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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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The three main types of library

The three main types of library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Indexer:

"Libraries the whole world over are under threat, mainly because the people who fund them are under the mistaken impression that they are no longer needed in the age of the Internet. I used to be a full-time librarian, but I lost my job in 2002 for that very reason. The company that employed me took the view that because it was "all on the Internet" there was no reason why they should employ somebody to do what everybody could do for themselves from their desktop.

 

Not surprisingly, we librarians have a different take on the matter. We believe that libraries and librarians are hugely important and will continue to be so. Indeed, the ironic thing is that the availability of information via the World Wide Web makes us even more important and vital!

 

We want to dispel a few misconceptions and make more converts to the cause, not just because we want to keep our jobs, but because we don't want people to miss out on the benefits that libraries can bring.

 

First of all, what do you understand by the word Library? Do you appreciate just how wide-ranging libraries are? For starters, there are three main types of library, which I shall outline in the rest of this hub."

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Some University students prefer digital assistance to librarian interaction

Some University students prefer digital assistance to librarian interaction | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

For some students, validity of information takes a backseat to ease of access.

"A two-year study of students’ research habits at five Illinois universities found that the majority of college students did most of their research with Google and did not properly use scholarly databases.

Caroline Barratt, director of the Miller Learning Center Library Commons, said with so much information available online, students may overlook the services the libraries provide.

“People may be overconfident about the results they find in a Google search,” Barratt said. “For example, Google can be really useful, but it is often the case that a librarian can find a better source for you that your professor will look on with approval.”

Kyle Boutte, a senior middle school education major from Athens, said she studies at the library but has never asked a librarian for assistance."

 

 

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Libraries on Google+ — The Digital Shift

Libraries on Google+ — The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @perkoch: RT @resourceshelf: Libraries on Google+: From The Digital Shift : http://t.co/OcUcB0ZJ...

 

"Google’s popular social networking site, Google+, was launched in June of this year, and has since built up a membership of more than 40 million users. But only earlier this month did Google begin allowing organizations, and not just individuals, to create their own pages on the site. In the past few weeks, dozens of libraries have created Google+ pages, from large public libraries such as the New York Public Library, to smaller, tech-savvy ones like Darien Library, CT, and Skokie Public Library, IL. Several academic libraries have staked out Google+ pages, as well."

 

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Zimbabwe Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students | EIFL

Zimbabwe Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students | EIFL | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

#Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students: University of Zimbabwe #AFRICA via @EIFLnet http://t.co/JzrsEN23...

 

"The librarians at the University of Zimbabwe (UZ) wanted to better serve the students with visual impairments at their university. In collaboration with the EIFL-FOSS programme, they formed a partnership with UZ’s Disability Resource Centre (DRC) to implement real solutions resulting in increased access to online resources for the UZ’s students with disabilities. Their success was recognized by the Zimbabwe Ministry of Public Affairs, and the project has been nominated for a UN award."

 

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Emily Heuring's curator insight, April 26, 2014 9:54 PM

Zimbabwe is improving it's educational resources for the visually impared. They are installing magnifying programs as well as programs that read text aloud into library computers and individual's laptops in order to allow those with poor eyesight access to online resources. They have also been extending these programs beyond libraries in order to reach more people. This will help their economy in the long  run by giving more people access to information and an education. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 24, 2014 9:49 AM

Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students | EIFL

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The Myth of the Bookless Library | Inside Higher Ed

The Myth of the Bookless Library | Inside Higher Ed | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @IHEtech: Are "bookless #libraries" a myth?

 

"... academic libraries buy fewer and fewer books because the rent keeps going up. This rent, of course, is not for space – though that’s expensive, too. I’m talking about all that electronic stuff, the stuff that the would-be book burners and banners assume is free. When you know that a subscription you’ve been spending tens of thousands of dollars on will vanish if you fail to pay the rent, you trim where you can, and for the past thirty years, that’s been the book budget, which is more discretionary than those demanding subscriptions. No wonder university presses and other scholarly book publishers are banding together to license digital book collections by subscription. It seems the only way to guarantee your product will get into libraries is to charge a lot for something that disappears if you stop paying.

