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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Tame The Web: Libraries and Technology: Flickr for Librarians

Tame The Web: Libraries and Technology: Steal this Idea: Flickr for Librarians: http://t.co/YKjGbKEB...

 

16 Ways To Use flickr @ Your Library, by Mickey Coalwell

 

1. Publicize EVENTS at your library with candid photos of activities and participants.

2. Present a collection of HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS of a city, community, area, or building – how about your own library?

3. Highlight OUTREACH SERVICES such as a bookmobile or delivery vehicle, along with outreach staff and drivers.

4. Publicize a GAMING tournament or other teen event.

5. Show photographs from an AUTHOR SIGNING at your library.

6. Show the BANNED BOOKS DISPLAYS at your library.

7. Promote and share a CONFERENCE OR WORKSHOP.

8. Provide a VIRTUAL TOUR of your library facility.

9. Share photos of PARTIES AND CELEBRATIONS at the library.

10. Show pictures of regular COMMUNITY MEETINGS held at your library.

11. Provide a gallery of LIBRARY STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS.

12. Create WIKIS OR INSTRUCTIONAL WEB SITES for staff on library technical topics.

13. Promote your Friends group's FUNDRAISERS and BOOK SALES.

14. Create a VIRTUAL TRAVELOGUE of your city or town.

15. Post pictures of your ADMINISTRATORS OR LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES.

16. Show BOOK COVERS for reading lists or Readers' Advisory blogs.
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osarome ogbebor: Email Marketing for Librarians—Made Simple

osarome ogbebor: Email Marketing for Librarians—Made Simple | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Osarome Ogbebor:

"In an era in which most of us are practically buried alive on a daily basis by email and other electronic communications, many libraries send few if any emails to their constituents.

 

It turns out that there are three main aspects to this trend:

 

1) many libraries do not have their own opt-in email lists;

2) at some corporate and academic libraries, use of the organization’s email list is either restricted or librarians are simply reluctant to use it to promote library services; and 3) librarians are laboring under a common misconception that email marketing is far too difficult or time consuming for them to handle."

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Recommended Websites From A Children's Librarian

Recommended Websites From A Children's Librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Busy children’s librarians use the internet everyday for professional development, assisting patrons, readers’ advisory, program planning and ordering library materials.

 

Intertwined in the use of the web for work and personal use, are the myriad websites a youth librarian uses regularly to stay in touch with what is going on in the world of children’s librarianship, public libraries, popular culture, children’s literature and forthcoming new children’s books. Without a doubt, there are a dizzying array of blogs, social media outlets, websites and other online tools to choose from."

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Top 10 Social Media and Libraries Predictions for 2012

Top 10 Social Media and Libraries Predictions for 2012 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Insightful points by AnnaLaura Brown:

 

"1. We will see a sharp increase in the number of libraries that have mobile friendly websites or library related applications for mobile phones.

2. More libraries will use youtube videos and other videos as a marketing channel and as an education medium.

3. We will see an increase in libraries using social media to educate rather than just to market resources and services.

4. Google Plus will increase in popularity and more libraries will develop pages on the site although Google Plus will still not be as popular as facebook.

5. More libraries will seek ways to create mobile apps for various uses and not just for the library website.

6. As more database vendors create mobile apps, libraries will be able to offer more services to patrons via mobile.

7. Book review sites such as Goodreads and Library Thing will be used by more libraries as tools for offering book reviews and for locating new books to read.

8. Libraries will adapt more open source programs for all aspects of running the library.

9. More libraries will find ways to use online gaming as a marketing and educational tool.

10. More libraries will use Google apps for a variety of functions including email."

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Metadata an overview - Slideshare

a brief overview and introduction to metadata from how it is used on the web (including seo and tagging) to its use in Flickr and library catalogs.
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Is It Time to Rebuild & Retool Public Libraries and Make “TechShops”?

Is It Time to Rebuild & Retool Public Libraries and Make “TechShops”? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Let’s explore what could be ahead for public libraries and how we could collectively transform them into “factories” — not factories that make things, but factories that help make people who want to learn and make things.

Will libraries go away? Will they become hackerspaces, TechShops, tool-lending libraries, and Fab Labs, or have these new, almost-public spaces displaced a new role for libraries?

 

For many of us, books themselves are tools. In the sense that books are tools of knowledge, the library is a repository for tools, so will we add “real tools” for the 21st century?

 

Before we dive into the future, let’s take a look at the current public library scene now. Feel free to skip this part. I think it’s pretty interesting though."

 

[...]

 

"But why does it matter? Some of you will likely say that hackerspaces and TechShops are filling the void where a public library could have evolved to — that’s probably true. I think public libraries are one of those “use it or lose” it things we have in a society. Given the current state of budgets all over the USA, I think unless they’re seen as the future, we might just lose them.

