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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Libraries and Social media | DianeVautier.com

Libraries and Social media | DianeVautier.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by DIANE VAUTIER:

"U.S. libraries of all types continue to make increasing use of social media and Web 2.0 applications and tools to connect with library users and to market programs and services according to the American Library Association.

 

"But change still continues to be a major factor when it comes to adding social media and web 2.0 to the library mix. Shift happens and will continue to drive change, specifically when it comes to content creation and content curation.

Librarians would do well to follow the same steps as does small business when it comes to content creation using social media:

Find your audience

Set your goals

Start with the basics and optimize those accounts Build a team

Create a Content Map

Link accounts – Connect, connect ,connect – your social network.

 

Content curation is where libraries and librarians have a natural advantage because it’s already what they do everyday. Librarians have content curation super powers.  Now that content curation has moved from an in-person resource to an online resource however, librarians are in a unique position to help patrons manage the online information overload, and they can use social media tools to do it. Social media can help libraries become more highly visible and useful to the communities they serve.

If you’d like additional information on this presentation, you can find the slide deck on SlideShare and the full video on Vimeo."

http://www.slideshare.net/dvautier/libraries-and-social-media

 

http://vimeo.com/42157533

 

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Digital Citizenship Poster > Is this okay to share on social media?

Digital Citizenship Poster > Is this okay to share on social media? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Go way beyond Internet safety. Turn students into great digital citizens.


Get all the tools you need with our FREE Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum and Parent Media Education Program. The relevant, ready-to-use instruction helps you guide students to make safe, smart, and ethical decisions in the digital world where they live, study and play.

 

Every day, your students are tested with each post, search, chat, text message, file download, and profile update. Will they connect with like minds or spill TMI to the wrong people?

 

Will they behave creatively or borrow ideas recklessly? Will they do the right thing or take shortcuts?"

 

Read more...

 


Via Gust MEES, Ann Vega, Dr. Laura Sheneman, Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Oregon's wired libraries are a digital delight

Oregon's wired libraries are a digital delight | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
If you still think of libraries as a place only for books of the paper kind, think again. Libraries nationwide -- including those in the metro area and beyond -- are going digital with downloadable resources, from e-books to online language programs.

 

"Since Multnomah County began offering downloadable books and videos in 2010, use of the service has skyrocketed, said Jeremy Graybill, a spokesman for the county library system. Ten months into the fiscal year, checkouts have already more than doubled last year's numbers, with more than 189,000 checkouts of electronic titles. Similar trends are seen in Clackamas and Washington counties.

To meet the increasing demand, libraries throughout the metro area are increasing their collections of downloadable books, audio and video. But navigating the ever-expanding options can be overwhelming. Library visitors so regularly request help with their e-readers, tablet computers and smartphones that Flotten has launched a weekly hourlong session to answer their questions."

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'Chuck' churns through library checkouts in Louisville - Daily Camera

'Chuck' churns through library checkouts in Louisville - Daily Camera | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
'Chuck' churns through library checkouts in Louisville Daily Camera By John Aguilar Camera Staff Writer Izzy Thomason, 11, left, and Jil Thomason watch the new book-sorting machine at the Louisville Public Library on May 11, 2012.

"Chuck, known to his manufacturers as the 3M Intelligent Return and Sorter System FX, made its debut at the Louisville Public Library earlier this week and the $146,000 high-tech sorting machine is already wowing staff with its work ethic and indefatigable spirit. Chuck, so named by library staff because of its ability to "chuck" books into the right bins, can handle 1,200 items per hour -- ten times more than can be sorted by hand."
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Reminder: Archiving Human Rights for Advocacy ... - Archivists Watch

Reminder: Archiving Human Rights for Advocacy ... - Archivists Watch | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Join WITNESS and the New Tactics community for an online dialogue on Archiving Human Rights for Advocacy, Justice and Memory from May 16 to 22, 2012. Archiving and preservation have long taken a backseat to more urgent aspects of human rights documentation and advocacy, but that is beginning to change. Human rights archives are increasingly playing a pivotal role in advocacy, restorative justice, historical memory, and struggles against impunity. At the same time, however, archivists and activists alike are grappling with the mounting challenges posed by the proliferation of digital documentation. How can we ensure that the critical documentation created today will be preserved and accessible in the future?

