Libraries as well as on past museum and library sessions convened by the Salzburg Global Seminar, this session brought together library and museum leaders, cultural and educational policymakers, cultural sector researchers, representatives of library and museum education programs, technology experts, sociologists, journalists, and library and museum associations.

The report captures rich perspectives about the changing roles and responsibilities of libraries and museums. The publication describes each of the five plenary sessions and the working group recommendations that resulted from them: culture and communities; learning transformed; building the skills of library and museum professionals; and demonstrating public value. It includes descriptions of innovative case studies from around the globe and a summary of the concluding keynote lecture given by Vishakha Desia, president and chief executive officer of the Asia Society.

 

Full Summary Announcement: http://www.imls.gov/new_report_explores_roles_of_libraries_and_museums_in_an_era_of_participatory_culture.aspx

 

 

17 pages report in PDF available from IMLS:
Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture

http://www.imls.gov/assets/1/AssetManager/SGS_Report_2012.pdf

 

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Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes

Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

R David Lankes:

A librarian plays devil's advocate for those who argue libraries are obsolete (but there is a happy ending).

 

"There are few of us who can know the exact moment their career ended. However when a professor of library science argues libraries are obsolete against a Harvard law school professor and the head of the lead funding agency in the field I think that moment has arrived. This was where I found myself April 18th when I took part in an Oxford-style debate as part of Harvard Library Strategic Conversations. The idea was to mix humor with serious debate on the proposition that “Libraries are Obsolete.” I was asked to argue for the proposition.Now this is a rather odd position to be in since I have spent my career arguing exactly the opposite, but in the spirit of playing devil’s advocate, and the fact that I have tenure, I jumped in. After all, if we don’t honestly debate the point, how can we truly be sure we are not headed towards obsolescence [more on my rational see this post]."

http://quartz.syr.edu/blog/?p=1557

 


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Attila the Archivist: Archives and the future

Arlene Schmuland:

"Attila the Archivist: Archives and the future http://t.co/fZecgSMK Awesome post from my high school pal Arlene #aiim #ecm"

 

"Here's what I think are some of the considerations that we need to have in both designing a vision and designing the strategic plan that allows you to reach the goals of the vision:

Flexibility.
Change.
Commitment to the vision and goals from existing stakeholders.
Assessment.
Daydreaming.
Transparency.
Document, document, document. Write down the processes. Write down the procedures. The boss wins.
Remember the why.
Balance tact with necessity.
Advocacy.
Staying open.
Focus.
Stay user-centric.
And that, I think, is how you begin to craft the future of archives and special collections and of academic libraries, together."

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The Once and Future Library | American Libraries Magazine

The Once and Future Library | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Charles G. Mueller
An architect’s perspective on designing for changing constituencies

 

"To some librarians it must seem like a perfect storm: Budgets are being slashed, ebooks suddenly are outselling their print ancestors, electronic movies on demand are slowing over-the-counter DVD lending..."

"Besides librarians, architects are among the people most concerned about how, and how rapidly, such trends play out. Plans made a year ago for library additions or even modest renovations—never mind an entirely new building—are probably out of date. Longstanding formulas to calculate the space required for stacks, seating, and even computer stations no longer apply. The library standards codified in many states, often a criterion for funding, would probably result in a library design that is larger than necessary, or certainly too big or too small in all the wrong places."

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A Pinterest Contest for the ‘New Librarian’

A Pinterest Contest for the ‘New Librarian’ | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Kelly Lux:

"The iSchool wants to know how you define the future of librarianship. What are you doing to define librarianship of the future? What do you envision the future of libraries to be? What are the ideas that have inspired you? If you are a librarian, a student of librarianship, or if you have a passion for the future of libraries, we want to hear from you!

Create a Future of Librarianship Pinterest Board and collect your ideas. Then, send your Board url to the iSchool for a chance to win The Atlas of New Librarianship (just awarded Best Book in Library Literature by ALA!) by David Lankes. Entries will be accepted through Monday, March 19. The top 10 boards will be posted on the iSchool’s website and the three winners will be chosen by public vote. For all you good librarians who already own a copy of Dave’s awesome book – no worries – there’s a prize to be had for you too!"

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Beyond books: what it takes to be a 21st century librarian

Beyond books: what it takes to be a 21st century librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Emma Cragg and Katie Birkwood:

 

"From connecting with people to keeping up with the latest technologies, there is a whole lot more to the job than stamping due dates..."

 

"Books are only one aspect of what libraries and librarians are about. Librarianship is a people profession; a librarian's job is to connect people with the information they are seeking, whatever format that may take.

