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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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MOOCs and libraries: Next steps? #MOOClib

MOOCs and libraries: Next steps? #MOOClib | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"...some positive and meaningful ways that librarians can engage with MOOCs.


the outcomes in 9 rough categories.

Get the library involvedStart talking/collaborating/sharing between librariesTake MOOCsGet in front of licensing and accessCreate MOOCsSupport MOOC facultySupport MOOC studentsCreate in-person support opportunitiesRe-assess library assumptions and practices

Of these, from my perspective, the things that every librarian can do is to take a MOOC, and contribute to the conversation by listening to others who have been invovled in MOOCs, and sharing information and experiences.


[...]

[This is the fourth posting in a short series on the forum on MOOCs and Libraries held by OCLC and the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, March 18th and 19th, 2013.]

This, alongside the copyright session, was the most meaty in terms of seeing where libraries are currently connecting with MOOCs — as I learned during my investigations, there are a lot of people with opinions about MOOCs and libraries, but not many folks with hands on experience. This session focused on where library research skills fit into MOOCs, where that might take us.


Karen du Toit's insight:

Very insightful blog post about the future for libraries with regards the impact of MOOCs!

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Upcoming First European MOOCs and Libraries Conference | Library Services | Open University

Upcoming First European MOOCs and Libraries Conference | Library Services | Open University | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
MOOCs and Libraries: the good, the bad and the uglyFriday July 12th, 2013 - Pullman Hotel, Central LondonThis one day event hosted by the Open University Library in partnership with OCLC Research and Jisc will focus on the challenges MOOCs pose to the traditional delivery of library services, and the opportunities they offer for libraries to rethink and revitalise their proposition. Participants will be brought up to speed with the latest MOOC developments around the world, but with a particular emphasis on developments in the UK. Speakers will share their experience of or thoughts about the impact MOOCs are having on library services across many sectors, on publishers, and on the higher education landscape. The event builds on a highly successful workshop held in Philadelphia in March, sponsored by OCLC and the University of Pennsylvania at which the Open University was the only institution from outside North America. The objectives of the day are as follows:To raise awareness among librarians of the impact of MOOCs on their environmentTo share experience of libraries involved in MOOCsTo discuss the strategic way forward for HE libraries in this changing landscape and develop a strategic roadmap
Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries vs MOOC being discussed and the way forward!

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The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech

The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
This isn't your childhood library. The Hunt Library at North Carolina State University is beautiful. The main floor looks more like a sleek Apple showroom than a stuffy library.
Karen du Toit's insight:
The library of the future!
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How to put libraries back at the heart of communities, by Brian Ashley - The Guardian

How to put libraries back at the heart of communities, by Brian Ashley - The Guardian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it


"Libraries have long been social gathering centres and provided sources of information for local communities.

But how is this role changing with the financial landscape and changes in the way we consume information?

We published a report recently called Envisioning the Library of the Future. In just over a year, and after speaking to more than 800 people, we have a piece of research that demonstrates the vital role that libraries can play in the success and wellbeing of the communities they serve.

Writing this report was important to us because we wanted to bring the research in this area up to date.

[...]

We always hoped that Envisioning the Library of the Future would energise the sector, looking beyond the immediate and important issues of funding and library closures towards formulating an approach that will ensure that libraries are seen as vital and relevant long into the future.

In the coming months and years, the aim is to see libraries at the heart of communities, helping us to understand ourselves, our place in the world, and the heritage of the communities in which we live."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Visions for libraries of the future! 

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UK Organization Publishes Research Into Public Library of the Future | LJ INFOdocket

UK Organization Publishes Research Into Public Library of the Future | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Gary Price
The research comes from the Arts Council of England and is found in a report titled, The Library of the Future.

 

This research has found that public libraries are trusted spaces, open to all, in which people continue to explore and share the joys of reading, information, knowledge and culture. It is clear that people value the services that libraries provide and will continue to do so. Indeed, there is a clear message that there is a compelling and continuing need for a publicly funded library service.

The research also reminds us that public libraries face many challenges in the coming years, including: advances in technology, which affect the ways in which people want to connect to information and culture; reduced public expenditure; the increasing involvement of citizens in the design and delivery of public services; and the needs of an ageing population.

Envisioning the library of the future and the work that comes from it will help us and our partners in the library sector to set out the value, role and purpose of public libraries with more clarity, pointing out ways they can respond to change in order to remain at the heart of their communities. This will provide the focus for our work in the future.

The research began in January 2012, and comprised three phases during which researchers spoke with more than 800 people. The research included an online survey which had over 1,400 responses, and 10,000 people viewed the online conversation. Read more on the research methodology.