 

No matter how innovative the bookless library sounds, this isn't a situation we planned. If the academic library of the future is bookless, it won’t be because of vision. It will be because of the lack of it."

 

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/library-babel-fish/myth-bookless-library#ixzz1dwTmh8VA
Inside Higher Ed

 

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100 Extensive University Libraries from Around the World that Anyone Can Access

100 Extensive University Libraries from Around the World that Anyone Can Access | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Universities house an enormous amount of information and their libraries are often the center of it all. You don't have to be affiliated with any university to take advantage of some of what they h...

 

"From digital archives, to religious studies, to national libraries, these university libraries from around the world have plenty of information for you. There are many resources for designers as well. Although this is mainly a blog that caters to designers and artists I have decided to include many other libraries for all to enjoy.

 

- Digital libraries

- International Digital libraries

- Books & texts

- Medical libraries

- Legal libraries

- National Libraries of Europe

- World Religion libraries

- Specialized Collections

- Academic Research

- American Universities

- International Universities

 

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Helen Lynch's curator insight, September 22, 2013 4:50 AM

Very useful list...

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ALA | AASL Top 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning

ALA | AASL Top 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
AASL Top 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning (What a treasure trove!

 

"The "Top 25" Websites foster the qualities of innovation, creativity, active participation, and collaboration. They are free, Web-based sites that are user friendly and encourage a community of learners to explore and discover."

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Danielle Kemp's curator insight, November 19, 2014 8:08 PM

This website features some really great and useful resources for teachers. Every teacher is always looking for a new great and fun idea.

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Tools, not Trends | Academic Librarian

Tools, not Trends: http://t.co/olDHo4e3...

 

"...Tools and tech­nolo­gies you absolutely need to use, and what you can ignore for the time being.

In aca­d­e­mic libraries, it means know­ing the tools that stu­dents really want and use ver­sus the tools that trend­watch­ing librar­i­ans claim they should be want­ing and using. You can see some of of those tools in the Edu­cause Cen­ter for Applied Research National Study of Under­grad­u­ate Stu­dents and Infor­ma­tion Tech­nol­ogy 2011.

It’s worth skim­ming to get an idea of what tech­nol­ogy stu­dents use and how they use it.

Those who believe that stu­dents avidly adopt every infor­ma­tion tech­nol­ogy and social media trend–and who tell us this is essen­tial for librar­i­ans to do as well–might get a few surprises."

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Emerald | New Library World | The academic librarian and the academe

Emerald | New Library World | The academic librarian and the academe | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the increased lack of clarity about the professional role of academic librarians, and where the future lies in the academic environment during this period of fast information environment change.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes the form of a literature review and commentary on developments in the area of academic librarianship in a new information environment.

Findings – The profession is finding ways to become equipped and incorporate new technologies into the existing framework of high-quality information service delivery. As the demands and wishes of end users transform, librarians have sought to re-define what the library building and services mean to those who use the library. Because the nature of the content librarians work with is dramatically re-structuring, so the profession is experimenting with new ideas for its capture, organization and delivery.

Practical implications – It is important for academic librarians to work towards the transformation of their relationship with faculty to emphasize an ability to assist them with integrating information technology and library resources into courses. This is based on collaboration and networking.

Originality/value – The paper reveals that change is happening in a new, increasingly competitive information environment in which the academic library is no longer necessarily the conventional resource of first choice for the academe it exists to serve.

 

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Making digital materials more visible in an academic library - www.InfoToday.eu

Making digital materials more visible in an academic library - www.InfoToday.eu | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
What can be done to increase the visibility of digital materials in a physical library?
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“Getting the Most out of Academic Libraries and Librarians

“Getting the Most out of Academic Libraries and Librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

“Getting the Most out of Academic Libraries – and Librarians”. Posted on December 10, 2011 by UT Librarians."

"Article on current levels of student proficiency at being able to assess, critically, electronic resources – nothing new, but reaffirms current views."

 

Carol Saller:

"The group [academic librarians] unanimously perceived a lack of skills among its clientele: Students are routinely flummoxed as to how to search for or evaluate the sources they need in their work. But even as librarians are poised to teach information technology through classes, online tutorials, and one-on-one sessions, actually laying hold of student time and attention depends on faculty support—and that is not always easy to find.

