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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Making Ebooks Accessible | American Libraries Magazine

Making Ebooks Accessible | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Submitted by Christopher Harris:

"As we go hunting for the right ebook readers for our patrons, accessibility is one of the factors to consider. People with vision, dexterity, or cognitive disabilities need certain specific features, and ebook readers are all over the map in what they offer and how they offer it. But it’s not as complicated as it might seem, and there’s some help available."

 

"Here’s a basic breakdown of who needs what:

- For people who are blind, the text must be spoken aloud, and descriptions provided for images and graphs. Controls must be distinguishable by touch. (Some touchscreen devices now provide a way for controls to announce their function without activating them.)
- For people with low vision, the text must be high contrast and magnifiable ,or in a large, easy-to-read font.
- For people with cognitive disabilities, controls must be easy to use. Text must be able to be spoken aloud and highlighted as it is spoken.
- For people with dexterity impairments, controls must be easy to operate, and not require more than one action at a time, or complicated actions. Devices must be easy to lift, hold, and operate with one hand.
- For people with hearing loss, audible alerts and alarms should have a visible form as well. Any audio content should be available in text."


Via Stacey Py Flynn
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Librarians on the Fly: Myth #4 How much Time Librarians Actually Read and How They Decide What To Read

Librarians on the Fly: Myth #4 How much Time Librarians Actually Read and How They Decide What To Read | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

And....."52% Host Book Clubs in the Library
40% Don't Belong in a Book Club and Don't Host a Book Club
5% Host a Book Club and Belong to an Adult Book Club
2% Teachers Host a Book Club
1% Belong to an Adult Book Club"


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Nearly 40% of libraries will let you check out an e-reader, as ebook penetration soars

Nearly 40% of libraries will let you check out an e-reader, as ebook penetration soars | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by ALEX WILHELM:

"New data out from the American Library Association (ALA) paints a firm picture of ebooks and their companion devices: that they are utterly now completely mainstream. Libraries, generally considered to be somewhat staid institutions, are offering ebooks for check out in growing numbers, and increasingly, offering up e-readers themselves for loan.

According to a study conducted by the ALA, some 76% of libraries offer ebooks to their patrons, up 9% from the year before. The same study indicates that 39% of libraries lend e-readers as well. Libraries are not the only folk having success with the lending of digital books, Amazon itself reported in April that its Kindle Owners’ Lending Library has greatly driven the sale of backlist titles."

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Tablet adoption lowers reading of physical books, newspapers, survey shows - Digital Lifestyle - Macworld UK

Tablet adoption lowers reading of physical books, newspapers, survey shows - Digital Lifestyle - Macworld UK | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Matt Hamblen:

"More than half of tablet adopters are reading books and other media on their tablet screens instead of relying on paper, a survey finding that should serve as a warning to publishers to adapt quickly to electronic media, Gartner analysts said."


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Beating Siri at Her Own Game: What's Next for Virtual Reference ... - Library Journal

Beating Siri at Her Own Game: What's Next for Virtual Reference ... - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

BY HENRIETTA THORNTON-VERMA:

'Library Journal "Beating Siri at Her Own Game: What's Next for Virtual Reference"

The librarians who attended Saturday's “What's Next for Virtual Reference” discussion group at ALA left with a lot to ponder."

 

Courtney Young's, a 2011 Library Journal Mover and Shaker [...],
first prediction: Cloud computing will become more ubiquitous in virtual reference. Using the cloud, she explained, means taking advantage of storage and other functions that are offered by Internet companies instead of being limited to the functions that are available on your own computer. Young used a show of hands to demonstrate that while many librarians are using services such as DropBox to store their work or personal documents, they aren’t using them with patrons, a change she urged the librarians in the room to make. They could, she suggested, create a “My Library Cloud” area into which materials could be deposited for patron use. Young recognized that the exact mechanisms of how this should work aren’t certain, acknowledging, for example that “ebooks are still shaking out,” but maintained that patrons “are used to using these services personally, and why wouldn’t they use them at the library?”
Next was a call to arms: “Siri is what we do,” she said, noting that what Apple calls iPhone’s “intelligent personal assistant” is “virtual reference embedded into a device that people are very attached to.” While it isn’t very effective right now, Young asserted, it can only improve, and librarians need to position themselves as the alternatives to the service before they find themselves replaced."

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Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows

Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Chris Meadows

"On MIT’s Technology Review, Nicholas Carr takes an in-depth look at the creation of the Digital Public Library of America, an attempt at a non-commercial universal electronic library (which I also mentioned last month) that hopes to provide universal access to as much of human knowledge as it can. Carr first looks at Google’s attempt to create Google Book Search, and the negotiated settlement that was thrown out as too overreaching. Though Google is moving ahead with its legal defense, the search market has shifted toward social networking meaning that a book search might not be as attractive to Google as it once was."