Four priority areas

In order to foster a successful, sustainable library service in light of these challenges, the Arts Council has set out four priority areas for development which have been tested and corroborated by stakeholders:

place the library as the hub of the communitymake the most of digital technology and creative mediaensure that libraries are resilient and sustainabledeliver the right skills for those who work in libraries
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great priority areas for the library of the future!!

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Is a paperless library still a library? - Discussion

Is a paperless library still a library? - Discussion | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The concept of a library is going to be re-invented in Texas with the launch of a public library with digital rather than printed books.

 

Discussion from various quarters about the concept of paperless libraries!

Karen du Toit's insight:

My own opinion: There is still a place for a book, and a book in a library, especially if there is heritage value in it!

The space and place of a library is also evolving with the changing times, but the importance of a "library" in a community cannot be overlooked!

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Leadership in a Digital Age > #libraries| American Libraries Magazine

Leadership in a Digital Age > #libraries| American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Maureen Sullivan

Libraries are laboratories for deep learning

 

The increasingly digital context brings challenges and opportunities for librarians, library staff, archivists, and museum professionals. New roles and the competencies required to perform them are evolving. One overriding role for all of us is that of the leader. The complexity of the changes we experience leads to many unfamiliar situations in which deep learning is necessary to successfully work through the problems and challenges. Scholar Warren Bennis calls these “crucible” experiences.

Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of leadership to tackle the issues of the Digital Age in libraries!

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The public library: historic artifact or adaptive success? - Infographic

The public library: historic artifact or adaptive success? - Infographic | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

With the rise of online resources, public libraries are facing the challenge of having to adapt in order to remain engaging in their communities. Take a look at this infographic to see how they are making their mark in the digital age.

 

'This infographic examines the current use of public libraries and challenges to their preeminence as providers (and symbols) of knowledge."


Via Michelle Bourque, Robin Illsley
Karen du Toit's insight:

Public libraries making it in the digital age! - Infographic based on a 2012 Pew Research study of American public libraries.

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Dawne Tortorella's curator insight, May 2, 2013 10:47 PM

An infographic based on well researched data and cited appropriately - nice to see as a best practice.

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Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries edited by Peter Hernon and Joseph R Matthews

Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries edited by Peter Hernon and Joseph R Matthews | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Academic and public libraries are much different today than they were even 15 years ago. And with even bigger changes on the horizon, what lies in store? In this systematic attempt to speak to academic and public librarians about the future of library services, Hernon and Matthews invite a raft of contributors to step back and envision the type of future library that will generate excitement and enthusiasm among users and stakeholders. Anyone interested in the future of libraries, especially library managers, will be engaged and stimulated as the contributors:

Examine the current state of the library, summarizing existing literature on the topic to sketch in historical backgroundProject into the future, using SWOT analysis, environmental scans, and other techniques to posit how library infrastructure (such as staff, collections, technology, and facilities) can adapt in the decades aheadConstruct potential scenarios that library leaders can use to forge paths for their own institutions.

The collection of knowledge and practical wisdom in this book will help academic and public libraries find ways to honour their missions while planning for the broader institutional changes already underway.

http://bit.ly/15Wbo4U

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future libraries! Link to book!

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Hudson, Litchfield, Lyndeborough libraries embrace open-source software

By David Brooks:

Why would your local library, a symbol of print-on-paper respectability, embrace open-source software, a symbol of the digital world’s most anti-establishment streak?

Money, mostly. Open-source software, which can be used and tweaked by anybody and which carries no corporate charges, is reasonably close to being free.

But that’s the only reason, say some area librarians who are about to switch circulation, acquisitions, Web development, and other functions to one of two major open-source systems for libraries, called Evergreen and Koha.

“With proprietary (software), if you want an enhancement, a new feature, you’ll have to wait until demand builds for it. With Evergreen and Koha, you have access to a developer network worldwide that can work on it,” said Charlie Matthews, director of the Rodgers Library in Hudson. It is about to switch to Evergreen, originally developed for the Georgia state library system.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Open-source  > it makes sense!

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10 Stellar Presentations from Computers in Libraries 2013 - iLibrarian

10 Stellar Presentations from Computers in Libraries 2013 - iLibrarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Ellyssa Kroski

Info Today’s informative Computers in Libraries conference just wrapped up yesterday in Washington, DC. If you didn’t get a chance to attend you may want to check out these terrific presentations by talented info pros!

 
Karen du Toit's insight:

10 presentations from the most recent Computers in Libraries 2013 conference > Great content!!

