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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Assessing Innovation in Corporate and Government Libraries

Assessing Innovation in Corporate and Government Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Deane Zeeman, Rebecca Jones, and Jane Dysart:

"This study identifies innovative service trends in library and information services in the government and corporate arenas."

 

"e Context
This study reports on the results of interviews conducted in December 2009 and January 2010 to identify innovative service trends in library and information services in the government and corporate arenas. The study was undertaken as part of a Library and Archives Canada (LAC) research project to inform the Government of Canada Assistant Deputy Ministers Task Force (ADM Task Force) on the Future of Federal Library Service in gaining a better understanding of future-oriented service delivery models adopted by corporate and government libraries."

 

"The interview structure matched the “building blocks” for service models defined by the ADM Task Force—E-Library, E-Services, Digitization, Physical Space, Technology, and Procurement—and probed the specific services that the interviewees offer in each .” This structure was also used to frame the findings."

 

From journal "Computers in Libraries"

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2011 Global Student E-book Survey

2011 Global Student E-book Survey - by Allen McKiel. Usage up 8 - 16%.
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iPads Improve Kindergarteners' Literacy Scores - WebProNews

iPads Improve Kindergarteners' Literacy Scores - WebProNews | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Joh Wolford:

"iPads Improve Kindergarteners' Literacy Scores WebProNews From Hack Education: But as Damian Bebell, one of the project's researchers argues, we can't just act as though the devices “arrive on parachutes” into a classroom and suddenly and magically..."


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Best Databases 2011: Librarians Decide Which Databases Make the Grade — Library Journal Reviews

Best Databases 2011: Librarians Decide Which Databases Make the Grade — Library Journal Reviews | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Best Databases 2011: Librarians Decide Which Databases Make the Grade-Library Journal http://t.co/E6QEKA7j...

"To learn which resources have emerged as the most remarkable tools in a sea of digital research options, we polled a group of librarians and LJ reviewers to choose the “best” of 2011 (see our list of contributors on page 18).

Many of them were involved in the original E-Reference Ratings. Here are their picks.

BEST OVERALL

Credo Reference
Credo www.credoreference.com

 

For the rest, see here: http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/2011/12/reference/best-databases-2011-librarians-decide-which-databases-make-the-grade/

 

 

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For Reading and Learning, Kids Prefer E-Books to Print Books | Digital Book World | School Librarian In Action @ Scoop It!

For Reading and Learning, Kids Prefer E-Books to Print Books | Digital Book World | School Librarian In Action @ Scoop It! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A new study suggests that children prefer e-books to print books and that they retain and comprehend an equal amount of information from both print- and e-books."

 

"A new “QuickStudy” – so named for its short duration and the small size of its sample group – from the Joan Ganz Cooney Center observed 24 families with children ranging in age from three-to-six reading both print and e-books in the Summer and Fall of 2011. Most of the children in the study preferred reading an e-book to a print book and comprehension between the two formats were the same.

“If we can encourage kids to engage in books through an iPad, that’s a win already,” said Carly Shuler, senior consultant for industry studies at the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop is a New York based non-profit organization dedicated to understanding how children learn through digital media."

Read more at DigitalBookWorld.com: For Reading and Learning, Kids Prefer E-Books to Print Books | Digital Book World http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2012/for-reading-and-learning-kids-prefer-e-books-to-print-books/#ixzz1j8QPvsIc

 

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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Extremely valuable skills for Infrmation Professionals of the future:

 

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf 

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf  


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Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 7:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 7:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 4, 2014 2:34 AM

Curating Information and Data Sense-Making Is The Key Skill for the Future [Research]

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School Libraries Count! 2011 Supplemental Report | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

School Libraries Count! 2011 Supplemental Report | American Association of School Librarians (AASL) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

School Libraries Count!2011 supplementary report on digital citizenship http://t.co/qGuzTTWr...

AASL's National Longitudinal Survey of School Library Programs

Supplemental Report on Digital Citizenship

 

 

Key Highlights:

Traditional School Library Curriculum Carried Over Into Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship Curriculum

Digital Citizen Content

Access as Barrier to Teaching Digital Citizenship

 

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Academic Libraries on Facebook: An Analysis of Users' Comments

Academic Libraries on Facebook: An Analysis of Users' Comments | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Paper by Michalis Gerolimos:

 

D-Lib Magazine (RT @aarontay: 2011 data on FB pages in academic libraries http://t.co/M7Nk8B1k author is quite down on it.)...

 

At a detailed level, this paper explores the possibilities and challenges that Facebook presents to academic libraries that choose to set up a page — especially when they use the wall — not only as an announcement service but also as a forum where students can communicate with the library and exchange ideas with its personnel and among themselves. This paper focuses on documenting user feedbacks posted on the library wall and on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of their content.

 

Additionally, this study provides several metrics regarding user comments on the wall such as the number of comments per library, if the comments are related to the library or not, the percentage of library posts that had no comments or "likes", the ratio of comments vs. "likes", and the feedback and comments per post and per library. It aims to help the reader understand how library users interact with a library in this particular online environment, and what the problems and the potential benefits are for academic libraries that choose to use Facebook."

 

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SMU Library Blog: Would you like to brush up on your Internet research skills? > Internet Detective

"Internet Detective will help you find good information online, offer tips on evaluating that information and give advice on referencing and avoiding plagiarism.

 

You can access the tutorial here: http://www.vtstutorials.ac.uk/detective/"

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Library Journal Releases Patron Profiles Detailing Who Uses Libraries and Why

"They are also active books buyers who make many of their purchasing decisions based on the authors or books they first discover in the library.

In fact, over 50 percent of all library users go on to purchase books by an author they were introduced to in the library. This finding is just one of the many key insights to emerge from “Library Patrons and Ebook Usage,” the first issue of Library Journal’s Patron Profiles: Understanding the behavior and preferences of U.S. public library users.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/459725#ixzz1c3eLTsHoNew York, NY (PRWEB) October 19, 2011 You will never think of library users the same way again. Case in point: regular public library users don’t just borrow books."

 

 

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