In this dialogue, we will explore the tactics and methods used by archivists to preserve human rights information."

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Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries

Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Michel-Adrien:

"At a session this morning at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) in Toronto, New York-based consultant Nigel Holloway outlined some of the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among CALL members."

 

"Some 140 law librarians responded, about one quarter of the CALL membership, with two fifths of respondents coming from law firms, a bit over one third from from courthouse libraries, and about one sixth from universities. More than 50% of respondents worked in small libraries (1-3 staff), more or less 20% in medium-sized libraries (4-9), and about one quarter in libraries with more than 10 staff members."

[...]

"The survey is quite revealing about the trend toward digital content. Right now, some 45% of respondents state that more than 40% of their content is in digital format. 70% of respondents expect this to be the situation by 2014."

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LIS Trends: Librarians Without Borders (LWB) hosts its first unconference

LIS Trends: Librarians Without Borders (LWB) hosts its first unconference | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
We are an organization that was formed in February 2005 by a group of socially-minded librarians who wanted to address the vast information resource inequity existing between different regions of the world.
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SABC Media Libraries: Springbok Radio handover to SABC

SABC Media Libraries: Springbok Radio handover to SABC | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Photo by Peter Jaquire.

 

The Springbok Radio Preservation Society handed back their collection of archive material of Springbok Radio which was on the airwaves from 1950 - 1985 in South Africa.

During those days there was no archive, and the material would have been lost, if it had not been for efforts by people to preserve and collect that material.

Frans Erasmus has been instrumental in the Springbok Radio Preservation Society, and streamed a weekly update of material on the Internet.

The material is back in the SABC Radio Archives at the South African Broadcasting Corporation.

 

Links:

Media release: http://sabcmedialib.blogspot.com/2012/05/hand-over-of-springbok-radio-archive.html

 

About Frans Erasmus: http://sabcmedialib.blogspot.com/2012/05/hand-over-of-springbok-radio-archive.html

 

 

Picasa Slideshow of the handover function: http://sabcmedialib.blogspot.com/2012/05/picasa-slideshow-of-springbok-radio.html

 

 

Springbok Radio website: http://www.sabc.co.za/springbokRadio/index.html

 

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11 Fabulous Libraries in South America - Mental Floss

11 Fabulous Libraries in South America - Mental Floss | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Jill Harness:

"11 Fabulous Libraries in South America

Last week we toured some of Europe's most beautiful libraries. Now let's see what South America has to offer."

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Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out - Smithsonian (blog), by @Film_Legacy

Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out - Smithsonian (blog), by @Film_Legacy | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Smithsonian (blog): Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out

[...] 

"Skip Elsheimer, a media archeologist with A/V Geeks, believes that access to materials is key. “Access is the first step toward preservation,” he said. “When films are online, people can access them and identify areas for research. You can say, ‘You know what? That title’s important because it was made by a special company, or it’s the first time a musician scored something, or it’s an early appearance by an actor.’”

Digital answers some of these access issues, but also raises other questions. “Videotape is going away,” Elsheimer pointed out. “The crushing blow was the tsunamis in Japan last year that hit the Sony tape manufacturing plants. A lot of people changed over to file-based formats at that point.”

But what format do you use? “When YouTube came out, it was a pretty big deal,” Elsheimer said. “We’re still talking to archives who want a YouTube channel, so that’s what the bar is. And that bar’s not very high. But a lot of people just want to see something, even if they’re seeing it in the worst possible quality.”

