The Information Professional
18.0K views | +0 today
Follow
The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from 21st Century Information Fluency
Scoop.it!

The 6 Best Online Bibliography Tools, Posted by Katie Lepi

The 6 Best Online Bibliography Tools, Posted by Katie Lepi | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
If helping your students write papers is a part of your school day, you probably already know that there are enough issues to focus on without having to spend a lot of time teaching your students how to build a bibliography and correctly cite their sources. Your time is likely better spent helping create a focused, concise piece of work that uses excellent grammar and sentence structure.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Librarysoul
Scoop.it!

Pegasus Librarian | Learning in Libraries and Loving It > good searching

Pegasus Librarian | Learning in Libraries and Loving It > good searching | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

IRIS: "Good searching really isn’t about searching"


Via Trudy Raymakers
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Envisioning the library of the future - online survey

Online survey:

 

"This website aims to capture your views on the purpose and value of public libraries.

This is part of a piece of research entitled Envisioning the library of the future, commissioned by Arts Council England. This programme of research will inform the development of the Arts Council’s long-term vision for public libraries in England. This research began in February 2012, with the findings due to be published in a final report in the Autumn 2012.

Along with this online element, we are also undertaking focused research in face-to-face workshops with members of the public in various parts of the country so that we have a wide range of people contributing to our discussion and developing ideas.

The website is open for receiving your comments until Sunday 21 October 2012."

 

Envisioning the library of the future: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/supporting-libraries/libraries-consultation

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Durff
Scoop.it!

10 Free Tools for Everyday Research to Teach Search Skills

10 Free Tools for Everyday Research to Teach Search Skills | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"As educators we are faced with the challenge of teaching students to efficiently use the Internet to find and use information. Searching for information and making sense of it is a process that involves critical thinking and it is an important skill. Fortunately, there are many free digital tools available to help students efficiently sift through an overwhelming abundance of web content to find the relevant and reliable information they need. This post will explore some digital resources to provide educators with tools to help all students become savvy searchers and independent learners."

 

Susan Oxnevad shares a wealth of other tools and resources to teach students how to search.

 

" - Google Search Education

  - Google Custom Search

  - The Find Tool

  - Oolone

  - Twurdy

  - instaGrok

  - Qwiki Reference

  - Reliable Search Engines: 

iPL2 -A public service organization and a learning/teaching environment manned by students and volunteer librarians which features searchable resource collections for kids and teens, as well as an a“Ask a librarian” section.
Sweet Search - A Search Engine for Students. It searches only credible Web sites approved by Internet research experts
KidsClick! – A web search site designed for kids by librarians – with kid-friendly results!"

 

 

>>Extremely valuable for librarians as well!


Via Anne Whaits, Dennis T OConnor, Jason Ertz, Lisa Durff
more...
Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 9:48 PM
HI Elizabeth. Thank you for the recent rescoops and for following my topic. I hope that it is helpful for you. Best of luck!
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

10 Questions to Ask a Research Facility Before You Visit

By Kimberly Powell:

 

"Whether you're planning a trip to the State Historical Society, the Family History Library, the National Archives or the local courthouse, it pays to be prepared. Avoid frustration and increase your research time by asking these 10 question in advance of your visit.
1. What are the regular research hours?

2. Are there any holidays or special closures?

3. In what form are the records available?

4. Are there any record restrictions that will affect research?

5. What unique records or collections are available?

6. Are there restrictions on copying?

7. What can and can't I bring with me to the facility? Anything I absolutely need to bring?

8. What are the best times to visit?

9. Is there a lunchroom? Nearby parking? Public transportation?

10. Is there a particular archivist, librarian or staff member who specializes in my area of interest?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

What is a librarian without a library? – another perspective

What is a librarian without a library? – another perspective | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
By Felicity Cross of the Scottish Law Librarians Group
"Recently whenever I have been thinking about being a law librarian and what that means the issue of space has kept popping up.
To try and come to some conclusions about what it is exactly that I do, I thought about the different parts of my job role. And distilling them all down to their smallest common denominator; I found that it is to provide our fee earners with time and space. This may sound a little bit grandiose but bear with me.

We save time for our fee earner by analysing and searching through the best resources to make sure they have the right information at the right time, that it is up-to-date and reliable. We provide space by filtering that information, providing them with only what is relevant to their specific circumstances; clearing a space for them to think in a world filled with seemingly endless amounts of information. We give them the space and time that they need to provide the best service possible to our clients."
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Future Librarian
Scoop.it!

Academic Librarian Research: A Survey of Attitudes, Involvement, and Perceived Capabilities

Academic Librarian Research: A Survey of Attitudes, Involvement, and Perceived Capabilities | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

One of the interesting articles in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries (September 2012) is this article on the development and results of a recent survey of academic librarians about their attitudes, involvement, and perceived capabilities using and engaging in primary research. The purpose of the survey was to inform the development of a continuing education program in research design.