 

How can we encourage American innovation?How can we get kids access to laser cutters, CAD, 3D printers, and tools to design and build?How can we train each other for the jobs and skills needed in the 21st century?How can we spark the creativity and imagination of kids?How can America be a world leader in design and engineering?"

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Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2011: The Digital Library

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2011:  The Digital Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Audrey Watters:

"Part 5 of my year-end series. As far as ed-tech trends go, 2011 was not the year of the e-textbook.

-Hooray E-Books

-Boo Textbooks

-Digital Textbooks: Not Quite

-The Library Innovates

-Amazon versus the Publishers versus Libraries

-The Library as Community Learning Space"

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Libraries collaborate to increase digital content offerings

Libraries collaborate to increase digital content offerings | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Local libraries are participating in a statewide pool to buy a lot of new digital content in 2012 for increasingly popular electronic reading and listening devices.
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“Getting the Most out of Academic Libraries and Librarians

“Getting the Most out of Academic Libraries and Librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

“Getting the Most out of Academic Libraries – and Librarians”. Posted on December 10, 2011 by UT Librarians."

"Article on current levels of student proficiency at being able to assess, critically, electronic resources – nothing new, but reaffirms current views."

 

Carol Saller:

"The group [academic librarians] unanimously perceived a lack of skills among its clientele: Students are routinely flummoxed as to how to search for or evaluate the sources they need in their work. But even as librarians are poised to teach information technology through classes, online tutorials, and one-on-one sessions, actually laying hold of student time and attention depends on faculty support—and that is not always easy to find.

 

The extent to which college students are unprepared to conduct research may be surprising to those who assume that young adults are automatically proficient at any computer-related task. “Many students don’t actually know how to interpret the citations that they find in print or online, and as a result, they don’t understand what to search for,” says Georgiana McReynolds, management and social-sciences librarian at MIT. “They search for book chapters in Google because they don’t recognize a book citation compared to an article citation. Or they don’t know which is the title of the article as opposed to the title of the journal. Or they can’t decipher all the numbers that define the volume, issue, and date.”

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The library alternative « the future!

The library alternative « the future! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @micahsb: One of the best articles on the future of libraries that I've ever read - by Peter Brantley http://t.co/AsbVzLOU...

 

"Every lending library is a partnership between authors, publishers, and communities. For both traditional publishing and the growing number of self-publishing authors and literary agents, a new generation public library collective presents both tactical and strategic advantages."

 

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Best library / librarian blog 2011 | The Edublog Awards

Best library / librarian blog 2011 | The Edublog Awards | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Nominations listed for the best librarian blog 2011

 

Best library / librarian blog 2011 http://t.co/nLtJH6xb via @AddThis just voted for @gwynethjones :)...

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Data Shows Library Visits at Historic High (National Humanities Alliance)

1.59 billion visits in 2009  (Think libraries are dead?)

 

"December 2, 2011 – Data analyzed from the FY 2009 Public Library Survey (PLS), a census of public libraries in the 50 states, DC, and the territories, shows a 24.4% increase in library visits per capita in the last ten years, with total visits increasing by nearly 40%. In 2009 (the most recent data available) libraries were visited a record-breaking 1.59 billion times, reports the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

"People depend on libraries now more than ever," said IMLS Director Susan Hildreth in a press release. "Not only do visits and circulation continue to rise, the role of public libraries in providing Internet resources to the public continues to increase as well. Public libraries have also increased their program offerings to meet greater demand and provide more targeted services. Despite this demonstrated ability of libraries to adjust to meet the growing needs of the public, many libraries across the country face severe budget cuts. It’s important to remember that this data ends with 2009, before even more severe budget crises put so many libraries and library programs at risk."

The Institute’s analysis of the data showed that per capita visits and circulation rose in the century’s first decade. The number of public libraries increased during that period but not enough to keep pace with the rise in population. Library staffing remained stable, though the percentage of public libraries with degreed and accredited librarians increased."


Via Vesna Cosic
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Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries via LIS

Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries via LIS | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @LibraryJournal Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries http://t.co/xv1mE0Vl...

"Perhaps the greatest impediment for the transition from the tradition of the printed book to the ebook comes from the malleability of the etext. While it might not matter to the occasional or recreational reader, the ebook presents a host of challenges for the role of the book as transmitter, carrier, and shaper of our written word cultural heritage.Ubiquitous web and print ads tell individuals and libraries to “buy” ebooks. But long-term preservation and retention rights to stable content are not the norm, because many resellers and vendors don’t possess those rights from the publisher or author. Instead of true ownership, most ebook “purchases” are more like leases, and leases with few residual rights at that. The only way to assure continuing access and storage for an ebook is a permanent download to a device with rights not governed by strict DRM (Digital Rights Management) systems. With content delivered from a hosted service on the web (aka the cloud), the “purchaser” has no control over the content. Even Google Books bears the disclaimer:

[I]f Google or the applicable copyright holder loses the rights to provide you any Digital Content, Google will cease serving such Digital Content to you and you may lose the ability to use such Digital Content."