Elsheimer believes how we watch movies determines the delivery format. “With High Definition, video has gotten bigger, but people are watching it smaller—on iPhones and iPads,” he said. “What’s changing now is the software for reading video files. Final Cut was a big thing for a while, but we’re shifting to another format. Are QuickTime files going to be valuable anymore? Probably not.”

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Consumers Choosing Tablets Over E-Readers, E-Book Sales to Suffer | Digital Book World

Consumers Choosing Tablets Over E-Readers, E-Book Sales to Suffer | Digital Book World | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Jeremy Greenfield:

"As consumers increasingly choose tablet computers over e-readers for e-book reading, the e-book business will be adversely affected, according to a new survey."

 

[...]"Kelly Gallagher, vice president of publishing services at Bowker Market Research, which partnered with BISG on the survey.

“Tablets will adversely affect the e-book business in that the tablet is a multifunction device and will therefore draw the reader into non-book activities and therefore cause them to consume books slower and therefore buy fewer books versus a single function e-reading device,” said Gallagher.

The survey, conducted among 1,000 e-book buyers in February 2012, has good news for publishers, too. Nearly two thirds of respondents said they spent more money on e-books once they bought an e-reading device of any kind and nearly three quarters said they bought more e-book titles.

In the short term, at least, e-book buying continues to rise despite the growing popularity of tablets."


Via nickcarman
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Library Technology Is a Good Investment « Library Journal

Library Technology Is a Good Investment « Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Meredith Schwartz:

"Two surveys conducted by Inside Higher Ed found that college and university chief academic officers/provosts and presidents consider library technology to be their most effective technological investment."

 

"The 2011-12 Inside Higher Ed Survey of College and University Chief Academic Officers found that, on average, CAOs/provosts rated their institutions’ investment in library technology as 58.8 percent effective, a higher percentage than they gave to any other technology investment. Within that overall score, for-profit institutions were the most satisfied, with a ranking of 77.4 percent, followed by private doctoral programs at 64.9 percent. Private associates programs were the most dissatisfied at 42.9 percent, followed by private baccalaureate programs at 50 percent.
In Presidential Perspectives on the Effectiveness of Campus Investments in Information Technology, presidents were harder on library tech than provosts, rating its effectiveness at 51 percent. But that lower number still made library resources and services the only category that a majority of all presidents rated as very effective. Library resources was the top category chosen overall as well specifically by private and for-profit institutions. Interestingly, public colleges and universities ranked library tech third, behind online distance education and on campus instructional technologies, even though they scored it higher numerically – at 53.1 percent compared to only 46.9 percent for private institutions. Public baccalaureate programs were the most satisfied with their library technology effectiveness at 60.8 percent; public masters programs were least satisfied at 45.2 percent." http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/03/academic-libraries/libraries-are-colleges-most-effective-tech-investment-surveys-find/

 


Via Elvira Embser-Herbert, Robin Illsley
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Florida libraries adopt QR codes to offer free music and books - QR Code Press

Florida libraries adopt QR codes to offer free music and books - QR Code Press | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Broward County Library FL using QR codes to promote  and access OverDrive and Freegal Music

-- spotted by @johnfoleyjr 

 

 Written by John Montgallo

"QR codes may help drive traffic to local libraries:

County officials believe that this initiative will be successful and help consumers grow more attached to local libraries. The services will be available at all hours of the day, even when libraries are closed. Those using the OverDrive application will be able to download books and music while at home instead of having to make a trip to local libraries. These consumers will still have the opportunity to find and scan QR codes as a way to gain access to digital content.

Broward County is not alone in its adoption of QR codes. Palm Beach County has also begun offering downloadable e-books via QR codes. The county does not have any intention of joining the Freegal Music Service at this time, however."