 

"This article contributes a new perspective on the topic of how librarians think of their own abilities to conduct research with the introduction of a confidence scale and opens a line of inquiry for possible future research activities related to self-efficacy and research productivity..."


"Two other potentially profitable research agendas are identified in this article: defining a research culture in a library setting and performing a systematic review of published academic librarian practitioner-researchers to learn how to replicate their success."

 

The article (as well as all the articles in this issue) are available for download in pdf and html here: http://crl.acrl.org/content/73/5/431.full.pdf+html


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The rise of e-reading - Pew Internet Research

The rise of e-reading - Pew Internet Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
21% of Americans have read an e-book. The increasing availability of e-content is prompting some to read more than in the past and to prefer buying books to borrowing them.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Information Specialist's Scoop
Scoop.it!

Big Changes at Google Scholar | Law Technology Today

Big Changes at Google Scholar | Law Technology Today | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Perennial LPM authors Carole Levitt and Mark Rosch are responsible for this week’s guest post about Google Scholar:

"Google is known for constantly working to upgrade and improve its services – and Google Scholar is no exception. Often these improvements are introduced with little or no announcement or documentation. Some of these “improvements” are for the better and some are not."


Via Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Assessing the role of librarians in an Open Access world

This blog is to provide information to University of Melbourne Library staff.

 

Jennie Johnson, TBI Communications:

"Today, InTech – an Open Access (OA) publisher – has published the results of a survey appraising attitudes and awareness of the library community towards the OA business model in scholarly publishing.

The survey results suggest that although librarians have a good level of awareness and knowledge of OA, they believe their research communities are much less aware. Their work to educate their communities is hampered by lack of informational support materials.

Librarians remain broadly supportive of OA and the vast majority already feel the benefits of the model are being realized, or will be realized in the future. Despite this support, librarians in our sample were not actively involved in managing OA funds centrally, indeed, almost half were unaware of how OA charges are funded within their institution.

The greatest concern librarians have with OA center on the article processing charges being set too high. There is generally less concern with the quality of peer review or the potential incentive for publishers to focus on quantity over quality. Less than a quarter of librarians were concerned that OA could make their role and the services provided by the library less visible. Indeed, librarians see a strong future for the profession becoming more closely integrated with their research communities as a partner, educator and innovator.

For the full survey results summary, please visit: http://www.intechopen.com/open-access-su…

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The Public Library of 2020, by Steve Matthews | 21st Century Library Blog

The Public Library of 2020, by Steve Matthews | 21st Century Library Blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"According to Pew Research Center's “Pew Internet & American Life Project” they think they know what public libraries will be by the year 2020. I wouldn't question their research, but I'm skeptical about some of their conclusions..."

 

Conclusions drawn by Dr Steve Matthews:

- "The nature of the library customer is changing and will continue to change toward technology being an integral part of their life."

- Volume, relevance & velocity... "These three factors will continue to be a constant. However, in another 8 years there will be more customers who do not need librarians to filter their information, nor manage their information stream."

- Anywhere, anytime, any device... "This is a fact of life that will never go away. Librarians need to understand that and begin to work within it."

- Sentries, evaluators, filters, certifiers... "Pew was trying to appease the “old guard library establishment”, because none of their reported facts unquestionably leads to these roles. I don’t know from where they drew these roles, but they got this wrong. Customers in 2020 will not need any of these roles from librarians. They will fill these roles for themselves."

- Aggregator/Synthesizer, Organizer, Network Node, Facilitator... "These will be the roles of the 21st Century librarian, and library."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Information Specialist's Scoop
Scoop.it!

Libraries, Archives and Museums: A Strategic Conversation: Opening Talk

Monday, April 9 For generations Harvard's libraries, archives, and museums have been pre-eminent participants in support of the research ...youtube.com...

 

"For generations Harvard's libraries, archives, and museums have been pre-eminent participants in support of the research, teaching, and learning carried out both within the university, and also beyond its walls. In an increasingly connected global society, interdisciplinary work is becoming the norm and researchers increasingly seek and share information across formats, genres, and institutional settings. To support users and to continue to grow and thrive, libraries, archives, and museums must work and grow together as never before. This "strategic conversation" brings together those who have given thought to these issues. They have inspired changes and faced challenges along the way. Three presenters, one of each from the domains of libraries, archives, and museums, will outline the vision they bring to their institutions, how they envision the major points of commonality, their greatest hurdles, and how the lessons learned in collection development of physical collections, do or do not apply to collection development in the digital domain.
Libraries: Tom Hickerson, Vice Provost of Libraries and Cultural Resources, University of Calgary

Archives: David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States

Museums: Holly Witchey, Professor, Johns Hopkins University; Interim Director, Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts

Moderator: Gunter Waibel, Director, Digitization Program, Smithsonian"


Via Dave Allen, Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from 21st Century Information Fluency
Scoop.it!

How can Libraries Support Students Live and Learn with Digital Media?