 

The extent to which college students are unprepared to conduct research may be surprising to those who assume that young adults are automatically proficient at any computer-related task. “Many students don’t actually know how to interpret the citations that they find in print or online, and as a result, they don’t understand what to search for,” says Georgiana McReynolds, management and social-sciences librarian at MIT. “They search for book chapters in Google because they don’t recognize a book citation compared to an article citation. Or they don’t know which is the title of the article as opposed to the title of the journal. Or they can’t decipher all the numbers that define the volume, issue, and date.”

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In Praise of Librarians and Archivists (by Mark Cheathem)

In Praise of Librarians and Archivists (by Mark Cheathem) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

In Praise of Librarians and Archivists: Appreciating the Colleagues Who Make Professors' Jobs Easier By Mark Cheathem, Associate Professor of History, Cumberland University

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Linked data and libraries: a blossoming romance? : Digital ...

The W3C library linked data incubator group released their report. This report recommends that librarians experiment more with linked data by releasing data, building on top of linked data sets, engaging with standards ...

 

Over the last couple of weeks 3 very interesting reports have drifted through my news feeds on libraries and linked data:

 

The library of congress has announced plans for pursuing a replacement for MARC and these plans “will be focused on the Web environment, Linked Data principles and mechanisms, and the Resource Description Framework (RDF) as a basic data model”.

 

The W3C library linked data incubator group released their report. This report recommends that librarians experiment more with linked data by releasing data, building on top of linked data sets, engaging with standards bodies and bring their preservation skills to bear on datasets and vocabularies.

 

A CLIR report has been published on a linked data workshop and survey run by Stanford. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the “the prospects for a large scale, multi-national, multi-institutional prototype of a Linked Data environment for discovery of and navigation among the rapidly, chaotically expanding array of academic information resources.” The report itself is useful for everyone as it contains sections on the value of a linked data approach for library content and talks about potential killer apps linked data could support.

 


Via Bhojaraju Gunjal
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Karen du Toit's comment, November 21, 2011 3:46 AM
Thankas for this!
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Evolving Hurdles: Collection Development at libraries

Evolving Hurdles: Collection Development at libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"I was talking with a friend the other day about how the problems of one library often are not the problems of another."

 

"Libraries have classically claimed a variety of challenges to collection development and development planning, depending on the institution’s size and type. Outsourced development firms can homogenize a collection. Where development staff are unfamiliar with the demographics of a local usership, a library may incur a wealth of items doomed to be sight unseen, while omitting from its collection materials that are truly valuable to its patrons.

Academic research libraries, while attempting to address the information explosion and provide access to increasing research publications, face escalating material costs and associated headaches. Add now fluctuations in the publisher-library relationship, inherent contractual issues regarding downloads, and debate over whether student interest justifies huge expenditures tied to digital collections.

It’s at once interesting, concerning, and necessary to look at the varied barriers to collection development and to evaluate how these obstacles have evolved."

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Academic Libraries on Facebook: An Analysis of Users' Comments

Academic Libraries on Facebook: An Analysis of Users' Comments | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Paper by Michalis Gerolimos:

 

D-Lib Magazine (RT @aarontay: 2011 data on FB pages in academic libraries http://t.co/M7Nk8B1k author is quite down on it.)...

 

At a detailed level, this paper explores the possibilities and challenges that Facebook presents to academic libraries that choose to set up a page — especially when they use the wall — not only as an announcement service but also as a forum where students can communicate with the library and exchange ideas with its personnel and among themselves. This paper focuses on documenting user feedbacks posted on the library wall and on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of their content.

 

Additionally, this study provides several metrics regarding user comments on the wall such as the number of comments per library, if the comments are related to the library or not, the percentage of library posts that had no comments or "likes", the ratio of comments vs. "likes", and the feedback and comments per post and per library. It aims to help the reader understand how library users interact with a library in this particular online environment, and what the problems and the potential benefits are for academic libraries that choose to use Facebook."

 

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