Via Doug Mirams
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Google This, by Terry Ballard < One year of my life | Librarian on the edge - for your library #books

Google This, by Terry Ballard < One year of my life | Librarian on the edge - for your library #books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Terry Ballard:

"Last April I got a contract with Chandos Publishing of Oxfordshire to write a book called "Google this: Putting Google and other social media sites to work for your library." 

http://www.terryballard.org/googlethis.html ;

"As I had envisioned originally, I found dozens of librarians who had done great things with social media and got their stories. Whenever possible, I added cookbook-like instructions for crating things like IGoogle gadgets or captioning videos in YouTube. Being a longtime quote collector, I was able to find an apt quote for every chapter beginning. In the end, I see this as the capstone of a career that has gone on for nearly 50 years."

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A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library

A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Catherine:  

"Special libraries are found within many different types of organizations, such as broadcast networks. Many have internal libraries and librarians which provide archival, research, information retrieval and reference services. These library collections are often closed to the public, focused on serving the needs of direct staff and affiliates. Librarianship within media organizations is a fascinating part of special libraries. In an article from American Journalism Review, in 1995, the 'news librarian' was described as, "the collectors, managers, and re-distributors of the organization's primary product, information. This is critical in all stages of information's flow through the organization – initial information gathering for use in news reporting, in the collection of the news product into databases, in the repackaging of information created by the organization into new products." Much has changed in the industry in the last fifteen years, however the role of collector and manager of the organization's content is still a vital one.

NPR is a non-profit privately and publicly funded membership media organization. The content produced by NPR is nationally syndicated to over 900 public radio stations in the United States. The NPR library does not have a publicly accessible website, as their collections are not available for circulation and reference outside of NPR affiliated patrons. The collection consists of archival audio of NPR produced shows, collections of commercial music and spoken word (films, tv shows, speeches, poetry). Library staff do have a twitter account that is well worth following. The tweets often highlight stories on the NPR website such as this one about the The Most Gigantal, Behemothian Thesaurus In The World"

 

- Includes links to all related websites of NPR.

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Musings about librarianship: How is Google different from traditional Library OPACs & databases?

Musings about librarianship: How is Google different from traditional Library OPACs & databases? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Aaron Tay: "It's a truism in library circles today to say that Google and web search engines (I will use "Google" as a stand in for web search engines) have changed the way users search which in turn affects what they expect from searches in the library."

 

"This article discuss the differences in default searches,  starting from features that are totally accepted": http://musingsaboutlibrarianship.blogspot.com/2012/05/how-is-google-different-from.html


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
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Preserving songs from fragile records for posterity with IRENE #archives #audio

Preserving songs from fragile records for posterity with IRENE #archives #audio | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

ASHA SRIDHAR:

"As an ageing record spins untouched by the spokes of a gramophone at the Roja Muthiah Research Library, M.K. Thyagaraja Bhagavathar's timeless song Un Azhagai Kaana from the movie Thiruneelakantar is converted into 2-d black and white images by a device called IRENE, preserving it for posterity.

Other than the Library of Congress in the United States, Roja Muthiah Research Library is the only institution that has IRENE (Image Reconstruct Erase Noise Etc), an ingenious device that helps in archiving audio content of old records without scratching or even touching the record, says G. Sundar, director of the library.

IRENE, which reached the library two weeks ago, has just been set up, and will help the library archive audio content from records which are too fragile to be played with a conventional player or are deteriorating. “A high-end camera captures images of the grooves as the record is rotating. The software acts as a virtual needle by detecting the edges of the grooves. These images are then converted into sound files,” he says."

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Librarians Remain Concerned About Privacy Rights - Library Journal

Librarians Remain Concerned About Privacy Rights - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

LJ: "Librarians Remain Concerned About Privacy Rights - Library Journal

As the Cyber Information Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) awaits debate in the Senate, an overwhelming majority of librarians remain concerned about privacy rights and individuals' desire to protect and control access to their personal information, according to the preliminary findings of a study released by the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom. More than 95 percent of librarians who responded to the survey said that “government agencies and businesses shouldn’t share personal information with third parties without authorization and should only be used for a specific purpose,” according to a recent press announcement from ALA."

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