How can Libraries Support Students Live and Learn with Digital Media? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

C. Shoemaker, H. Martin, B. Joseph (2010) How Using Social Media Forced a Library to Work on the Edge in Their Efforts to Move Youth From “Hanging Out” to “Messing Around, Journal of Media Literacy Education 2:2 (2010) 181 – 184

 

Full Text Research Paper.

 http://altechconsultants.netfirms.com/jmle1/index.php/JMLE/article/view/123/78

 

 

"In 2009, Mimi Ito released Hanging Out, Messing Around and Geeking Out: Living and Learning with New Media, a book composed of 23 related studies. These ethnographic studies interrogated how learning is being experienced by teens via informal uses of digital media. The title refers to the framework around how youth learn through digital media and networked spaces, a kind of learning that is quite often invisible to adults who often confuse it with playing, wasting time or, at worst, as undermining youth’s ethical values and social competencies. This collection of studies, however, finds that these three different modes of participation with digital media, in fact, support the development of a wide range of new media literacies. This is the challenge offered by Ito and the one recently taken up by the New York Public Library. This worked example is not designed to report the successes or failure of this pilot project. Rather, it is intended to explore and take a critical look at the obstacles encountered along the way and discuss how they were negotiated. Finally, it will leverage Ito’s framework to provide context to understand what it means to use digital media for learning and how to apply these lessons learned, both for this organization and others."


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Enabling the Research ‘Flow’ and Serendipity in Today’s Digital Library Environment – Library Hat

Enabling the Research ‘Flow’ and Serendipity in Today’s Digital Library Environment – Library Hat | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Enabling the #Research ‘Flow’ and Serendipity in Today’s Digital #Library Environment http://t.co/ZZ2SC9hV #Librarians #DigitalLibrary...

 

by Bohyun (Library Hat).:

"The fact that today’s libraries no longer control the physical surroundings of a library patron who is making use of their resources doesn’t mean that there are nothing libraries can do to make the research environment facilitate serendipitous discoveries and the state of ‘flow’ in a researcher’s mind, however. Today’s libraries offer many different systems for library users to access their online resources. As I have mentioned above, the interfaces of these systems can use some vast improvement in usability. When there are as few hindrances as possible for a library patron to get to what s/he is looking for either online or at the physical library space, s/he would be able to concentrate on absorbing the content more easily instead of being bogged down with procedures. The seamless interoperability between different systems would be very much desirable for researchers. So, improving the usability of library systems will take library patrons one step closer to obtaining the flow state in their research while using library resources online."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Library Corner
Scoop.it!

How to: use social media in newsgathering | How to succeed in journalism | Journalism.co.uk

How to: use social media in newsgathering | How to succeed in journalism | Journalism.co.uk | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
14 pointers on finding sources and stories using social media...

 

"Finding sources, nurturing contacts and checking facts by phone have long been key to successful journalism. This guide on using social media to research stories outlines the many ways reporters can put those traditional journalism skills into practice on social media platforms.

The first problem in searching is one of noise. According to figures from March, more than 1 billion tweets were being posted every three days, so how can journalists sort the social media chaos and find contacts and stories?

This guide gathers tips from Malachy Browne, news editor of social news gathering agency Storyful; David Wyllie, an editor at Breaking News, a social media breaking news service owned by NBC News; and investigative journalist and trainer in advanced online research skills Colin Meek."

 

>> Valuable to Information Professionals as well. 


Via Miguel Mimoso Correia
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

What Can Libraries Learn from New User (and Non-User!) E-Reading Data from the Pew Internet - Slideshare Project? | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

"At the Library 2.012 worldwide virtual conference, Pew Internet Research Analyst Kathryn Zickuhr and ALA Program Director Larra Clark will discuss key findings from these reports—including a brand new analysis focused on younger Americans' reading preferences and library use habits. The session also will explore immediate practical implications for U.S. public libraries."

 

Slideshare here: http://www.slideshare.net/PewInternet/what-can-libraries-learn-from-new-user-and-nonuserereading-data-from-the-pew-internet-project

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Inspired Librarians
Scoop.it!

Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences

Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Many librarians are still unwilling to fully embrace Google Scholar as a resource. Michelle C. Hamilton, Margaret M. Janz and Alexandra Hauser investigate whether Google Scholar has the accuracy, authority and currency to be trustworthy enough for scholars."


Via University of Nicosia Library
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Libraries, Telecentres, Cybercafes and Public Access to ICT: International Comparisons - Eldis

Authors: R. Gomez; IGI global 
Published: 2012


"The goal of this document is to portray the landscape of users and uses of public access to computers and the Internet in developing countries around the world. In 2007-2010, the Technology & Social Change Group at the University of Washington conducted a ground-breaking study in 25 countries, the Landscape Study, to better understand who uses information and communication technologies (ICT) in public access venues and how. Each country conducted a discrete section of the study and shared a report. All the data was then collated and analyzed. This book attempts to put all the pieces together in order to make comparisons and cross-references for further research."


Full text:

http://faculty.washington.edu/rgomez/publications/2012%20full%20book,%20libraries,%20telecenter