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8 Online Libraries For Students, Teachers, And Researchers

8 Online Libraries For Students, Teachers, And Researchers | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Rean:

"Have you grown tired asking Google to find eBooks for you? Then why not directly go to online libraries with thousands and millions of collections entirely focused for books?

 

That’s the reason why I gathered the 8 best online libraries that students, teachers, and researches can use freely. Millions of books, hundreds of categories, and definitely for free!"

 

1. Project Gutenberg

2. The Free Library

3. Planet eBook

4. LibriVox

5. Wikibooks

6. Scribd

7. Ibiblio

8. GetCited

 

 

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Checking Out 2011 | We Are Librarians

Checking Out 2011 | We Are Librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Here are some highlights of New York Times coverage about libraries and librarians in 2011"

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Fundraising key to Regina libraries' revival

Fundraising key to Regina libraries' revival | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Eight years after financial hardship nearly closed three public library branches and cut 27 jobs, the Regina Public Library Board is now experiencing budget surpluses and working on its infrastructure and maintenance needs.

"Mayor Pat Fiacco, a member of the library board in 2003, originally supported the proposed cuts. He said the library system is in “far better shape” today because of alternative sources of revenue, namely the library’s Home Lottery.

According to the library board’s 2011 budget, an operating surplus of $364,700 was expected, a decrease from 2010 when the surplus was $455,700. The 2011 budget also has an operating revenue of $18.6 million. A large portion of the revenue $14.9 million is from the city’s tax levy."

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Fundraising+Regina+libraries+revival/5928477/story.html#ixzz1iDGG8D1D

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Why Don’t Librarians Collaborate More?

Why Don’t Librarians Collaborate More? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
After reading a lot of literature on libraries in this 21st Century, it finally struck me that one area in which I have read virtually nothing is collaboration among librarians.

Via Dailin Shaido
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The three main types of library

The three main types of library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Indexer:

"Libraries the whole world over are under threat, mainly because the people who fund them are under the mistaken impression that they are no longer needed in the age of the Internet. I used to be a full-time librarian, but I lost my job in 2002 for that very reason. The company that employed me took the view that because it was "all on the Internet" there was no reason why they should employ somebody to do what everybody could do for themselves from their desktop.

 

Not surprisingly, we librarians have a different take on the matter. We believe that libraries and librarians are hugely important and will continue to be so. Indeed, the ironic thing is that the availability of information via the World Wide Web makes us even more important and vital!

 

We want to dispel a few misconceptions and make more converts to the cause, not just because we want to keep our jobs, but because we don't want people to miss out on the benefits that libraries can bring.

 

First of all, what do you understand by the word Library? Do you appreciate just how wide-ranging libraries are? For starters, there are three main types of library, which I shall outline in the rest of this hub."

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Library Connect News: Defining a Librarian in the Information Age: Can it be done?

Library Connect News: Defining a Librarian in the Information Age: Can it be done? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

RT @NazlinBhimani: Library Connect -Defining a Librarian in the Information Age http://t.co/51OZD8oz...

 

 

 

Answer this question:

 

"A Librarian in the information age is most like a ____________________________ because ____________________________."

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Libaries – a case for renewal | What's Next: Top Trends

Libaries – a case for renewal | What's Next: Top Trends | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Libraries – a case for renewal http://t.co/oTxICmJX #future #libraries via @ellenforsyth...

 

Dr. Wendy L. Schultz:

 

"Library 2.0: Product


How should the library package its commodity – books – as products in an environment that disintermediates, dematerialises, and decentralises? Chad and Miller’s essay, and the debates and conversations around it, raise this question and answer it with the characteristics of our emerging information infrastructure: the library is everywhere, barrier-free, and participatory. Collaborate with Amazon; provide digital downloads of books; create a global, and globally accessible, catalog; invite readers to tag and comment. Yet as more information becomes more accessible, people will still need experienced tour guides – Amazon’s customer recommendations are notoriously open to manipulation; tagclouds offer diverse connections, not focussed expertise. This will drive the transition to Library 3.0: the 3D service.

 

Library 3.0 – Web 3D to Library 3D: Service.


There are SecondLife (3) subscribers who spend more than forty hours a week online, immersed in its virtual graphic world. Digital natives take 2.0 for granted; they are buzzing over Web 3D. Carrying Chad and Miller’s argument through this next phase transition, we arrive at virtual collections in the 3D world, where books themselves may have avatars and online personalities. But the avalanche of material available will put a premium on service, on tailoring information to needs, and on developing participatory relationships with customers. So while books may get in your 3D face all by themselves, people will prefer personal introductions – they will want a VR info coach. Who’s the best librarian avatar? How many Amazon stars has your avatar collected from satisfied customers? This could create librarian “superstars” based on buzz and customer ratings. People will collect librarians rather than books – the ability not just to organise, but also to annotate and compare books and other information sources, from a variety of useful perspectives."

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