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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Steal This Idea: How Libraries Can Become Community Publishers | Digital Book World

Steal This Idea: How Libraries Can Become Community Publishers | Digital Book World | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Nate Hill:

"Here is one good way to turn public libraries into centers for community publishing.

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Cyberpunk Librarian: Why You Need to Remove Your Google Search History

Cyberpunk Librarian: Why You Need to Remove Your Google Search History | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Daniel Messer:

Cyberpunk Librarian: "Why You Need to Remove Your Google Search History (RT @TheLiB: If you're a librarian, you don't want to be logged in to Google when you're doing searches for your users."

 

"... the Electronic Frontier Foundation posted a how to on removing your search data from Google and why you should. [...] What I’m going to do is build on that for a second and tell you why you as a librarian need to remove that data.

I use Google all day, every day. I’m sure you do too. I don’t know about you, but I’m also signed into Google while I’m doing it. I check my Gmail, I’m dealing with Google+, setting up appointments using Google Calendar, and so on.

And I’m also searching for information regarding patron queries while I’m signed in. What that means is that there is data within my own data set that has nothing to do with me. There are laws, ethics, and all kinds of reasons why patron information is confidential and, until March 1, 2012, that information on Google is confidential. After March 1st, Google will use that data to build a better Google which means offering you better ads, recommending videos, and that kind of thing.

But that data isn’t mine, or at least part of it isn’t mine. It’s data that was generated helping a library patron. I propose to you that such data, for all intents and purposes, belongs to the patron. That data wouldn’t have been generated if not for the patron, just like a library card wouldn’t have been generated if a patron hadn’t applied for one. Since we, as librarians, are tasked with protecting patron information, we need to protect that information too."

 

Electronic Frontier post here: www.eff.org/ ;

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BeerBrarian: A Modest Defense of QR Codes in the Library

BeerBrarian: A Modest Defense of QR Codes in the Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"At my place of work, QR codes work.

We have limited goals for them, and they suffice. And we're not alone. There's a wiki page devoted to using QR codes in library settings, mentioning what works, and what does.

Our most popular library blog post achieved that distinction almost solely because I papered the campus with these flyers on January 17th, 2012. There were 80 views via the QR coded embedded on the flyer, far more than the results for the traditional way of viewing the blog, via a browser and mouse click. All that in 48 hours, on a campus with a full-time enrollment of 2400 students. In part, this is a function of our user population. Many, if not most, do not own a computer, or have internet access, but many, if not most, own a smartphone. In sum, we know our audience and we have limited aims for how we use QR codes."

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Libraries build communities | Reading, Writing, Research

Libraries build communities | Reading, Writing, Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

DMGuion:

"Libraries are about more than books or reading. They also sponsor concerts, lectures, workshops, classes, and similar events."

 

"Many libraries have auditoriums and offer various kinds of concerts, plays, or lectures. Many libraries have space for exhibiting art and perhaps a collection to display in it. Whether it has its own art collection or not, it can offer its exhibit space to both local and traveling arts organizations.
Libraries usually have meeting rooms, where all sorts of clubs and interest groups can gather. In today’s economy, workshops on various aspects of job hunting may draw people in to the library who otherwise may not have thought to use it."

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E-Book Library Lending Rises, Publishing Industry Grapples With Change | Digital Book World

E-Book Library Lending Rises, Publishing Industry Grapples With Change | Digital Book World | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Barbara Galletly:

"E-books have become a core part of U.S. publishers’ business. Libraries and booksellers have built e-book lending programs. What is the future of e-lending?"

 

"We’re witnessing a sea change in e-book library lending. As more players become involved in the market, the traditional roles of publisher, distributor, bookseller, and library are beginning to blur. One thing is clear, though: As publishers struggle to sell and market their wares in a world of declining retail space, libraries become more valuable. If digital shelf space at libraries proves to have similar effect as its physical counterpart, to serve libraries and their patrons digitally is to cultivate customers of the future."