At their heart, all library jobs have a central purpose: to help people access and use information, for education, for work, or for pleasure. In all library roles customer service and communication skills are important. If anyone ever thought they'd become a librarian because they liked books or reading, they would be sorely disappointed if they did not also like people too. Libraries of all kinds are keen to demonstrate their value to as wide an audience as possible, and to open up access to culturally significant resources that they hold."

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What You (Really) Need to Know

What You (Really) Need to Know | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The digital age has changed more than how we learn. It’s changed what we need to learn.

 

By LAWRENCE H. SUMMERS:

"Suppose the educational system is drastically altered to reflect the structure of society and what we now understand about how people learn.

How will what universities teach be different?

Here are some guesses and hopes."

"1. Education will be more about how to process and use information and less about imparting it. This is a consequence of both the proliferation of knowledge — and how much of it any student can truly absorb — and changes in technology..."

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The Revolution Isn’t Just Digital | American Libraries Magazine

The Revolution Isn’t Just Digital | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

ALAN S. INOUYE: The impact of the digital revolution on libraries & librarians:

 

"In fall 2011, ALA established a Digital Content and Libraries Working Group and an associated initiative. In an Association-wide effort, members and staff from ALA’s divisions, offices, and other bodies are being coordinated to pursue short-term and long-term activities to advance the interests of the library community. These activities will provide support for the library community, as well as communication and advocacy with the general public and other key stakeholders such as publishers, other information intermediaries, and government agencies.

But ALA can only go so far. You must take action to meet your own institutional challenges. Take a hard look at how you are doing business, assess what resources you have, and consider whether you are well positioned for the challenges ahead. (Confronting the Future provides some direction on how to frame this strategy development.) The main driver of change in the past 10 years may have been the digital revolution, but these changes also have serious organizational implications for libraries.

Get involved in grassroots action. You can negotiate directly with publishers and intermediaries, perhaps in collaboration with other librarians or such organizations as library cooperatives and state libraries. Spread the word among your patrons, local government officials, local newspapers, and other media.

What are you doing for your library and your profession?"

 

ALAN S. INOUYE is the program manager of ALA’s new initiative on digital content and libraries. He is also director of the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy, based in Washington, D.C.

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Why Don’t Librarians Collaborate More?

Why Don’t Librarians Collaborate More? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
After reading a lot of literature on libraries in this 21st Century, it finally struck me that one area in which I have read virtually nothing is collaboration among librarians.

Via Dailin Shaido
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Is It Time to Rebuild & Retool Public Libraries and Make “TechShops”?

Is It Time to Rebuild & Retool Public Libraries and Make “TechShops”? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Let’s explore what could be ahead for public libraries and how we could collectively transform them into “factories” — not factories that make things, but factories that help make people who want to learn and make things.

Will libraries go away? Will they become hackerspaces, TechShops, tool-lending libraries, and Fab Labs, or have these new, almost-public spaces displaced a new role for libraries?

 

For many of us, books themselves are tools. In the sense that books are tools of knowledge, the library is a repository for tools, so will we add “real tools” for the 21st century?

 

Before we dive into the future, let’s take a look at the current public library scene now. Feel free to skip this part. I think it’s pretty interesting though."

 

[...]

 

"But why does it matter? Some of you will likely say that hackerspaces and TechShops are filling the void where a public library could have evolved to — that’s probably true. I think public libraries are one of those “use it or lose” it things we have in a society. Given the current state of budgets all over the USA, I think unless they’re seen as the future, we might just lose them.

 

How can we encourage American innovation?How can we get kids access to laser cutters, CAD, 3D printers, and tools to design and build?How can we train each other for the jobs and skills needed in the 21st century?How can we spark the creativity and imagination of kids?How can America be a world leader in design and engineering?"

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Library is no longer just for readers - San Antonio Express

Library is no longer just for readers - San Antonio Express | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"For eight years, the Landa Gardens Conservancy, a nonprofit volunteer organization, has been working to make the library more than just a place to check out books.
With more than $1.5 million it raised, the group has transformed the library in the historic Monte Vista neighborhood into a community center where parents can take their children to play and students from nearby Trinity University can sit under shade trees to read.
In 2008, the organization remade the five acres of land that surround the former private mansion by installing 30 benches, a medieval community garden and more than 7,000 plants.
Also that year, the conservancy commissioned Carlos Cortes, the craftsman responsible for the city's public art made of concrete designed to look like wood — called faux bois — to create the pavilion.
In 2011, new playground equipment was installed. This year, shade trees were added near the playground.
The organization strives to make the library an enjoyable place for anyone in the city, not just those in the neighborhood, said the group's former president, Ann Van Pelt, who now serves as a member of the board of directors."