 

"But the biggest problem facing the DPLA may be the same one facing Google Books: the question of copyright. While the DPLA’s nonprofit status does open some doors to it that remain shut to Google Books (such as possibly working out the kind of licensing agreements with publishers that have given the commercial Google such trouble), it doesn’t give it carte blanche to offer works that are still under copyright. Having a truly comprehensive digital library could require Congress to pass new laws."

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2012 top ten trends in academic libraries

A review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee

"Three leaders in academic librarianship were the catalysts for this discussion: Martin Halbert, dean of libraries at University of North Texas; Joan Lippincott, associate director of Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), and Mark Puente, director of diversity and leadership programs, Association of Research Libraries (ARL). This discussion forum augmented the trends identified by the committee.

These top trends are listed alphabetically. Each trend includes a brief discussion and references to the literature. The committee also compiled additional resources that may be of interest."

 

- "Communication value

- Data curation

- Digital preservation

- Higher education

- Information technology

- Mobile environments

- Patron driven e-book acquisition

- Scholarly communication

- Staffing

- User behaviours and expectations"

 

The committee would like to thank Erin Hood, research assistant at OCLC Research, for her assistance in producing this document."

 

   
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South Brunswick Public Library Blog: When it comes to eBooks ...

South Brunswick Public Library Blog: When it comes to eBooks ... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Ever wonder why many of your favorite authors aren't available in an eBook or eAudiobook format from New Jersey libraries? The answer might surprise you..."

 

• Publishers who refuse to sell eBooks and/or eAudiobooks to libraries;
• Publishers who charge libraries as much as 5 times more than consumers for the same digital content;
• Publishers who embargo their content and will not sell to libraries any newly published digital content;
• Publishers who make digital content available in only some formats (ePub but not Kindle for example).

For years libraries have worked hand in hand with publishers. That relationship has now changed drastically and we find ourselves unable to deliver the digital content library patrons want."

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Consumers Choosing Tablets Over E-Readers, E-Book Sales to Suffer | Digital Book World

Consumers Choosing Tablets Over E-Readers, E-Book Sales to Suffer | Digital Book World | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Jeremy Greenfield:

"As consumers increasingly choose tablet computers over e-readers for e-book reading, the e-book business will be adversely affected, according to a new survey."

 

[...]"Kelly Gallagher, vice president of publishing services at Bowker Market Research, which partnered with BISG on the survey.

“Tablets will adversely affect the e-book business in that the tablet is a multifunction device and will therefore draw the reader into non-book activities and therefore cause them to consume books slower and therefore buy fewer books versus a single function e-reading device,” said Gallagher.

The survey, conducted among 1,000 e-book buyers in February 2012, has good news for publishers, too. Nearly two thirds of respondents said they spent more money on e-books once they bought an e-reading device of any kind and nearly three quarters said they bought more e-book titles.

In the short term, at least, e-book buying continues to rise despite the growing popularity of tablets."


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Libraries, publishers struggle over e-books boom, by Adam Foxman - Ventura County Star

Libraries, publishers struggle over e-books boom, by Adam Foxman - Ventura County Star | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Adam Foxman:

ROB VARELA/THE STAR

Adult services librarian Gladstone Bucknor holds a Sony Reader with the cover of a children's book (photo)

 

"E-book collections are booming at public libraries across Ventura County and the nation, but they’re also the subject of a struggle between libraries and the publishing industry.

Concerned about their bottom lines, four of the nation’s largest publishers refuse to sell their e-book catalogs to libraries, and the two others charge extra or limit lending for digital volumes, library officials say. Known as the "Big Six," these publishers are responsible for many of the popular books published nationwide.

Many public libraries lease their e-books through a single distributor, Ohio-based Overdrive, and some librarians worry about paying for electronic volumes they don’t own and can’t share among facilities like they can with print books.

These challenges are among the hottest topics in the library world, but Camarillo librarian Barbara Wolfe said she isn’t sure how much patrons know about the issue.

"I think people will be concerned once they learn about it — those people who cherish libraries and what libraries stand for," Wolfe said.

Read more: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/apr/16/libraries-publishers-struggle-over-e-books-boom/#ixzz1sHraZazG
- vcstar.com"

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The Running Librarian: Evaluating e-books in Law Libraries - Slideshare

The Running Librarian: Evaluating e-books in Law Libraries - Slideshare | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @aallnet: RT @WestlawSmallLaw: RT @erroladamsjdmls: The Running Librarian: Evaluating e-books in Law Libraries http://t.co/OsqVg6ox...