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Three-year study asserts benefits of school libraries on student learning

Three-year study asserts benefits of school libraries on student learning | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Lauren T. Taniguchi:

 

"From staff reports TRENTON — The New Jersey Association of School Librarians (NJASL) released findings on Wednesday of a three-year study conducted by the Center for International Scholarship in School Libraries (CISSL) at Rutgers University..."

 

Some of the findings:

 

"School librarians make key contributions to student success, including:

• Improvements in student test scores;

• Development of thinking-based competencies in using information, and development of positive and ethical values in relation to the use of information and technology and

• Increased interest in reading, increased participation in reading, the development of wider reading interests and becoming readers who are more discriminating.

In phase two, which was completed in November 2011, CISSL examined a sample of effective school libraries to identify the key criteria that enables these libraries to thrive and contribute to the learning agendas of the schools.

Findings show that in those schools:

• The school library is a learning center linked to classroom instruction;

• The school library supports the school’s mission to produce literate and informed learners who can thrive in a digital, knowledge-based world;

• The school library is a 21st-century classroom that provides an understanding of the information..."

 

Read more: http://www.nj.com/cumberland/index.ssf/2012/02/three-year_study_asserts_benef.html 

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TOC 2012: LeVar Burton, Libraries and The Bookstore of the Future

TOC 2012: LeVar Burton, Libraries and The Bookstore of the Future | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Calvin Reid:

"O’Reilly Media’s Tools of Change conference returned to New York with a typical high profile slate focused on publishing innovation driven by technology and a new vision of just what publishing can mean.

 This year’s TOC kicked off with an inspirational keynote by actor, director and now digital entrepreneur, LeVar Burton, before turning quickly to the big issues surrounding libraries and e-book lending and a new and breathtaking vision of independent bookselling."

 

 

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Daily Maverick :: Johannesburg's new library feeds a city's 'tree of knowledge'

Daily Maverick :: Johannesburg's new library feeds a city's 'tree of knowledge' | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The Johannesburg City Library was closed in April 2009 for a much-needed facelift. Some three years and R68-million later, the library reopened on Tuesday transformed physically and functionally.

 

"The emphasis on public libraries as a means to democratise information is certainly not new. Since the late 19th century, public libraries have been at the centre of the process to redistribute knowledge and information to the educationally underprivileged and this is no more apparent than in the history of the Johannesburg library."

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Public Libraries, 3D Printing, FabLabs and Hackerspaces - video

Public Libraries, 3D Printing, FabLabs and Hackerspaces - video | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Video of Lauren’s final project for the “Innovation in Public Libraries” class taught by Meg Backus and Thomas Gokey

 

"We want to see 3D printing, FabLabs and Hackerspaces become a regular feature--in addition to its other services--at every public library in the country. This is a description of our proposal to create a FabLab in the Fayetteville Free Library and gives a brief introduction to what 3D printing is and how revolutionary it will be for those who are unfamiliar with it. A FabLab is a fabrication laboratory (or a fabulous laboratory).

A hackerspace is just a public library under a different name (although I’m not aware of any hackerspaces that are publicly funded, its time to change that!).

It is a place where people gather to share their knowledge and help each other make whatever project they are currently working on. This video was made in support of Lauren Britton-Smedley’s proposal to create a pilot FabLab at the Fayetteville Free Library.

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Libraries respond to Penguin, and it’s not pretty

Libraries respond to Penguin, and it’s not pretty | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Fallout continues over Penguin’s decision to terminate its contract with library ebook distributor OverDrive — an action that meant its ebooks would not be available for libraries.

 

"Reaction amongst librarians was swift, and emphatic. Sarah Houghton, Director of California’s San Rafael Public Library, posted a sign in her library (see photo right), which she also made available for anyone to download on Google Docs, identifying not only Penguin but all the major publishers who, as a statement on the library’s website put it, ”currently refuse to sell or license eBooks to libraries” — including names and phone numbers of people to contact at each one."

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