 

Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/article/Library-is-no-longer-just-for-readers-3640773.php#ixzz1y8JEaSbF

 

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RB 200: The Library Of The Future | Berkman Center - podcast

RB 200: The Library Of The Future | Berkman Center - podcast | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @trisaratop: Berkman Center for Internet & Society talks about the Future of Libraries (audio available): http://t.co/UrdYsybD...

 

"The technological advancements of the past twenty years have rendered the future of the library as a physical space, at least, as uncertain as it has ever been. The information that libraries were once built to house in the form of books and manuscripts can now be accessed in the purely digital realm, as evidenced by initiatives like the Digital Public Library of America, which convenes for the second time this Friday in San Francisco. But libraries still have profound cultural significance, indicating that even if they are no longer necessary for storing books they will continue to exist in some altered form. Radio Berkman host David Weinberger postulated in his book Too Big To Know that the book itself is no longer an appropriate knowledge container – it has been supplanted by the sprawling knowledge networks of the internet. The book’s subtitle is "Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room." Inspired by the work of Harvard Graduate School of Design students in Biblioteca 2: Library Test Kitchen – who spent the semester inventing and building library innovations ranging from nap carrels to curated collections displayed on book trucks to digital welcome mats – we turned the microphone around and had library expert Matthew Battles ask David, "When the smartest person in the room is the room, how do we design the room?" Matthew Battles is the Managing Editor and Curatorial Practice Fellow at the Harvard metaLAB. He wrote Library: an Unquiet History and a biography of Harvard’s Widener Library."

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Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica

Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Curt Hopkins:

"Libraries are changing, despite their facades. And they're changing to high-tech service companies with embedded librarians, according to some library professionals."

 

"This transition time is one of great opportunity for those involved in libraries, but all transitions, all borders and verges, are places of great vulnerability as well. Grand changes are possible here, but so are operatic failures. The future seems promising. It’s the present that worries some librarians.

“The myth that the information scholars need for research and teaching is, or soon will be available for free online is a dangerous one,” said Bourg, “especially when it is used as an excuse to cut funding to libraries. Right now libraries face enormous but exciting challenges in maintaining print collections and services where they are still necessary, while simultaneously developing strategies for collecting, preserving, organizing, and providing access to digital objects. I fear that if libraries across the nation don’t get the resources we collectively need to meet these challenges that we may be at risk of losing big chunks of our cultural record because of a lack of funding for digital collecting and preservation."

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Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries

Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Michel-Adrien:

"At a session this morning at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) in Toronto, New York-based consultant Nigel Holloway outlined some of the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among CALL members."

 

"Some 140 law librarians responded, about one quarter of the CALL membership, with two fifths of respondents coming from law firms, a bit over one third from from courthouse libraries, and about one sixth from universities. More than 50% of respondents worked in small libraries (1-3 staff), more or less 20% in medium-sized libraries (4-9), and about one quarter in libraries with more than 10 staff members."

[...]

"The survey is quite revealing about the trend toward digital content. Right now, some 45% of respondents state that more than 40% of their content is in digital format. 70% of respondents expect this to be the situation by 2014."

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Masters of the digital multiverse: can public libraries save the day? > The Conversation

Masters of the digital multiverse: can public libraries save the day? > The Conversation | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
We all know the internet has enabled the creation of digital worlds of multi-layered, interconnected online information.

"But who’s going to protect this information for current and future generations?

Online publishing is moving away from its embryonic phase – consisting mostly of electronic surrogates of paper or print artefacts – towards a new, fully-fledged networked information paradigm.

Traditional information forms such as encyclopedias and journals are morphing into dynamic, interactive digital objects. Most prominent among these is Wikipedia, the Web 2.0 flagship, which provides a mechanism for open, collaborative and dynamic information authoring and sharing, fostering the co-production of knowledge.

We’ve already seen a proliferation of free information services: Google Books, Google Maps, AustLII, and the ABS Database, to name just a few. Portals such as Health InCite open digital doorways to virtual meta-collections of specialised information."

[...]

"There is a place here for the great public library institutions of the world to work in partnership with commercial providers.

By providing trusted, sustainable archiving of dynamic web knowledge and culture, they can continue to fulfil their vital, ongoing societal role as protectors of our information heritage."

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