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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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The Future of Libraries : Beyond Search, by Cynthia Murrell

Cynthia Murrell:

"News and Information from ArnoldIT.com about Search and Content Processing" (New blog post: The Future of Libraries http://t.co/T41wMdxQ...)...

 

"The Republic perceives the inevitable winds and encourages us to adjust our sails in “The Bookless Library.” No matter how much some of us would like to believe otherwise, the traditional library with its stacks upon stacks of wood pulp tomes is on its way out. In a lengthy article that is worth a read, journalist David A. Bell suggests we proactively manage the shift in a way that will best benefit society.
This paragraph was particularly poignant to me:
“Specialized scholars will always have reasons to consult the original paper copies of books. Marginalia, watermarks, paper quality, binding, and many other features of the physical book that digitization cannot always capture offer valuable clues about how the books were produced, circulated, and read, how they created meaning. But this sort of research . . . involves a small number of readers. Far more readers, of course, appreciate physical books for their aesthetic qualities: the feel of the paper, the crisp look of print on the page, the elegant binding, the pleasant heft of the volume in the hand, the sense of history embedded in a venerable edition that has gone through many owners. But this sort of pleasure, real and meaningful as it is, is harder to justify financially, as resources grow increasingly scarce.”

 

Read the article by David A. Bell here: http://www.tnr.com/article/books-and-arts/magazine/david-bell-future-bookless-library

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Digital Preservation 2012: The Power of Community « The Signal: Digital Preservation

Digital Preservation 2012: The Power of Community « The Signal: Digital Preservation | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Digital Preservation 2012 conference (July 24-26 at the Sheraton Pentagon City in Arlington)

by Butch Lazorchak:

"While Web 3.0 technologies will undoubtedly make our lives much easier, they’ll never replace the power of real community achieved when people get together in person to discuss issues, share ideas and work together on solving shared problems."

 

"Follow the action at #digpres12 on Twitter, but attend in person if you can. There’s nothing like the power of face-to-face community."


Via Jessica Parland
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Top three things when hiring a librarian

Top three things when hiring a librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
This anonymous interview is with an Academic Librarian who has been a member of a hiring committee and Supervisor at a library with 10-50 staff members.

 

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

- Have they done what we’re asking for, or at least have experience in the same area?

- Can they communicate clearly?

- Do they know their stuff or are willing to learn their stuff?"

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Brooklyn Public Library Incorporates Self-Checkout - NY1

Brooklyn Public Library Incorporates Self-Checkout - NY1 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
NY1Brooklyn Public Library Incorporates Self-Checkout NY1

"How to keep libraries relevant in a digital age is the challenge of library systems everywhere. The Brooklyn Public Library is making changes to try and keep up."

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Libraries Are Powerful Partners

Libraries Are Powerful Partners | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Bobbi Newman: > follow-up from Annual ALA conference in Anaheim.

"Libraries are Powerful Partners. Now start acting like it.

Powerful partners:

contribute
share
bring something to the table
show up at the party even when they aren’t the belle of the ball
realize that there are many stakeholders
offer support for initiatives and ideas they didn’t think of
are not defensive or hostile
are team players even when they can’t be leaders
contribute to the success of others
don’t insist on doing things “my way” "


Via Trudy Raymakers
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Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012

Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
An innovative course yields new products, services, and experiences that model the possible future of libraries.

 

by Jonathan Shaw:

“WHAT IF YOU THOUGHT seriously about the library as a laboratory, as a place where people do things, where they make things?” asks Jeffrey Schnapp, addressing his “Library Test Kitchen” class. Libraries as centers of knowledge and learning have a rich history—but an uncharted future. The digital revolution, besides changing the nature of books, is transforming the role of libraries in preserving and disseminating information. “What if the Library of Congress were to become a digital library?” continues Schnapp. “What, then, is the role of the physical public library? This is a source of enormous anxiety at the local level because public libraries” face increasing political pressure, including budget cuts, but “play absolutely fundamental civic roles, often as the only public space that remains in smaller communities.”

[...]

"By semester’s end, the brainstorming sessions had generated dozens of good ideas, and a few had become student projects: Biblio, a conceptualization of a hand-held device for scanning books that tracks and shares research and even makes bibliographic recommendations for further study (see the online video); Timeslice, a “graphical electronic bulletin board” that lets library users post event announcements to a community calendar that incorporates digital graphics; Neo-Carrel, a study chair with a raised platform in front that doubles as a laptop stand and a comfortable place to rest one’s head for a nap (now installed in Lamont library); and a WiFi cold spot, a radically designed room for reflection or refuge from an increasingly connected world.