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Are social enterprises the future for libraries? - Tim Smedley on The Guardian Professional

Are social enterprises the future for libraries? - Tim Smedley on The Guardian Professional | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Public sector cuts have led to a rise in the number of social enterprises running library services, but sustainability is a problem

 

[...]

Social enterprises are, however, offering much more than books and computer access – the mixed-use community hub, argues Dunn, is the library model for the next 30 years: "We're open longer now than when the local council ran the libraries. I really believe that there's a wider range of services that we offer from our libraries now... There are things that the local council do well, no question. But they are unable to move quickly and introduce new services quickly when the community asks for it." The reason why social enterprises can, he says, "is that we are the local community – there is no them and us."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Social enterprises are the future of libraries! Definitely!!

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Technolust - the fifth column of the information counter-revolution

Hugh Rundle:

We are in an era of unprecedented change for libraries and the life of information. Bookstores throughout the western world are closing down. Libraries in the USA, UK and some in Australia are being defunded or closed. Many question the relevance of libraries, including some librarians. I am again surrounded by defeatists and the hopelessly optimistic. Many librarians appear to be searching for One Big Technology to save us. I believe that just like in Tasmania in the 1990s, this is a flawed search.

[...]

There are many other systems for sharing ideas. Why do we need libraries? What is our ‘unique value proposition’?

Libraries are a system for sharing ideas

in a way underpinned by the values of

PRESERVATION, OPENNESS, FREEDOM and PRIVACY.

This is our ‘Unique Value Proposition’.


Karen du Toit's insight:

The future of libraries lies in their unique value propositon! Good argument!

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Examining The Future Role Of Libraries at #LIBER2013 | LIBER

by Friedel Grant “A university is just a group of buildings gathered around a library.”

– Shelby Foote

 

With this quotation, Dr. Professor Peter Strohschneider, Chairman of the German Council of Science and Humanities, began his keynote speech at LIBER’s 42nd annual conference in Munich, Germany.

 

“The library is a place in which learning and research happens, and in which knowledge orders are created,” continued Strohschneider. “As Foote suggests, the library lies at the very heart of the academic experience. A university without a library is more or less unthinkable. This being the case, Foote’s perspective raises some important questions when we consider the future of academic libraries.”

 

Strohschneider went on to explain how some of the most notable research discoveries can be attributed to serendipity. These accidental revelations can, however, be thwarted by the current enthusiasm for modern search engines which only lead researchers to targeted results.

 

From this opening talk, the future of libraries was repeatedly explored over the three days of the conference – particularly in relation to the vast quantities of data currently being created and the library’s role in helping researchers to manage and sift through that data.

 

With two new scholarly articles being published every minute, Dr. Jan Velterop asserted that structures such as nano-publications would become an essential tool for researchers to identify relevant material. This would, in turn, require libraries and publishers to adjust to a new world where the scientific journal was valued more as a source of raw material, in which researchers could look for knowledge patterns, than something to read.

 

4 Slideshares from the Conf:

1. 

The future of the science publishing ego-system http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/liber-munich-26june2013-2

2. 

Roadmaps, Roles and Re-engineering: Developing Data Informatics Capability in Libraries

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/roadmaps-roles-and-reengineering-developing-data-informatics-capability-in-libraries

 

3. 

A Revolution in Open Science: Open Data and the Role of Libraries (Professor Geoffrey Boulton at LIBER 2013

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/boulton-gsb-presentationlibermunich

 

4. 

Enabling Data-Intensive Science Through Data Infrastructures

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/morais-liber42-datainfrastructures-1

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future role of libraries! 

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10 Unusual Micro Libraries | World Literature Today

10 Unusual Micro Libraries | World Literature Today | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @asymptotejrnl: what's not to love about these 10 unusual micro-libraries? http://t.co/R3Js7j9v1e @worldlittoday

 

Check out these ten unique micro libraries and community book shares that have brought books to cities, neighborhoods, parks, and even beaches.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Very creative in creating micro libraries!

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Jane Ramsey's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:01 AM

Interesting....

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So do we really need superheros to sort out Public Libraries? | CLOA Blog

Yinnon Ezra - Gov Advisor, Lib Policy | So do we really need superheros to sort out Public Libraries? http://t.co/V6YDyNnKnl @VftL_UK et al So, it’s not about bright costumed, “superheroes” or flash gestures, but making sure that inspirational practice is shared and then turned into action – more next time. Yinnon Ezra MBE MA FRSA, DCMS Advisor for Libraries & cCLOA Member
Karen du Toit's insight:
For future libraries to survive...
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