 

by JAMES MULLAN:

"The iLibrarian [Ellyssa Kroski] has published the slides from a recent presentation on e-books, which I've embedded below. In her talk she outlines some of the benefits and downsides to purchasing and maintaining e-book collections. If you've not thought about e-books before, this is a good introduction to the topic."

 

Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/ellyssa/evaluating-ebook-offerings?from=ss_embed&nbsp

 

 

Valid information for librarians from any library to consider, with statistics of tablet and ebook use 

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The Role of Social Media for Libraries, Part II » Heather Backman - New York #ebooks

The Role of Social Media for Libraries, Part II » Heather Backman - New York #ebooks | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Lisa Chau:

Heather Backman 

"She discusses here how technology such as e-books affected the library:

In one sense, e-books have changed very little about what libraries do or how we do it; they just allow us to deliver a basic library service in a different medium. Some people have said that e-books are “killing” the printed book or that they spell the end of libraries, but that hasn’t been my experience. To my mind, the e-book is not “killing” the printed book, just supplementing it. We are still buying physical books in large quantities and I expect that we will continue to do so for a long time. I would go so far as to say that I doubt the physical book will ever completely go away. Even if it does, libraries are more about information-sharing than about lending physical items; handling e-books may mean changes in some of our procedures but I don’t think that libraries will cease to exist when the e-book predominates."

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Thinking more about ebooks and libraries and what big publishers should do – The Shatzkin Files

Thinking more about ebooks and libraries and what big publishers should do – The Shatzkin Files | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Mike Shatzkin:

"The reluctance of most big publishers to make ebooks available through library lending is a topic of widespread attention and concern."

 

"If any big publisher asked me for an opinion about a library policy (and none has), this is what I’d say today.

1. Start immediately experimenting with “baskets” of titles. [...]

2. One set of experiments that should be productive would be on titles that have already had their high-volume run. [...]

3. Look at the “make” books on an upcoming list: those that aren’t by big name authors that are already guaranteed to sell well. [...]

4. License titles for two or three years rather than limiting the number of loans. [...]

5. Explore ways for libraries to sell ebooks to patrons who discover titles through them but, for whatever reason, want to purchase them. [...]"

 

"Publishers’ concerns about the impact of library lending are reasonable. But responding to that concern by simply “freezing” is not helpful to anybody and it may actually be damaging the sales of the books the publishers are trying to protect. I don’t know and the librarians don’t know what the marketplace impact will be of branded ebooks being made available through libraries, but the publishers don’t know either. It is time for all of us to start finding out."

 

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E-books in Libraries: A Briefing Document developed in preparation for a Workshop on E-Lending in Libraries | Berkman Center

By David O'Brien:

"Beginning with a brief overview of the history and the current state of the e-book publishing market, the document traces the structure of the licensing practices and business models used by distributors to make e-books available in libraries, and identifies select challenges facing libraries and publishers. Where possible, we have made an effort to incorporate stakeholder perspectives and real-world examples to connect analysis to the actual questions, issues, and challenges that arise in practice. The document concludes with a number of informative resources – including news articles, whitepapers, stakeholder and trade association reports, and other online sources – that might inform future conversations, investigations, pilot projects, and best practices in this space."

 

Paper here: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2111396

 

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E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education

E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Howard:

 

James R. Mouw  (University of Chicago Library):

First, if there are going to be print and digital versions, they should be available at the same time, so the library can decide which best suits its needs.

Second, digital monographs need to be made available in a way that allows the library to pick and choose and not make duplicate purchases.

Third, the Chicago library strongly prefers to buy digital content that’s guaranteed be permanently accessible, “so we essentially own it,” Mouw said.

 

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Ebook Strategy and Public Libraries: Slow Just Won’t Work Anymore — The Digital Shift

Ebook Strategy and Public Libraries: Slow Just Won’t Work Anymore — The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Pat Losinski

 

 

"OK, it’s time for a little tough love for public library leaders. We haven’t been as visionary, vigilant and assertive as we need to be when it comes to mapping our future in the ebook world. And unfortunately, too much of our time has been spent reacting to business models that seemingly reflect only commercial interests, rather than boldly advocating for business models that also serve the public’s interests.

Our primary role is to champion the rights of access for our users. Our ebook strategy needs a serious overhaul, and it needs to happen right now. Unless we move quickly, the technology divide that we’ve all been battling the last 20 years will look like a minor skirmish compared to the content divide that is mounting."

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EXTRA ETHER: eBooks Gone in 5 Years? | Hugh McGuire

EXTRA ETHER: eBooks Gone in 5 Years? | Hugh McGuire | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Porter Anderson:

The distinction between “the Internet” and “books” is arbitrary, and will disappear in 5 years. Start adjusting now"


Via Trudy Raymakers
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