“We think this is an opportunity to be real catalysts for thoughtful change that can’t easily come from other quarters,” explains Schnapp. “Because we’re not librarians, but instead a community of artists, scholars, engineers—people interested in knowledge—we come at the questions a little bit differently. So we think we can be innovative and breathe some fresh air into a conversation that often is about how many jobs are going to be cut, or what will happen to all the space that is freed up once the stacks move out to the Harvard Depository. That’s a conversation that may have to happen, but it would be a tragedy if that were the only framework in which we thought about the possibilities for enhancing the mission of libraries.”


Via Patrick Provencher
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Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video

Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Ant Miller (BBC Research and Development Blog):

"In this second part of the Archive Research film we take a look at the key challenges addressed by the 'preservation' work of R&D and the BBC Information & Archives teams.  With interviews from Dr Richard Wright, Adrian Williams of I&A and others, Alex Mansfield gets to the bottom of the latest technologies being used to ensure that the critical challenge of obsolescence is handled, and handled effectively and efficiency.

With huge files, and critical quality checks essential to preserving the legacy of the archive, the best efforts of engineers and archivists are being applied to saving this content for the future."

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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"People who think libraries are going away simply because books are going digital are missing the true tectonic shifts taking place in the world of information.


Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books."

 

"Libraries have always had a mandate to archive the records of their service area, but it has rarely been pursued with more than passing enthusiasm. Archives of city council meetings and local history books made the cut, but few considered the library to be a good photo or video archive.
Over time, many of the newspapers, radio, and television stations will begin to disappear. As these businesses lose their viability, their storerooms of historical broadcast tapes and documents will need to be preserved. More specifically, every radio broadcast, newspaper, and television broadcast will need to be digitized and archived.
With the advent of iCloud and other similar services libraries will want to expand their hosting of original collections, and installing the equipment to digitize the information. The sale of this information to the outside world through an iTunes-like service could become a valuable income stream for libraries in the future.
Final Thoughts
Libraries, much like any living breathing organism, will have to adapt to the complex nature of the ever-changing world of information. As information becomes more sophisticated and complex, so will libraries.
Libraries are here to stay because they have a survival instinct. They have created a mutually dependent relationship with the communities they serve, and most importantly, they know how to adapt to the changing world around them.
I am always impressed with the creative things being done in libraries. As Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” There are a lot of beautiful dreams taking place that will help form tomorrow’s libraries."
By Futurist Thomas Frey


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World Digital Library

World Digital Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The World Digital Library (WDL) makes available on the Internet, free of charge and in multilingual format, significant primary materials from countries and cultures around the world. These cultural treasures include, but are not limited to, manuscripts, maps, rare books, musical scores, recordings, films, prints, photographs, and architectural drawings. Items on the WDL may easily be browsed by place, time, topic, type of item, and contributing institution, or can be located by an open-ended search, in several languages. Special features include interactive geographic clusters, a timeline, advanced image-viewing and interpretive capabilities. Item-level descriptions and interviews with curators about featured items provide additional information.

 

The principal objectives of the WDL are to:

•Promote international and intercultural understanding;

•Expand the volume and variety of cultural content on the
Internet;

•Provide resources for educators, scholars, and general
audiences."


Via Anne Whaits, Dennis T OConnor
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Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica

Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Chris Foreman:

Ars Technica"One of the biggest challenges in the field of digital librarianship is simply trying to evolve as fast as technology," Pike said, "because we need to also keep up..."

 

Robin Pike (certified archivist currently serving as a Digital Collections Librarian at the University of Maryland):

"We are the custodians of what has been created and are enabling access—ideally free and unlimited—for the future," Pike said. "No matter what is created and where it is created, if it is important, some librarian, archivist, or records manager is capturing it and saving it for the future. In addition to saving the digital objects, we need to make them accessible so people can use and reuse the materials."

"We are the custodians of human history."


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries

Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Michel-Adrien:

"At a session this morning at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) in Toronto, New York-based consultant Nigel Holloway outlined some of the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among CALL members."

 

"Some 140 law librarians responded, about one quarter of the CALL membership, with two fifths of respondents coming from law firms, a bit over one third from from courthouse libraries, and about one sixth from universities. More than 50% of respondents worked in small libraries (1-3 staff), more or less 20% in medium-sized libraries (4-9), and about one quarter in libraries with more than 10 staff members."

[...]

"The survey is quite revealing about the trend toward digital content. Right now, some 45% of respondents state that more than 40% of their content is in digital format. 70% of respondents expect this to be the situation by 2014."

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10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities

10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Staff Writers:

"In honor of School Library Month, check out the ways libraries are going to blossom in the coming years."

 

"[...] the almost uncanny ability to consistently adapt to the changing demands of the local populace and emerging technology alike. The library system probably won’t disappear anytime soon, but rather, see itself blossoming into something new and exciting in congruence with today’s myriad informational demands."

 

1. More technology

2. Sensory story times

3. Better outreach to ESOL and ESL adults & children

4. Automation

5. Emphasizing community space

6. More social media savvy

7. Digital media labs

8. Electronic outposts

9. Crowdsourcing

10. More active librarians

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Going Digital: How to Prepare for the End of Optical Media

Going Digital: How to Prepare for the End of Optical Media | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @librarythingtim: How to Prepare for the End of Optical Media http://t.co/vYQAKBQs ;

 

Although written from a personal digitization viewpoint, it is also valid information for librarians and archivists.

- Audio discs

- DVDs

- Software

- Backups (including cloud)

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The Labs @ Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Developing Policies & Ordering Equipment | Library as Incubator Project

The Labs @ Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Developing Policies & Ordering Equipment | Library as Incubator Project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Guest blogger Emily Fear to showcase a new digital literacy initiative at CLP called The Labs. For this installment, we examine the nuts and bolts of launching a digital makerspace in a large library system by taking a look at policies and equipment.

"The official launch of the The Labs is two months away, and the team is laying the groundwork for what the project will become. Building a functional infrastructure for a project like this requires developing a set of uniform policies and procedures for each Lab site, as well as researching, ordering and cataloging the necessary equipment. While these processes don’t offer the immediate thrills of watching teens develop their filmmaking or music production skills, they are necessary steps to ensure The Labs are a success.

New cables and equipment!
The selection process for equipment and software is based on several factors. Ideas were gleaned from pre-existing digital learning lab models, such as Chicago Public Library’s YouMedia and the Digital Media Lab at Skokie Public Library. The Labs coordinators also consulted with Drew Davidson of Carnegie Mellon University’s Entertainment Technology Center and Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s programming partners Hip Hop On L.O.C.K and Pittsburgh Filmmakers and the CLP – Main Teen Advisory Council. The overall mission of The Labs also has influence over equipment and software purchases; items are assessed for how accessible and easy they will be to use."

"Corey Wittig, Digital Services Librarian at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, took the number of Lab spaces and the program’s budget into account and had to limit purchases to what is absolutely necessary for each site, prompting the current emphasis on ordering items that have the most potential for use. Quality and affordability have been important in choosing key Labs software and equipment– iMacs, MacBook laptops, basic audio and video recording devices and cables–but accessibility is also a top concern. Most teens should be able to come into a Labs site and use the resources with relative ease. Digital media recording and editing software like Apple’s iMovie and GarageBand, however basic, are perfect for beginners, yet still handy for more advanced creators. As Wittig says, “You don’t necessarily need top of the line equipment or software,” because what most Pittsburgh teens need are the tools to get started."


Via Buffy J. Hamilton
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A New World of Data | American Libraries Magazine

A New World of Data | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Karen Coyle:

"With the visible speed-up of all forms of information resources, even those that are ostensibly in traditional offline formats, doubts are growing about the ability of libraries to afford the costs of hand-hewn bibliographic control today and in the future.

Linking and federating

What if you extrapolate from developments within library systems, such as federated searching, enhanced catalogs, and OpenURL, to the idea of libraries on the web?"

[...]

"The Semantic Web will develop in two ways: First, by linking information that exists within documents, and second, by making the data itself accessible on the web. The ability to mark up information in documents could allow smarter access to that information than we get with keyword searching. For example, markup could identify the author of a document so that an author search could be done, something search engines do not provide today."


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Film Archivists in China: the 2012 FIAF congress, by David Walsh | IWM Research Blog

Film Archivists in China: the 2012 FIAF congress, by David Walsh | IWM Research Blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"...archivists were understandably confused by the sheer scale and rapidity of the changes to their world brought about by digital technology. And so a good deal of the proceedings set about addressing some of these concerns, not least the workshop organised jointly by the Technical Commission (of which I am the head) and the Programming and Access Commission, where we looked at the digital world from different perspectives and tried to offer some guidance on acquisition, management, preservation and access. (Some of the guidance we offered is now available in a few handy documents on the FIAF website).

Our fellow commission, Cataloguing and Documentation, have also worked hard to push for worldwide implementation of an important new European standard for film metadata (EN 15907:2009), and are hoping that this will become an ISO standard shortly. To boost their case, they had the British Film Institute to present their successful adoption of CEN standards in their new Adlib database (the first organisation to do so). This commission is also working on a revised set of cataloguing rules which will be compliant with this standard.

FIAF retains a very strong interest in analogue film technology, and there are many who view the demise of this traditional technology not just as regrettable, but as something to be resisted at all costs. In this context, when the Technical Commission wondered in passing whether it should investigate the feasibility of film archives manufacturing their own film stock when all the big players (Kodak, Fuji) decide to drop it, the FIAF delegates were understandably excited. Establishing a cottage industry for film stock seems implausible to many, but I suspect that unless we can come up with definitive evidence to support this view, the idea will not rest."

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E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education

E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Howard:

 

James R. Mouw  (University of Chicago Library):

First, if there are going to be print and digital versions, they should be available at the same time, so the library can decide which best suits its needs.

Second, digital monographs need to be made available in a way that allows the library to pick and choose and not make duplicate purchases.

Third, the Chicago library strongly prefers to buy digital content that’s guaranteed be permanently accessible, “so we essentially own it,” Mouw said.

 

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Digital age takes libraries off the shelf > Ryan Stokes - The Age

Digital age takes libraries off the shelf > Ryan Stokes - The Age | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Age: Digital age takes libraries off the shelf"

writes Catherine Armitage:

 

Ryan Stokes ... "new technology can enable more people to enjoy collections."

 

"In his own words, Stokes brings a "great interest" and ''passion'' for the "treasures that are in the library, the uniqueness of that material and its meaning to Australia"."

He is also an admirer of the world-leading work the library has done in digitising the physical collections and archiving material that originates in digital form, such as websites."

 

"The ability to interact with libraries via the internet means log-ins will be no less important than in-person visits as a measure of the reach of libraries, especially when the national broadband network is in operation.
"We are only at the beginning of conceiving how we can use that capacity," Schwirtlich says. The amount of data the library can supply and the way people interact with it will be transformed. Curatorial experts physically visible to community groups or classes on the other side of the country will be able to conduct virtual tours of collections.
Stokes says "continuing to enrich the experiences available for free" remains a core objective for the NLA under his stewardship.
Schwirtlich reminds that, powerful as it is, Google does not pay for and provide access to the mass of information resources in libraries, which have always played a vital social role in giving people access to information regardless of their wealth."
The ''purposeful, long-term, methodical, expert work of collecting, cataloguing and archiving'' remains vital to the nation, she says. "The future is tethered, shaped, informed and nourished by the past."

 

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/digital-life-news/digital-age-takes-libraries-off-the-shelf-20120629-217fj.html#ixzz1zS744at1

 

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Librarians Learn to Move beyond Text | American Libraries Magazine

Librarians Learn to Move beyond Text | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Submitted by George Eberhart on Tue, 06/26/2012 - 13:50


By Sara Zettervall, Cognotes
“When we’re looking for ourselves in kids, we don’t always see what we expect to see.” That statement from Stephen Abram, library futurist, was the takeaway lesson at the ALSC/YALSA Joint President’s Program on Monday.

Michelle Poris, quant savant at the market research and strategic consulting firm Smarty Pants, revealed that, of several hundred young people who participated in her study on digital activity, 68% agreed that “grownups need to do a better job of finding out what’s important to kids.” She particularly wanted librarians to be aware that 50%–60% of young teens feel stress daily, as they face pressure to juggle multiple tasks even as they’re prompted to begin preparing for college in middle school. They see this message online as well as hear it in school, and their stress is compounded by packed schedules in which homework and organized sports crowd out relaxation time."

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Pittsburgh – The Role of the Library in a Digital World « Workshop Slideshare

Pittsburgh – The Role of the Library in a Digital World « Workshop Slideshare | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

POSTED BY BOBBI NEWMAN:

"Presented at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh June 4th, 2012."

 

"Resources:
The original 23 Things

Additional 23 Things

IMLS 21st Century Skills Assessment

IMLS 21st Century Skills website

Managing Personal Change

Wasting Time Is New Divide in Digital Era - New York Times mentioned during presentation. ALA’s response to the article - ALA Wastes No Time – Our Work on Digital Literacy"

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